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Full text of "History of congregations of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland and biographical notices of eminent Presbyterian ministers and laymen, with the signification of names of places"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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GENEALOGY 
H6S9E 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS 

OP THE 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN IRELAND 

AND 

BIOGEAPHICAL NOTICES 

OF EMINENT 

PRESBYTEEIAN MINISTEES AND LAYMEN. 



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HISTORY 



OP 



CONGREGATIONS 

OF THE 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN IRELAND 

AND 

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES 

OF EMINENT 

PRESBYTERIAN MINISTERS AND LAYMEN. 

WITH INTRODUCTION AND NOTES 

BY THE 

EEV. W. D. KILLBN, D.D., 

PBOFESSOB OP ECCLESIASTICAL HISIOBr, 
QEKKBAL ASSBMBLX'S COLLEQB, BBLFAST. 

ILLUSTSATED WITH PORTRAITS OF 

THE REV. HENRY COOKE, D.D., LL.D. J REV. J. S. REID, D.D. ; 
AND REV. W. D. KILLEN, D.D. 

WITH THE SIGNIFICATION OF NAMES OP PLACES. 



BELFAST: JAMES CLEELAND. 
EDINBURGH: JAMES GEMMELL. 

1886. 



BELFAST: 
PRINTED BY HUGH ADAIR, ARTHUR STREET. 



CONTENTS. 



Introduction, 



1-9 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 



Aghadowev ... 
Ahoghill ist 
Anaghlone 1st 
Anaglilone 2nd 
Anahilt 
Antrim 1st . 
Ardglass 
Ardstraw 1st 
Armagh 1st . 
Armagh 3rd . 
Armoy 
Athlone 
Aughnacloy . 



Badoney 
Bailieborough 
Ballacolla 
Ballina 
Ballinderry .. 
Ballindreat . . 
Ballinglen 
Baliybay 1st .. 
Ballybay 2ud 
Bally carry . . 
Bally castle .. 
Ballyclare 
Bally easton Is 
Ballygawley,.. 
Ballygowan, .. 
Ballygrainey, 
Ballyjamesduff 
Ballykelly, , 
Ballylennon, 
Ballymena 1st, 



1st 



Page 
11 
12 
13 
13 
14 
15 
18 
19 
20 
22 
22 
23 
23 

24 
25 
26 

245 
27 
28 

246 
29 
30 
30 
32 
32 
33 
34 
35 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 



Pago 
Ballymena 2nd or High Kirk, 40 

Ballymena, West Church, 41 

Ballymena, Wellington St., 42 
Ballymoate, ... ... 43-247 

Ballymoney 1st, ... 43 

Ballynahinch 1st, ... 45 

Ballynahinch — Spa ... 229 

Bally nure, ... ... 46 

Ballyrashane 1st, ... 48 

Ballyroney, ... ... 49 

Ballyshannon, ... 50 

Bally waiter 1st, ... 50 

Bally waiter 2na, ... 51 

Bally willan, ... ... 52 

Balteagh, ... ... 53 

Banagher, ... ... 53 

Banbridge 1st, ... 54 

Bangor 1st, ... ... 55 

Bangor 2nd, ... ... 56 

Ballymacarrett Ist ... 57 

Belfast - Donegall Street 57 

Belfast— Fisherwick Place 58 

Belfast — Fitzroy Avenue 59 

Belfast -May Street ... 60 

Belfast — Rosemary Street 61 

Belfast— Townsend Street 6i 

Belfast— York Street ... 65 

Belturbet ... ... 66 

Benburb ... ... C6 

Billy or Bushmills ... 68 

Boardniills ... ... 69 

Boveva ... ••• 69 

Boyle 248 

Hrigh ... ... 70 



VI. 



Broughshane Ist 

Buckna 

Burt 

Bushmills or Billy 

Cairncastle ... 

Car Ian 

Carlingford ... 

Carlow 

Carndonagh ... 

Carnmoney ... 

Carntall or Clogher . 

Carrickfergus 1st 

Castlebar, 

Castleblayney 

Castled awson 

Castlederg 1st 

Castlereagh ... 

Cavan 

Cavaualeck ... 

Clare 

Cloglier 

Clogher or Carntall .. 

Clonmel 

Clontibret 1st 

Clough, Co. Antrim .. 

Clough, Co. Down 

Clougherney,.. 

Coagh 

Coleraine 1st... 

Coleraine 2nd 

Comber 1st ... 

Comber 2nd ... 

Conlig 

Connor 

Convoy 

Cookstown 1st 

Cootehill 

Corboy and Tully 

Cork — Trinity Churclx 

Corlea 

Creggan 

Creevelea 

Croaglunore ... 

Crumlin 

Cullybackey ... 

Cumber, Co. Derry 

Cushenduu ... 



Page 




Page 


70 


Dervock 


111 


72 


Donaghadee 1st 


111 


73 


Donaghadee 2nd 


113 


68 


Donagheady 1st 


113 




Donagheady 2nd 


114 


74 


Donegal 


114 


75 


Donegall Street 


57 


76 


Donegore 1st 


115 


77 


Donoughmore, Co. Down 


117 


78 


Donougbmore, Co. Donega' 


1!8 


78 


Douglass 


119 


89 


Downpatrick 


119 


80 


Drogheda 


120 


248 


Dromara 1st ... 


121 


84 


Dromore 1st ... 


122 


85 


Dromore West, 


250 


86 


Drum 1st 


123 


87 


Drumachose ... 


124 


87 


Drumbanaglier 1st 


125 


88 


Drumbo 


126 


89 


DrumloLigh ... 


127 


249 


Drumquin ... 


127 


89 


Dublin — Mary's Abbey 


128 


90 


Dublin — Usher's Quay 


130 


91 


Dunboe 


132 


92 


Dundalk 


132 


93 


Dundonald ... 


134 


94 


Dundrod 


135 


94 


Dunean 


135 


95 


Dunfanaghy ... 


136 


97 


Dungannon 1st 


137 


97 


Dunluce 


138 


99 


Dunmurry ... 


139 


99 






99 


Enniskillen ... 


140 


102 


Ervey 


142 


103 






104 


Fahan 


143 


11)4 


Faunet 


144 


106 


Faughanvale 


144 


106 


Fintona 


145 


107 


Finvoy 


146 


249 


Fisher wick Place, 


58 


108 


Fitzroy Avenue, 


69 


1C8 






109 


Galway 


146 


109 


Garvagh Ist ... 


147 


110 


Glastry 


148 



Vll. 



Glenarm 


Page 

149 


Maghera 


Page 
188 


Glendermot 1st 


15] 


Magherafelt 1st 


190 


Glendermot 2nd 


152 


Magherally ... 


191 


Glennan 


153 


Magilligan ... 


192 


Glenwherry ... 


154 


Maguiresbridge 


192 


Grange 


155 


Malin 


192 


Greyabbey ... 


166 


Marketbill 1st 


193 


Groomsport ... 


158 


May Street, ... 


60 






Milford 


194 


High Kirk or 2nd Ballymena 40 


Millisle 


194 


Hillsborough 


158 


Minterburn ... 


195 


Hilltown 


159 


Moira 


196 


Hollymount 


250 


Monaghan 1st 


198 


Holy wood 1st 


159 


Moneymore 1st 


198 






Monreagh, ... 


200 


Inch 


161 


Mountmellick 


201 


Islandmagee 1st 


161 


Mountjoy 


203 






Mourne 


203 


Keady 1st ... 


163 


Moville 


204 


Keady 2nd ... 


163 


Mullingar 


205 


Killala, 


251 


Mary's Abbey 


128 


KiUead 


164 






Killeshandra... 


165 


Newport 


252 


Killeter 


166 


Newry 1st ... 


206 


Killinchv 


167 


NewtoAVTiards 1st 


207 


Killyleagh 1st 


168 


Newtownards 2nd 


208 


Kilmore 


169 


Newtowncrommelin ... 


209 


Kiiraughts 1st 


170 


Newtownhamilton 


210 


Kilrea 1st 


171 


Newtownstewart 1st ... 


210 


Kingstown ... 


173 






Kirkcubbin ... 


173 


Omagh 1st ... 


211 


Knowhead ... 


174 


Omagh 2nd ... 


211 






Ormond Quay 


130 


Lame 1st 


174 


Orritor 


212 


Letterkenny 1st 


176 






Limavady 2nd 


176 


Pettigo 


212 


Limerick 


177 


Portadown 1st 


213 


Lisburn 1st ... 


178 


Portaferry ... 


214 


Lislooney 


180 


Portglenone 1st 


217 


Lissara 


181 


Portrush 


217 


Londonderry 1st 


181 






Londonderry 3rd 


184 


Eamelton 1st... 


220 


Longford 


184 


Ramoan 


221 


Loughbrickland 


184 


Randal stown 1st 


221 


Loughgall 


185 


Raphoe 1st ... 


224 


Lurgan 1st ... 


186 


Rathfriland 1st 


225 






Ray 1st 


225 


Macosquin ... 


187 


Richhill 


227 



VIU. 





Page 




Page 


Rosemary Street 


61 


Tobermore . . . 


236 


Rutland Square 


128 


Town send Street 


64 


Saintfield 1st 


227 


Trinity 


106 


Scriggan 


228 


Tullamore . . . 


237 


Sion and Urney 


240 


Tullv and Corboy 


104 


Sligo 


252 


Tullylish ... 


239 


Spa — Ballynaliinch 


229 


Turlougli 


253 


Stewartstown 1st 


230 


Urney and Sion 


240 


St. Johnstone 


230 


Usher's Quay 


130 


Stonebridge ... 


231 


"Wellington Street 


42 


Strabane 1st... 


232 


Westport 


254 


Stranorlar 1st 


233 


West Church 


41 


Tandragee ... 


234 


York Street ... 


65 


Templepatrick 


235 







BIOGEAPHICAL NOTICES. 





Page 


The Fathers of the Irish Presbyterian Church ... 


256 


Walter Travers 


257 


Rev. Samuel Hanna, D.D. 


258 


Rev. James Seaton Reid, D.D. 


260 


Rev. James Carlile, D.D. 


262 


Rev. John Edgar, D.D., L.L.D. 


263 


Rev. James Morgan, D.D. 


264 


Rev. Henry Cooke, D.D., LL.D. 


266 


William Kirk, Esq. ... 


271 


John Getty, Esq. 


272 


James Kennedy, Esq., J. P. 


273 


William M'Comb, Esq. 


274 


Rev. William M'Clure, 


276 


S. Hamilton Rowan, Esq. 


276 


William Todd, Esq. ... 


278 


Miss Hamilton 


279 


John Sinclair, Esq. ... 


279 


Rev. John Thomson ... 


280 


Rev. Henry Jackson Dobbin, D.D. 


283 


John Young, Esq. 


284 



Signification of Names of Places 



288 




INTEODUCTIOK 




HE greater part of the information contained in 
the work now presented to the public, was col- 
lected by the Eev. J. S. Eeid, D.D., before his 
appointment as Professor of Ecclesiastical and 
Civil History in the University of Glasgow. For the twentv 
years preceding, his attention had been specially directed 
to the rise and progress of the Presbyterian Church in 
Ireland ; and he had enjoyed special facilities for becomino- 
acquainted with its condition. He had travelled throuo-h 
most parts of our ISTorthern Province ; had gathered up the 
traditions of the Presbyterian inhabitants ; had carefully 
examined the manuscript records of the Synod of Ulster ; 
and had noted down, in a little volume which he usually 
carried about with him, every important fact or date which 
helped to guide him in his investigations. Shortly after his 
decease, I undertook, at the request of his executors, to 
complete his unfinished History ; and this manuscript book 
was put into my hands to assist me in the work. I found 
that it contained a brief account of the congregations of the 
Synod of Ulster, arranged in alj)habetical order ; and as, for 
many reasons, it appeared very undesirable that the rare 
knowledge it supplied should be lost to the public, I sug- 
gested to the proprietor of M'Comb's Pkesbyteeian Almanac 
that he should permit me to introduce some extracts from it, 
year after year, into his well-known annual. He adopted the 
advice ; and thus it has been that for upwards of thirty years 
past these notices have been continued in that publication. 
They are now collected together ; and, with not a few addi- 
tions, are to be found in the present volume. 

To many readers the following pages, — consisting, to a 
great extent, of dates and names, — may have a rather 



2 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

uninviting aspect; but, to thousands and tens of thousands 
in this and otlier lands, they cannot be altogether -without 
interest. The inscription on a tombstone generally furnishes 
very scanty information relating to the dead ; and yet, at the 
distance of a century or more, it is perused with avidity by 
heirs or descendants. The departed ministers of the Presby- 
terian Church in Ireland have miiltitudes of living represen- 
tatives scattered all over the world ; and, to these, this work 
will supply some statistical details relating to their ancestors 
which they must seek for in vain elsewhere. Nor to readers 
of another class can it be altogether devoid of value. It 
incidentally throws light on the state of society at different 
periods during the last two hundred and seventy years ; and 
illustrates in various ways the progress of the country. 

The Presbyterian Church in Ireland has had a somewhat 
strange and eventful history. It was planted in Ulster early 
in the seventeenth century by immigi*ants from Scotland, 
who hoped to have here a greater amount of religious freedom 
than they were permitted to enjoy at home. For a time 
their pastors were suffered to exercise their ministry without 
disturbance ; and a signal blessing rested on their labours : 
but the hand of High Church intolerance was soon put forth 
to interfere with their operations; they were ejected from the 
parish churches in which they had heretofore officiated ; and 
were otherwise exposed to grievous persecution. The Black 
Oath — pledging them to obey all the royal commands — no 
matter how wicked or unreasonable — was next required from 
all the Scotch settlers ; and when they refused to comply with 
this unrighteous demand, they were fined and imprisoned. 
But He who can bring light out of darkness overruled these 
oppressive meastires for their good. The Presbyterian 
ministers and people, thus driven out of the country, escaped 
to a large extent the Irish massacre of 1641, in which so 
many thousands of the Protestant inhabitants perished. A 
Scottish army soon afterwards arrived in the north to quell 
the insurrection of the Romanists ; and, under its auspices, 
on the 10th of June, 1642, the first Irish Presbytery was 
constituted at Carrickfergus. Congregations were established 
almost immediately afterwards in various parts of Down and 
Antrim ; and, ever since, the Presbyterian Church has main- 
tained a firm footing in the Province of Ulster. The Solemn 
League and Covenant — adopted in 1643 by the English 
Parliament and the Assembly of Divines at Westminster — 



INTKODUCTION. 3 

was entered into with enthusiasm by the Scottish settlers in 
Ireland ; and at the same time a considerable number of the 
Episcopal clergy in the north joined the Presbyterian 
standard. Presbyterianism was now rapidly developed in 
the country ; fresh immigrants arrived from Scotland and 
England ; and the Reformed faith spread its influence to the 
•utmost bounds of the Northern Province. 

On the accession of Oliver Cromwell to supreme power, the 
Presbyterian ministers in Ireland were involved in trouble ; 
for they gave deadly offence to the Eepublicans by protesting 
against the execution of Charles I., and by refusing to take 
the Engagement binding them to the support of the new 
government. When, however, the Protector saw that they 
were men not disposed to create political disturbance, and 
bent mainly on the spiritual enlightenment of the people, he 
changed his policy, and gave them considerable encourage- 
ment. Presbyterianism meanwhile made steady progress for 
several years, so that, at the period of the Restoration, its 
adherents in Ulster were computed to amount to one hundred 
thousand. But dark days now awaited it. The ministers 
were exposed to a fresh proscription when the Protestant 
bishops, who had meanwhile been in exile, were restored to 
power. 

During the twenty-eight years intervening between the 
Restoration and the Revolution, the Irish Presbyterian 
Church was almost uninterruptedly in the furnace. Its 
ministers were often obliged to preach to their people under 
cover of the darkness of the night ; they were again and 
again thrown into confinement ; they celebrated their ordina- 
tions in places of concealment ; and, if they ventured to 
dispense the Lord's Supper, they were liable, on conviction 
in each case, to a fine of one hundred pounds. Strange as it 
may appear, they obtained, during this dreary interval, their 
first grant of Recjium Donum. It was given in 1672, and 
amounted only to d£600 per annum. It seems to have been 
due, as much to the fears, as to the gratitude of Charles II. 
He knew, indeed, that the Presbyterians had contributed 
efiiciently to bring about the Restoration ; and he admitted 
the hardship of their being obliged to suffer, first for him, 
and then under him ; but, had he not dreaded the machina- 
tions of the disaffected Cromwellians who were still in 
Ireland, and had he not expected that the grant would help 
to keep the Presbyterians from joiniug with these exasperated 



4 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

enemies, it may be cToubted wliethei' he ever would have 
thought of bestowing on them the Royal Bounty. It was 
paid very irregularly; and, when his brother, James II., 
succeeded to the throne, it ceased altogether. 

The Revolution of 1688 was like life from the dead to the 
Irish Presbyterians. They hailed with delight the arrival 
of their Dutch Deliverer in England ; and, mainly through 
their instrumentality, the city of Derry brought its memor- 
able siege to a triumphant termination. The new monarch 
was well aware that they were almost the only reliable 
friends he had in this country ; and, a few days before the 
battle of the Boyne, he testified his appreciation of their 
support by bestowing on their ministers a grant of d£l,200 
per annum. But, notwithstanding this token of royal 
favour, they were still left to struggle under various legal 
disabilities. The members of the Irish Legislature were, 
with a very few exceptions, High Churchmen ; and even the 
influence of the King could not induce them to concede to 
their non-conforming fellow- subjects the indulgence of an 
Act of Toleration. The war of the Revolution had well-nigh 
depopulated not a few districts of the country ; many farms 
in Ulster had become vacant ; and Scotchmen, tempted by 
the prospect of cheap rents and a fertile soil, had, in a few 
years, vastly augmented the Presbyterian population. Prelacy 
had just at this time been overthrown in North Britain ; and 
its friends began to entertain fears that it was destined to 
share a similar fate in this country. Hence it was that 
Presbyterianism was viewed with so much jealousy in high 
places throughout the whole reign of William III. The 
Episcopal clergy felt very uncomfortable as they contemplated 
its progress. As a body they stood low in ministerial 
character ; many of them had continued to pray publicly for 
the success of James II. until they found that they could no 
longer with safety proclaim theii attachment to his dynasty ; 
they had little of the zeal, and they could not emulate the 
ability of the ministers of the Presbyterian Church ; and 
they resisted most vehemently every attempt to improve the 
political position of their dreaded rivals. 

When the grave closed on King William, the Irish Presby- 
terians were made to feel that they had lost a friend. He had 
been unable to induce the Irish Parliament to relieve them 
from the pressure of the jienal laws ; but, when they were 
harassed for non-conformity, he had kindly interposed, and 



INTRODUCTION. 5 

quashed the lirosecution. They experienced very different 
treatment in the reign of Queen Anne. Their disabilities 
were then increased ; and had it not been for the rather 
unexpected death of that weak-minded Princess, they would 
have been deprived of almost the last vestige of religious 
freedom. The Test Act, passed soon after she ascended the 
throne, excluded them from all offices of trust and emolu- 
ment under the Crown, whether civil or military; and by 
this most nefarious piece of legislation, some of the very 
men who had so nobly defended Derry Avere driven out of 
the corporation of the Maiden City, and marked with a 
brand of social degradation. Before the close of her reign 
the doors of some of their meeting-houses were nailed up, 
and the Recjium Donum withdrawn. On the accession of 
George I. the grant was restored; and soon afterwards a 
considerable addition was made to it. In 1719 they at 
length obtained an Act of Toleration ; but at this time their 
numbers began to be much thinned by emigration. Many 
of the leases given, on very moderate terms, about the close 
of the wars of the Revolution, then expired ; and the farmers, 
discouraged by the demand of doubled or tripled rents, 
crossed the Atlantic in large numbers, and settled in the 
Western world. It is said that in 1729 six thousand Irish 
— almost all of whom were Presbyterians — removed there. 
Before the middle of the century twelve thousand persons of 
the same class arrived annually on the Western shores. 
When we consider that this emigration has been going on 
constantly, and sometimes to a far greater extent, for 
upwards of one hundred and fifty years, we may well wonder 
that Irish Presbyterianism holds its present position in the 
national census. It has been computed that its children now 
in the great Western Republic amount to about two millions. 
Had it not been for this prodigious drain of emigration, 
Presbyterians would at this day constitute an overwhelming 
majority of our Irish Protestant population. 

In the reign of George I. a calamity of a far more serious 
character sadly weakened the Irish Presbyterian Church. 
At that time some of its leading ministers began to plead 
for relief from subscription to its recognised creed — the 
Westminster Confession of Faith. They did not openly 
attack its doctrines — though they were suspected of a leaning 
to a more lax theology — but they maintained that all such 
formularies were unauthorised as tests of orthodoxy; and 



6 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

they argued with so much plausibility that they secured the 
adherence of a number of the more influential laity. The 
controversy, which was carried on for several years with 
much bitterness, terminated in 1726 in a separation. The 
majority, forming by far the greater portion of the Synod 
of Ulster, persisted in requiring subscription to the West- 
minster Confession from candidates for the ministry ; and 
the minority, who were known as Non-Suhscrihers, formed 
themselves into what was called the Presbytery of Antrim. 
This schism greatly impaired the strength and reputation of 
the whole Presbyterian body. Several members of the Synod 
of Ulster, who did not join with the Separatists, were under- 
stood to sympathise with them ; and from this period till the 
end of the century a section of its ministers, designated the 
New Light party, and preaching a diluted Arminianism, if 
not something worse, occupied not a few of its pulpits, and 
conti-olled its deliberations. The Synod thus lost much of 
its prestige as an evangelical denomination. 

When the controversy between the Subscribers and Non- 
Subscribers was agitating the North of Ireland, the Church 
of Scotland was disturbed by disputes relative to ecclesias- 
tical patronage. In the end the Erskines and a few other 
ministers withdrew from its pale ; and in 1739 formed a new 
organization, which assumed the name of the Associate 
Presbytery. The Seceding preachers soon found their way 
into Ireland ; and as the more pious portion of the Presby- 
terian laity in this country had little confidence in the New 
Light ministers, these new evangelists were cordially received 
here, and quickly succeeded in collecting congregations. 
The first Irish Seceding minister was ordained at Lyle Hill, 
near Temj^lepatrick, in the County of Antrim, on the 9th of 
July, 1746. Within fifteen years afterwards no less than 
three Seceding Presbyteries were constituted in the Noi'th of 
Ireland ; and in 1784 their ministers received from Grovern- 
ment an endowment of =£500 per annum. In the forty-six 
years, between 1746 and 1792, they erected in the north 
forty-six congregations and ordained forty-six ministers. In 
the next seventeen years they increased still more rapidly, 
for in 1809 their pastors amounted to ninety-one, having been 
nearly doubled during this short interval. 

The last twenty-five years of the eighteenth century 
witnessed the rapid advance of the Irish Presbyterians in 
political importance. When the settlers in North America 



INTRODUCTION. 7 

set up tlie standard of independence, so many troops were 
sent there that most parts of Ireland were left almost 
destitute of military protection ; and when Fi-ance declared 
on the side of the revolted colonies, her ships of war appeai-ed 
in the British Seas and threatened a descent on the coasts of 
Ulster. The people in Down, Antrim, and other counties, 
obliged, in consequence, to take measures for their own 
defence, formed military organizations in their respective 
districts, and accustomed themselves to martial exercises. 
These Volunteers soon combined ; appeared together in 
thousands at reviews ; and presented the appearance of a large 
and well-equipped army. At their great meetings they dis- 
cussed the politics of the day, passed resolutions, adopted 
petitions to the legislature, and proclaimed their determina- 
tion to exert their united strength in struggling for the 
removal of existing grievances. As the Presbyterians in the 
north constituted the bulk of the Volunteers, they wielded 
for the time being a preponderating influence ; and Grovern- 
ment soon saw the expediency of lending a favourable ear to 
their representations. Thus it was that several disabilities 
under which they had long laboured were quickly removed. 
In 1780 the Test Act was repealed. In 1782 an Act was 
passed declaring the validity of all marriages celebrated 
among Presbyterians by ministers of their own denomination ; 
and in the same year another Act permitted Seceders to 
swear by lifting up the right hand, instead of kissing the 
book. Other favours soon followed. In 1784 one thousand 
pounds per annum were added to the Regiiim Domim of the 
Synod of Ulster ; and in 1792 an additional augmentation 
of d£5,000 per '>nnum was granted. 

Whilst the ministers and people of the Synod of Ulster 
were obtaining relief from their political disabilities, they 
were otherwise exhibiting few indications of improvement. 
Por the twenty years preceding 1789 not one new congrega- 
tion was erected ; and much the same state of things 
continued for the twenty years following. Little regard was 
paid to the sanctification of the Lord's Day; intemperance 
abounded ; family worship was neglected ; error in various 
forms raised its head ; and infidelity made not a few 
proselytes. But the awful scenes connected with the 
rebellion of 1798 helped to awaken a sleeping Church. 
From that date we may trace the development of a more 
religious spirit among both ministers and people. Evangelical 



O HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

preachers appeared in greater numbers ; decayed meeting- 
houses began to be repaired or rebuilt ; increased attention 
was given to the education of candidates for the sacred 
office ; and arrangements were made for the more faithful 
administration of ecclesiastical discipline. At length the 
New Light party in the Synod found themselves so encircled 
by a network of regulations for the conservation of orthodoxy, 
that they saw they must be prepared either to leave the 
body or to submit to certain extinction. In 1829 they 
accordingly withdrew from it, constituted themselves into a 
new society, and adopted the title of Remonstrants. Their 
separation prepared the way for a junction between the 
Ulster Synod and the Seceders. The union was consummated 
in 1840, when the ministers and people thus incorporated 
assumed the designation of " The General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church in Ireland." The Synod of Ulster 
contributed 292 congregations to the United Church, and 
the Seceding Synod gave 141 — thus making up a total of 
433. Since that period the congregations have continued to 
increase ; and at present (1886) they amount to 553. 

In the early part of this century a new arrangement was 
made in reference to the Begmm Bommi. It had before been 
generally distributed, share and share alike, among the 
ministers, so that, as their numbers multiplied, the portion 
of each diminished. With all the augmentations made since 
the days of William III., the share of each recipient of the 
Synod of Ulster in 1800 little exceeded =£30 per annum. 
But shortly after the Union between Great Britain and 
Ireland the grant was increased to considerably above 
.£14,000 per annum, and the ministers were divided into 
three classes — the first class receiving ^6100 per annum, the 
second ^£75, and the third ,£50. In 1809 the Seceders also 
obtained an enlarged grant of Royal Bounty, and the 
recipients were arranged in three divisions: but they were 
dealt with according to a lower rate of j)ayment — the first 
class receiving .£70 per annum, the second =£50, and the 
third c£40. In 1838 this system of classification was aban- 
doned ; and Government agreed, on certain conditions, to 
grant <£75 per annum, late Irish currency, to every minister 
connected with the Synod of Ulster and the Secession Synod. 
This endowment added very considerably to the amount paid 
out of the Imperial Treasury ; but it was exceedingly satis- 
factory to the two Synods, as the unequal payments under 



INTRODtrCTION, 9 

the nale of classification had ever since the time of its 
introduction been the sul)ject of complaint and remonstrance. 
The money was annually voted by Parliament, and the 
erection of every new congregation involved an enlargement 
of the allowance. In 1868, when the grant was about to be 
discontinued, the portion of it paid to the ministers of the 
General Assembly had grown to about d83 7,000 per annum. 

In March, 1868, Mr. Gladstone moved, in his place in 
Parliament, a series of resolutions to the effect that the Irish 
Protestant Ej^iscopal Establishment should cease — that the 
endowment of the Roman Catholic College of Maynooth 
should be discontinued — and that the Begium Bonum should 
be withdrawn — full compensation being made for the life 
interests of the existing beneficiaries. These resolutions 
were adopted by a large majority of the Commons, and a 
Bill — known as the Suspensory Bill — was introduced to 
legalise them ; but though the proposal was readily adopted 
by the Lower House of Legislation, it was negatived by the 
Lords. A dissolution of Parliament followed. Mr. Gladstone 
was sustained in the new house by an increased majority of 
supporters — and in the end the Disestablishment Bill became 
the law of the land. 

The period of Disestablishment was an anxious time with 
all interested in the prosperity of the Presbyterian Church 
of Ireland. Some feared that it could not well survive the 
crisis of the withdrawal of the Regium Domim. But its 
doctrines and polity are very dear to thousands and tens of 
thousands of those connected with its communion ; and it 
soon appeared that its friends were prepared to meet the 
emergency. With very few exceptions its ministers com- 
muted their life incomes in the interest of the Church ; and 
in this way a capital fund of upwards of d£580,000 was at once 
created. A Sustentation Fund — now amounting to about 
d£25,000 per annum — was also commenced ; and thus, not- 
withstanding the depression of the mercantile and agricul- 
tural interests for some years past, the ministerial income 
has not suffered. At a great public meeting, held in Linen 
Hall Street Church, Belfast, on the 29th of September, 1869, 
John Lytle, Esq., J.P., in the chair, the representatives of 
the laity pledged themselves to do their utmost to raise a 
Sustentation Fund of not less than ^£30,000 per annum, with 
a view to make up the income of all participators in the 
Sustentation Fund and their successors to at least d8100 per 



10 ■ HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

annum independent of congregational payments. The 
Sustentation Fund has not yet received the support of a 
considerable section of the Presbyterian laity : and the 
"unfavourable circumstances of farmers and traders have 
hitherto interfered with the accomplishment of these good 
intentions ; but it is to be hoped that in a short time the 
sum aimed at by the Belfast meeting will be fully idealised. 

The manuscript volume — most parts of which have been 
transferred to the following pages — was left behind him by 
the writer in a state evidently not designed for publication ; 
and it is quite possible that the critical reader may be able to 
detect some slight errors in dates or the spelling of names ; 
but Dr. Reid was remarkable for the accuracy with which he 
noted down all things of historical value ; and I believe that 
if any mistakes have been committed, they will be found to 
be but few and unimportant. It may be that some of them 
are to be attributed, rather to the editor, than the author. 
The ministerial succession in the several congregations are 
brought down to the present time ; and as upwards of thirty 
years have now passed away since the last entry was made in 
Dr. Reid's book, I must be held accountable for these recent 
additions. In all such cases I have taken the dates and 
names from the Minutes of the General Assembly. 

Appended to the history of congi'egations, it has been 
thought desirable to supply the readers of this volume with 
a few brief notices of distinguished ministers and laymen 
who have adorned the Ii'ish Presbyterian Church during the 
present century. Some other articles of an historical 
character have also been subjoined. 

W. D. KiLLEN. 





■^-■fe:' 




j&ofessor of Ecclesiastical History] 
I Assemtlys College, Belfast. l 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 



AGHADOWEY. 

The fii-st minister was tlie Eev. Thomas Boyd. He was 
deposed in 1661 for non-conformity, and in 1662 was ordered 
to be tried by tlie House of Lords ; but, notwithstanding, 
he still continued to minister to the jieople. We find him in 
this charge in 1671-2. He retired to Derry at the period of 
the troubles, and remained in the city during all the time of 
the siege. He died in this charge in 1699. He was suc- 
ceeded by the Eev. James M'Gregor, who was ordained here 
June 25th, 1701. About 1720, Mr. M'Gregor resigned the 
charge of the congregation, and went to America. He was 
succeeded by the Eev. John Elder, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Coleraine, May 7th, 1723. In 1726, Mr. 
Elder joined the ISTon-Subscribing Presbytery of Antrim, and 
a new erection was in consequence attempted, but without 
success. Mr. Elder died on the 24th of September, 1779, in 
the 87th year of his age. He had previously become infirm ; 
and, on his resignation of the congregation, it revei'ted to the 
Synod, and the Eev. Samuel Hamilton was ordained here 
June 8th, 1773. Mr. Hamilton died July 18th, 1788. The 
next minister was the Eev. Archibald Fullerton, who was 
ordained on the second Tuesday of December, 1790. He 
died January 1st, 1813, and left a large family. One of his 
sons, the late George Fullerton, M.D., rose to distinction in 
the Australian colonies, and when a Eepresentative Govern- 
ment was granted to Queensland, he was appointed a member 
of the Legislative Council or Upper Chamber. Shortly before 
his death — which happened only a few years ago — he gave a 
donation of d£2,000 to Magee College, Derry. His father was 
succeeded as minister of Aghadoey by the Eev. John Bx'own, 
who was ordained on the 11th of December, 1813. In 1820, 
Mr. Brown appeared before the public as an author. His 



12 HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

sermon on " The importance of learning to Society and the 
Christian Ministry," then issued from the press. In 1832 
he was chosen Moderator of the Synod of Ulster, and about 
that time commenced an agitation for an equalization of the 
Begium JDonum, which eventually proved successful. In 1839 
he received the degree of D.D. from the University of 
Edinburgh. Dr. Brown wrote numerous letters in the news- 
papers, and published several tracts and sermons. In 1844 
he was unanimously chosen Moderator of the General 
Assembly. He was never married, and lived to an advanced 
age. In 1872 he retired from the active duties of the 
ministry, and died on the 27th of March, 1873. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Alexander Wallace, who was ordaiued to 
the pastoral charge on the 6th of May, 1873. His ministry 
.was very short, as he died on the 14th of July, 1874. He 
was succeeded by the Eev. James B. Huston, formerly 
minister of 1st Eandalstown, who was installed here on the 
22nd of December, 1874. 

AHOGHILL 1st. 

The first minister we find here was John Shaw, who was 
ordained in May, 1658. He was deposed by the bishop in 
the year 1661, but continued privately to ofiiciate among his 
people. In February, 1674, Adam Strehorn, commissioner 
to the presbytery, reported that " though the charge be gi'eat 
and vast, yet the quota to the minister is small, being con- 
siderably short of ^30 per annum, and that even of it there 
are arrears due." Mr. Shaw died in 1674-5, and his successor, 
M. Haltridge, was ordained here on March 8th, 1676. A 
visitation was held here in 1790, when it appeared "that the 
arrears due to Mr. Haltridge were =£177, that all was desperate 
but about ,£12, and that they could only secure £,21 for the 
next year." He continued in this charge till his death, which 
occurred October 20th, 1705. His successor was Thomas 
Shaw, ordained here December 20th, 1710. He became a 
member of the Non- Subscribing Presbytery of Antrim in 
1726, in whose communion he died in October, 1731. In 
1732 the congregation applied to the Synod of Ulster, stating 
that they were about 200 families, and wished to be joined 
to the Presbytery of Route. The request was granted, and 
supplies were ordered. Their next minister was Mr. John 
Semple, ordained here June 1st, 1736. The same year the 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 13 

Synod ordered a collection through all their churches to aid 
the people of Ahoghill in erecting their meeting-house. In 
1749 Mr. Semple was removed to Anahilt, and was succeeded 
here by Mr. James Ker, formerly minister at Pettigo, who 
was installed here in the beginning of 1753. He died in this 
charge September 18th, 1757. The next minister was Mr. 
James Cuming, ordained here October 14th, 1760. He was 
grand-uncle to Professor Gibson of Belfast. Becoming infirm, 
Mr. Joseph Howard was ordained his assistant and successor 
June 20th, 1808. Mr. Cuming died March 3rd, 1809, leaving 
a widow, but no family. Mr. Howard died on the 2nd of 
May, 1810. The next minister was Mr. George M'Clelland, 
ordained December 24th, 1810. Mr. M'Clelland having 
retired from the discharge of the active duties of his congrega- 
tion, Mr. David Adams was ordained his assistant and 
successor on the 8th of June, 1841. Mr. M'Clelland died on 
the 15th of February, 1850. Mr. Adams died on the 6th of 
March, 1880, and was succeeded by Mr. William Colcjuhoun, 
who was ordained here on the 18th of January, 1881. 

ANAGHLONE 1st. 

This congregation was established by the Seceders about 
the beginning of this centuiy. Its first minister was Mr. 
David M'Kee. His ministry was of great length, extending 
to sixty-six years. Mr. M'Kee died on the 12th of Januarv, 
1867, and was succeeded by Mr. John Waddell, who was 
ordained here on the 31st December, 1867. Mr. Waddell, 
on his removal to Belfast, demitted this charge on the 4th 
of April, 1876, and was succeeded by Mr. David T. Mackey, 
who was ordained here on the 24th of October of the same 
year. 

ANAGHLONE 2nd. 

In 1819 certain inhabitants of the Parish of Anaghlone, 
who had hitherto adhered to the congregation of Lough- 
brickland, applied to the Synod of Ulster to be erected into 
a separate charge. Leave was granted to them to build a 
meeting-house, and the Presbytery of Dromore was appointed 
to supply them with preaching as they should see cause. In 
1820 they were erected into a congregation, and their first 
minister was Mr. Samuel Crawford, who was ordained here 
on the 21st of June, 1821. He resigned this charge on the 



14 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

22nd of August, 1822, and removed to a congregation in 
Leeds, England. After inuch altercation and frequent 
appeals to the Synod, Mr. Alexander Orr was ordained here 
on August 5th, 1824, by a Committee of the Synod of Ulster. 
In 1827 this congregation was annexed to the Presbytery of 
Armagh. On the 11th of September, 1838, Mr. Orr resigned 
the charge of this congregation, and removed to Ballyhemlin, 
under the care of the Remonstrant Synod. He was succeeded 
by Mr. William Dobbin, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Dromore on the 19th of June, 1839. 

ANAHILT. 

This congregation was sometimes called Hillsborough. 
We find Mr. John M'Broom settled here before the Revolu- 
tion. He died in 1682, as appears from the tomb-stone still 
to be seen in Anahilt graveyard. It is there stated that his 
ministry was of twenty years duration. Some disputes about 
the boundaries of the congregation and that of Lisburn arose 
in 1696. In those days people were required to go to the 
meeting-house of the district, and not to another at a greater 
distance, even though they greatly preferred the distant 
minister. In 1697 perambulators were appointed by the 
Synod of Ulster to settle these disputes between Anahilt and 
Lisburn about boundaries ; but in 1698 we find the people 
of Blaris supplicating the Synod of Ulster to be rejoined to 
Lisburn, " finding by experience their annexation to Hills- 
borough (as it was then called) to be extremely inconvenient." 
The next minister, after Mr. M'Broom, of whom we have any 
account in this charge was Mr. James Ramsay, who had 
pi'eviously supplied Maghera, and who appears to have been 
ordained here shortly after the Revolution. He was present 
at the Synod in June, 1694. He died February 24th, 1708. 
The next minister was Mr. Charles Seaton, who was ordained 
here December 9th, 1708. He died in this charge August 
27th, 1737. He was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Simms, who 
was ordained here June 18th, 1739. He removed to Tullylish 
in November, 1746, and was succeeded by Mr. John Sample, 
formerly minister of Ahoghill, who was installed here by the 
Presbytery of Di'omore on the 7th of June, 1749, Mr. 
Semple took an active part in the controversy with the 
Seceders, then beginning to establish congregations, and 
published a pamphlet, which obtained extensive circulation, 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 15 

entitled " The Survey Impartially Examined," in answer to 
another pamphlet entitled " A Brief Survey." He died in 
this charge March 24th, 1758. The next minister was Mr. 
Eobert M'Clure, who was ordained here on the 29th of April* 
1760. Becoming infirm, Mr. William Wright was ordained 
his assistant and successor on the 24th of June, 1802. Mr. 
M'Clure died May 11th, 1823, leaving a family. Mr. Wrio-htj 
commonly called Dr. Wright, becoming infirm, Mr. Thomas 
Greer, son of the minister of Dunboe, was ordained assistant 
and successor on the 17th of January, 1839. Mr. Wrio-ht 
died August 20th, 1844, in the 73rd year of his age. 

ANTEIM 1st. 

The first minister here was John Ridge, an Englishman, 
who had been admitted to the oi-der of deacon on the 8th of 
March, 1611, by the Bishop of Oxford, and was instituted to 
the vicarage of Antrim, July 7th, 1619, on the presentation 
of Arthur Lord Chichester. He was deposed August 12th, 
1636, by Leslie, Bishop of Down and Connor, and flying to 
Scotland, died shortly after at Irvine. In April, 1642, John 
Livingston spent six weeks at Antrim, entertained by Sir 
John Clotworthy, and held the communion there. They gave 
him a call, but he would not accept it. Archibald Ferguson 
was ordained here by the Presbytery about 1645. In 1646 
he was Moderator of the Presbytery of Antrim, and presided 
at the ordination of Kennedy, at Templepatrick. He was 
imprisoned by Venables in Carrickfergus in June, 1650, and 
summoned to Dublin in 1653. He died the following year. 
He was succeeded by James Cunningham, son of Mr. Cun- 
ningham, of Holywood, who died, as his tomb-stone relates, 
minister of Antrim, October 2nd, 1670. In July, 1671, they 
called Thomas Gowan, formerly minister of Glasslough, who 
appears to have been eugaged in supplying Connor from 1667. 
The following reasons were drawn up in Ajjril, 1672, in favour 
of his removal and settlement at Antrim : — 1. The j^arish of 
Antrim being more considerable than Glasslough. 2. The 
unhealthfulness of his body in his former place. 3. His 
usefulness in philosophy, and the accommodation in Antrim 
for his scholars. 4. The great difiiculty of planting Antrim 
in the person of another with consent of all parties. These 
reasons j)revailed, and his relation to Glasslough was formally 
loosed in August, 1672. Shortly after we find him comijlaining 



16 HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

to the Presbytery of want of a pi-eachmg-liouse. It may 
be here noticed that the celebrated John Howe came to 
Antrim in May, 1671, as chaplain to Lord Massereene, that 
he assisted the Presbytery, and joined with them in their 
proceedings, and that he continued here till 1676, when he 
removed to London. When in Antrim he often pi-eached in 
the parish church. In February, 1673, Mr. Gowan also had 
liberty offered him to preach there, through the influence of 
Lord Massereene, and the propriety of his accepting the 
offer was discussed at the subsequent meeting in March in 
these terms : — " A case being propounded by Mr. Thomas 
Gowan concerning an offer of liberty to him to preach in the 
church, the question was put whether, if Mr. Gowan should 
embrace this liberty, so that the people who own him be not 
ensnared to countenance the liturgy, or to profane the 
Sabbath by attending at the church door when it is reading, 
and withal, so that a considerable number of the people do 
not absent themselves from the public ordinances in the 
congregation ; whether, these cautions being observed, the 
brethren will take offence at his practice ?" It was answered 
to this query, " That the brethren would not take offence." 
But in June the people of Muckamore complained of this 
arrangement, and the Presbytery met at Antrim in July to 
consider the business more fully, but did not come to any 
positive decision. They concluded, however, by stating 
" that, upon the whole matter, if it were not for their great 
respect for Lord Massereene and his family, they would be 
clear to advise Mr. Gowan to withdraw altogether from using 
the church." In consequence of this, Lord Massereene wrote 
to the Presbytery, in September, that he hoped to get all 
grievances and difficulties removed. In April, 1674, John 
White, elder, reports that they j^ay £,40 per annum stipend, 
and that the cause of the quota being so small was owing to 
its falling on the town, and little on the country. Mr. 
Gowan died in August, 1683, leaving a widow. In August, 
1684, they called Jo. Abernethy, but he having another call 
from Moneymore, accepted it in preference to Antrim. In 
October, 1686, they succeeded in obtaining Mr. John Ander- 
son, who was removed from Glenarm, and who continued 
with them till April, 1688, when he I'eturned to his former 
congregation in Scotland — a liberty which he had reserved 
for himself when he settled at Glenarm and Antrim. In 
July following they called Mr. William Adair, minister of 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 17 

Ballyeaston, but, the troubles soon coming on, tbis intended 
an-angement was interrupted. In May, li690, the Presbytery 
recommended to them Neil Grey, of Ologher, but the"^ con- 
gregation did not relish it, because they thought his voice 
was too low. They then pi-esented their call to Mr. Adair, 
and the Synod — the first that met in the North after the 
Eevolution — in September, 1690, countenanced them in it, 
and in November he was removed thither, the congregation 
promising him ^48 per annum. Mr. Adair died February 
14th, 1699. This same year they called Mr. James Kirk- 
patrick, afterwards of Belfast, but he had previously a call 
from Templepatrick. They at length succeeded in obtaining 
Mr. John Abernethy, son of Mr. Abernethy, of Coleraine, 
who was ordained here August 18th, 1703. In 1711 he had 
a call to Derry, but the Synod would not permit him to 
remove. In his time the Subscription controversy occurred. 
Mr. Abernethy was one of the leaders of the Non-subscribers ; 
and, in consequence, a schism took place in his congregation. 
In 1726 those dissatisfied with his proceedings were erected 
into a new congregation by the Synod of Ulster. In 1727 
the Synod granted them assistance to build their meeting- 
house. In 1728 their commissioners, Robert Eainey and 
David White, acknowledged the assistance they had received 
from several congi-egations. In 1729 they called Mr. Hemp- 
hill, minister of Castleblayney, but the Synod would not 
permit him to remove. They then supplicated for supply of 
probationers, which was granted, the congregation promising 
thirty shillings each month, with entertainment for man and 
horse. Their first minister was Mr. William Holmes, a 
licentiate of the Strabane Presbytery, who was ordained here 
by the Presbytery of Templepatrick, September 7th, 1730. 
In 1731 he had a controversy with Mr. Duchal, the minister 
of the Non-subscribing congregation. He died in this charge 
May 1st, 1750. He was succeeded by Mr. John Rankin, who 
was settled here October 16, 1751. Mr. Rankin died in this 
charge in 1789. He was succeeded by Mr. Alexander 
Montgomery, ordained here May 31st, 1791. He was sus- 
pended by the Presbytery in 1806 for two Lord's days for 
celebrating marriages irregularly. Becoming infirm, Mr. 
Robert Magill was ordained his assistant and successor June 
20th, 1820. Mr. Montgomery died October 19th, 1820, 
leaving a widow and family ; and Mr. Magill died on the 
19th of February, 1839. He was succeeded by Mr. Charles 



18 HISTORY OP CONGEEaATIONS. 

Morrison, who was ordained liei-e March 24th, 1840. Mr. 
Morrison demitted this charge on the 6th of September, 
1859, and was succeeded by Mr. George Magill, minister of 
Lylehill, who was installed here on the 20th of December, 
1859. Mr. Magill, having accepted a call from Cork, i-esigned 
the charge of this congregation on the 1st of May, 1867, and 
was succeeded by Mr. Thomas West, who was ordained here 
on the 20th of November of the same year, 

AEDGLASS. 

Ardglass, though now but a small place of little con- 
sequence, chiefly known in connection with the herring 
fishery, was, four or five hundred years ago, the second 
trading town on the eastern coast of Ulster. Carrickfergus 
then held the first rank. Presbyterianism never seems 
to have obtained any very broad footing in the neigh- 
bourhood of Ardglass. In 1697 the Synod of Ulster 
ordered that Bailee, Down, and Drumca or Clough, should 
be formed into two congregations. Bailee is only two or 
three miles distant from Ardglass; and in August, 1701, 
William Smith was ordained by the Presbytery of Down as 
minister of Bailee. He died in this charge in July, 1747. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Robert Smith, probably his son, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Killileagh on 
the 3rd October, 1750. He died June 15th, 1787, having 
obtained as his assistant and successor Mr. James Patterson, 
who was ordained here October 28th, 1782. He died in this 
charge on May 7th, 1798, leaving a widow and family. The 
next minister was Mr. Josiah Ker, who was ordained here 
March 18th, 1799. He resigned this charge in August 26, 
1809 ; and was afterwards suspended for immoral conduct. 
The next minister was Mr. David White, who was ordained 
here August 27, 1811. The Arian controversy soon after- 
wards commenced in the Synod of Ulster ; and in 1829 the 
Unitarians withdi'ew. Mr. White adhered to the separatists ; 
and, in consequence, the orthodox party were left for several 
years without a ministry. At length, about 1841, chiefly 
through the exertions of the late Dr. James Seaton Eeid, 
then Professor of Church History for the General Assembly, 
and the late Captain Rowan, of Downpatrick, a congregation 
was organised at Ardglass ; and, on the 31st of May, 1842, 
the Rev, Joseph Burns was ordained the j^astor. The con- 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 19 

gregation had then no place of worsliip, and tlie ordination 
took i>lace in one of the outbuildings connected with Ardglass 
House. Mr. Burns resigned the pastoral charge on the 13th 
of August, 1844 — having accepted a call from the congrega- 
tion of Whitehaven, England. On the 28th of March,"l845, 
Mr. Thomas Macafee was ordained to the charge. 

ARDSTEAW 1st. 

The first minister was Mr. William Moorcroft. The 
second minister of this congregation appears to have been 
Mr. Adam White. He had been settled in Fannet in 
1654, where he was deposed in 1661, and with three others 
Avas imprisoned by Leslie, bishop of Eaj^hoe, for six years. 
He resigned Fannet in 1672, and removed to Ardstraw, 
Avhich was vacant in 1671 — probably after the death of Mr. 
William Moorcroft, its first minister. In 1688 Mr. White 
fled to Scotland, whence by letters he demitted the charge 
to the Presbytery of Lagan in January, 1692, and afterwards 
settled at Billey, near Dunluce. Their next minister was 
Samuel Holyday or Haliday. He had been minister of 
Omagh, and retired to Scotland at the Eevolution. On his 
return, Omagh congregation declared its inability to support 
him ; and, ministers being then scarce, in November, 1692, 
he had calls from Donagheady, Urney, and Ardstraw. The 
two former offered <£30 per annum, to provide a farm for 
him, and build the necessary accommodation ; Ardstraw 
offered d£27 per annum, with 27 barrels of corn, and to 
advance half a year's salary to defray his charges in removing 
his family from Scotland. He accepted Ai'dstraw, and was 
installed here in December, 1692. He was the father of Dr. 
Haliday, minister of the 1st Congregation of Belfast, so 
famous in connection with the Subscription controversy. He 
died in February, 1724 ; but previously, in March, 1718, Mr. 
Isaac Taylor had been ordained here as his assistant and 
successor. In May, 1729, Mr. Taylor conformed to the 
Established Church. In 1731 the people called Mr. John 
Holmes, of Donegall, but the Synod opposed his removal. 
The next minister was Mr. Andrew Welsh, ordained here 
August 22nd, 1733. In 1736 an application was made to 
Synod by a discontented party for a new settlement, but the 
Synod refused to interfere. Disjjutes, however, continued ; 
and the Synod, in 1741, sanctioned a new erection at Clady, 



20 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

and put it under the care of the Presbytery of Letterkenny. 
Mr. Welsh died May 15th, 1781, leaving a widow and 
children. In October, 1779, Mr. Robert Clarke was ordained 
here as assistant and successor to Mr. Welsh. Mr. Clarke 
becoming infirm, Mr. Matthew Clarke was ordained his 
assistant and successor September 21st, 1820. Mr. R. 
Clarke died December 3rd, 1821, leaving neither widow nor 
family. On the 21st February, 1861, Mr. Leslie A. Lyle was 
ordained assistant and successor to Mr. M. Clarke. Mr. M. 
Clarke died on the 28th of December, 1875. 



ARMAGH 1st. 

Presbyterianism was first introduced into Armagh after 
the great rebellion of 1641. From " Goodall's Memoirs" it 
appears that Mr. Hoj^e Sherrid, who was minister here in 
1661, was deposed with his brethren by Bramhall. Worship 
was, however, continued in a private manner. We have no 
account of this congregation till we find Archibald Hamilton, 
son of James Hamilton, of Ballywalter, loosed from his 
charge in Benburb, in May, 1673, and thereafter settled in 
Armagh. At the time of the troubles in 1688, he retired to 
Scotland, and afterwards in 1692, at his own request, the 
Synod dissolved his connection with this congregation. He 
was then settled as minister at Killinchy. In 1694 the people 
of Armagh applied for Mr. Hutchison, minister of Down- 
patrick, and soon after, for the return of Mr. Hamilton ; but 
the Synod declined to accede to either of these applications. 
In 1697 they called Francis Iredell, minister of Donegore, 
but he declined their offer; and in the end of the same 
year they obtained John Hutchison, formerly minister of 
Downpatrick, and son of Alexander Hutchison, minister" of 
Saintfield. The second son of this minister of Armagh was 
the celebrated Dr. Francis Hutchison, Professor of Moral 
Philosophy in the University of Glasgow. Mr. Hutchison 
died on the 10th of February, 1729. In 1731 the congregation 
applied for the removal of James Bond (ancestor of Captain 
Bond, of Farra, County Longford) , who was then minister of 
Longford ; but the Synod would not sanction this translation. 
Mr. John Maxwell, son of the minister of Omagh, was ordained 
here March 15th, 1732. Mr. Maxwell, who had much in- 
fluence during his time in the Synod of Ulster, died on the 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 21 

IStli of December, 1763. In December, 1764, tlie famous 
William Campbell, D.D., was installed his successor. Dr. 
Camj^bell bad been minister of Antrim where he was ordained 
in 1759. He was an excellent scholar and a vigorous writer. 
He attracted much attention by a controversy in which he 
was engaged with the Bishop of Cloyne. In 1772 it was 
reported to Synod that Arthur Graham, Esq., had bequeathed 
d£'130 for the use of the ministers of Armagh, which sum, 
with additional subscriptions, was laid out in building a 
manse on a tenement which had been granted for lives 
renewable for ever, in December, 1768. In 1730 a large 
tenement was taken for three lives from Mr. Maxwell, after- 
wards Lord Farnham, on part of which the meeting-house 
stood and also the manse ; the rest was given up to John 
Johnston, Esq., for valuable consideration. The manse was 
built dui-ing the ministry of Dr. Campbell. This gentleman 
removed from Armagh to Clonmel in 1789 and died there 
November 17th, 1805. His successor in Armagh was Mr. 
"William Henry, formerly minister of Stewartstown, who was 
installed here July 14th, 1791, but in May, 1795, he was 
suspended sine die. He was succeeded by Mr. Thomas 
Cuming, father of Dr. Cuming, of Armagh, and uncle of 
Professor Gibson, of Belfast. Mr. Cuming, who had formerly 
been minister of 1st Dromore, was installed here January 9th, 
1796, and died August 19th, 1816. He was for many years 
the clerk of the Synod of Ulster, and was brother-in-law of 
the celebrated Dr. Black, of Derry. The next minister was 
Samuel Eccles, who was ordained here June 16th, 1817, and 
who died February 21st, 1823. After a protracted vacancy, 
Mr. P, S. Henry (son of the minister of Eandalstown), was 
ordained here December 7th, 1826. On the 2nd of February, 
1846, Mr. Henry, afterwards D.D., resigned the charge of 
1st Armagh, in consequence of his appointment as President 
of Queen's College, Belfast ; and on the 17th of April, 1846, 
Mr. Alexander Fleming was installed as his successor. 
On the 17th of November, 1851, Mr. Fleming died; and 
was succeeded by Mr. John Hall, who was installed on 
the 30th of January, 1852. On the 17th of August, 
1858, Mr. Hall, now D.D., of New York, resigned the 
pastoral charge, and removed to Dublin ; and on the 27th 
of June, 1859, Mr. Jackson Smyth, now D.D., was installed 
as his successor. 



22 HISTORY OF CONGKEGATIONS, 



AEMAGH 3ed. 



This congregation was erected by the Presbytery of 
Armagh in connection with the Synod of Ulster in November, 
1837. The first minister was Mr. John Richard M'Alister, 
formerly minister of Ballygrainey, who was installed here 
on the 13th of June, 1838. Mr. M'Alister died on the 27th 
of June, 1871, and was succeeded by Mr. T. B. Meharry, 
formerly minister of Moy. Mr. Meharry was installed as 
minister of 3rd Armagh on the 9th of October, 1871. On 
the 2nd of March, 1875, Mr. Meharry resigned the charge of 
this congregation, having accepted a call from the congrega- 
tion of Trinity Church, Newcastle-oh-Tyne ; and on the 30th 
of June, 1875, Mr. John Elliott, formerly minister of 
Donoughmore, County Down, was installed as the pastor. 



AEMOT. 

This congregation was erected in 1768 by the Presbytery 
of Eoute, The Synod of that year disapproved of the erec- 
tion, but permitted the Presbytery, if they saw cause, to 
supply the place till next meeting. In 1769 the peojile sent 
John Neal and Hugh Fulton as commissioners to the Synod, 
and the Synod appointed a committee of its members to meet 
at Ballywillan and determine the propriety of the erection. 
The erection was thus sanctioned ; and the first minister was 
Mr. Hugh M'Clelland, who was ordained here June 10th, 
1771. He died in this charge in October, 1813, leaving a 
widow and family. He was succeeded by Mr. Jackson 
Graham, who was ordained here August 15th, 1814. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. John M'Dermott was ordained his assistant on 
the 24th of February, 1869. Mr. Graham died on the 9th 
of January, 1880. Mr. M'Dermott resigned the pastoral 
charge on the 7th of October, 1873, on his removal to 
Strabane ; and, on the 22nd of July, 1874, Mr. William J. 
Thomson was ordained here. On the 15th of October, 1879, 
Mr. Thomson resigned the charge, having accepted a call 
from the Free Church congregation of Bridgeton, Glasgow ; 
and, on the 18th of August, 1880, Mr. John Milliken was 
ordained as minister of this congregation. 



HISTORY OF CONGKEGATIONS. 23 



ATHLONE. 

In 1704 Major Thomas Handock supjjlicated the Synod of 
Ulster to send supplies of preaching to Athlone. On this 
occasion it appeared that it had already been visited by 
Presbyterian pi-eachers. As an encouragement to a minister 
to settle among them, the people offered =£30 per annum and 
a farm of twenty-five acres free, and free accommodation to 
the minister so long as he remained unmarried. They did 
not, however, succeed in obtaining a minister until 1708, 
when Mr. Samuel Dunlop was ordained here by the Presby- 
tery of Monaglian on the 29th of April of that year. His 
support was but scanty, and in 1722 he resigned the charge 
because of insufficient maintenance. For a long time Athlone 
remained without any stated Presbyterian ministry ; but in 
1836 the congregation was i*evived, and the Rev. E. H. 
Allen, formerly minister of Hilltown, was installed here on 
the 29th of March, 1837. Mr. Allen died on the 18th of 
July, 1849 ; and on the 25th of March, 1851, the Rev. James 
Mawhinney was installed as minister here. On his appoint- 
ment as an army chaplain, Mr. Mawhinney resigned this 
charge on the 3rd of April, 1861 ; and was succeeded by the 
Rev. S. E. Brown, who was installed here on the 18th of 
June, 1861. Mr. Brown resigned this charge on the 5th of 
November, 1878, having accepted a call from the congrega- 
tion of Clough, in the County of Antrim. He was succeeded 
by Mr. Robert Watson, who was ordained here on the 5th of 
August, 1879. 

AIJaHNACLOY. 

The first minister was Mr. Baptist Boyd, who was ordained 
here some time before the year 1697. He died in this charge 
November 25th, 1749. He was succeeded by Hugh Mulligan, 
formerly minister of Bailieborough, who was installed here 
October 13th, 1757. He died January 1st, 1786. The next 
minister was Mr. James Davison, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Clogher to the joint charges of Aughnacloy 
and Ballygawley July 10th, 1787. He was suspended for 
two months in June and July, 1811, and finally resigned this 
joint charge on the 19th of August, 1811. He was succeeded 
by Mr. John Anderson, who was ordained to the same charge 



24 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

June 23rd, 1812, Mr. Davison died February 3rd, 1813, 
leaving a widow and family ; and Mr. Anderson died May 
16th, 1829, leaving a widow. At Mr. Anderson's death, 
Ballygawley was separated from Auglmacloy, and each 
became a separate congregation. Mr. John Henderson was 
then chosen to the pastoral charge of Aughnacloy, and was 
ordained here on the 8th of October, 1830. On the Ilth of 
May, 1842, Mr. Henderson demitted the cai-e of the congrega- 
tion, and on the 14th of February, 1843, the Kev. William 
M'llwain was ordained to the pastoral charge. 



BADONEY. 

The first notice we have of this congregation is in connec- 
tion with the ordination of Mr. Alexander M'Cracken, who 
was set apart to this charge on the 26th of July, 1710. He 
appears to have been educated at the University of Glasgow, 
where, as we learn from the college registry, Alexander 
M'Cracken, Scoto Hyhernus matriculated on the 27th of 
February, 1702. Mr. M'Cracken was minister of Badoney 
upwards of thirty years. He died in September, 1743, and 
was succeeded by Mr. Hugh M'Cracken, probably his son, 
who Avas ordained here June 4th, 1761. He at length 
demitted this charge, and resided at Carrickfergus, within 
the bounds of the Presbytery of Templepatrick, where he 
conducted himself imprudently, and in 1775 he was dep»osed 
by the Synod for irregular marriages. In 1768 we find Mr. 
Joseph Coulter minister of this congregation. Mr. Coulter 
died in 1789. He was succeeded by Mr. William Dunlop, 
who was ordained here March 15th, 1790. In 1798 he 
removed to Strabane, and was succeeded by Mr. Charles 
Hemphill, who was ordained here February 21st, 1799. Mr. 
Hemphill becoming infirm, the Eev. Thomas Johnston was 
ordained as his assistant on the 16th of June, 1843. Mr. 
Hemphill died on the 13th of January, 1844. Mr. Johnston 
died on the 1st of September, 1875; and on the 19th of 
January following, Mr. John Boyd was ordained here. On 
the 26th of November, 1880, Mr. Boyd resigned the pastoral 
charge, having accepted a call from the congregation of 
Portaferry; and on the 31st of May, 1881, Mr. Jackson 
M'Fadden was installed here. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 25 

BAILIEBOEOUGH 1st. 

The first minister of this congregation of whom we have 
any account was Mr. David Simm, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Monaghan March 25th, 1714. In 1724 
he had a call to Carlow, and the Synod of Ulster permitted 
him to remove. He was succeeded by Mr. Wilson, who was 
ordained here December 20th, 1726, after which he was 
joined to the Presbytery of Dublin. In 1732 the people 
stated to the Synod that they were able to pay him but d£12 
per annum. He died in this charge November 11th, 1735. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Mulligan, who was ordained 
here July 27th, 1742. He removed to Aughnacloy in 
October, 1757. The next minister was Mr. Alexander M'Kee, 
formerly minister of Drum, who removed here May 4th, 
1761, and died the 13th of the same month. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Jo. Mathewson, who was ordained here by the 
Presbyteiy of Cootehill February 10th, 1762. He resigned 
this charge October 3rd, 1780. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Robert Montgomery, who was ordained here by the Presbytery 
of Monaghan June 5th, 1781. He died January 1st, 1803, 
leaving a widow and family. The next minister was Mr. 
John Kelso, who was ordained here February 7th, 1804. He 
died March 23rd, 1810, leaving neither widow nor family, 
and was succeeded by Mr. Patrick White, who was ordained 
here August 28th, 1810. In 1819 the minister, session, and 
congregation applied to the Synod of Ulster for their support 
in defending their title to a farm set apart for the benefit of 
the pastor, upwards of one hundred years before, by the 
proprietor, Mr. Hamilton, of Bailieborough. The Synod 
agreed, and the suit was gained. The farm thus secured is, 
perhaps, the most valuable glebe belonging to any congrega- 
tion connected with the Presbyterian Church in Ireland ; and 
Mr. White gained great credit for the integrity and zeal 
with which he contended for the conservation of the property. 
Mr. White died on the 17th of January, 1862, and on the 
13th of March following, his son, the Rev. Patrick White, 
who had been minister of Donoughmore, was invested with 
the pastoral charge. On the 7th of October, 1873, Mr. 
Patrick White, having received a call from a congregation in 
Liverpool, resigned this charge ; and Mr. Thomas K. White 
was installed as pastor. 



26 HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

BALLACOLLA. 

After the famine of 1847-50, a few Scotclamen took farms 
from Lord De Vesci near Abbeyleix, and Lord Castletown 
near Eathdowney. These families were occasionally visited 
by Eev. H. M'Manus, of Mountmellick, but no attempt was 
made to organize a congregation for some time. A lady has 
the credit of doing that. The young wife of Mr. Jonathan 
Millie, Abbeyleix, a Scotchwoman, feeling the want of the 
simple form of Presbyterian worship, to which she had 
always been accustomed, and seeing if the two little colonies 
of Presbyterians, only a few miles separated, could be united 
by meeting to worship at a central point, there was the 
nucleus of a substantial congregation. She visited each, and 
obtained their adherence to her plan. She and her husband 
afterwards waited on the late James G-ibson, Q.C, the 
chairman of Queen's County, when on his Sessions Circuit, 
who entered heartily into the jDlan, and by his wise counsel 
the matter was brought to a successful issue. Messrs. 
Millie and Purves attended the next meeting of Dublin 
Presbytery with a memoi'ial for organization. The Presby- 
tery, after due inquiry, granted the request, and formed 
them into a congregation on 7th April, 1858. The coui-thouse 
of Ballacolla was applied for and granted to hold public 
worship on every Sabbath until a church would be erected ; 
and supplies were sent. No Presbyterian family resided at 
the small village of Ballacolla, but it was a central point for 
the members to meet. Three acres of land at a nominal 
rent, with lease for 999 years, was obtained close to the 
village from Richard Caldbeck, Esq., J. P. A substantial 
church was erected, and opened, free of debt, by Eev. H. 
Cooke, D.D., LL.D., Belfast, on 22nd March, 1860, and the 
week after, on 27th March, Mr. Alexander Milligan, a 
licentiate of Newry Presbytery, was ordained the first minister 
of this charge, Eev. J. Elliott, of Armagh, taking part. The 
Eev. John Hall, D.D., then of Dublin, gave the charge on 
the interesting occasion. It was upwards of two years after 
this when the manse was built and ready for the minister to 
occupy. It was gratifying to all that when finished both 
church and manse were free of debt, showing the liberality 
with which the people contributed ; they wei'e aided also by 
a grant from the Church and Manse Fund. The strong 
Presbyterianism of Mrs. Millie was shown in the blue cloth, 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 27 

with blue trimmings, she put on the pulpit. A member of 
the Purves family presented a superbly-bound pulpit bible 
and psalm book. As all the members of Ballacolla congre- 
gation live at a distance from the church, and ride or drive 
to worship, they were greatly inconvenienced for accommoda- 
tion for their horses in the village till Mr. George Purves, 
the secretary, aided by other members of the congregation, 
built stables sufficient for them all, and handed over the 
building, a free gift, to the congregation. A call from the 
congregation of Corlea, Bailieborough, came to Mr. Milligan, 
which he accepted, and resigned the pastorate of Ballacolla 
on 7th March, 1882. The congregation next called Mr. 
Alexander Mogee, a licentiate of Route Presbytery, who 
was ordained here on 7th August, 1882. 

BALLINDEERY. 

The first settlement in this neighbourhood was at Glenavy. 
In February, 1672, the Presbytery of Antrim, considering 
the need the people had of preaching, sent one of their 
number to examine what encouragement there was for the 
settlement of a minister. In April of that year, Robert 
Scott and John Johnson appeared as commissioners at the 
Presbytery, and they were recommended to make arrange- 
ments for building a meeting-house and manse. In August 
the people obtained a hearing of Mr. Archibald Yoimg, a pro- 
bationer; and they presented him with a call in the September 
following, promising to give him ^30 per annum, and to 
provide him with a house and garden. He proceeded with 
his second trials ; but, in May, 1673, he had a call to Down- 
patrick, which the Presbytery permitted him to accept, and he 
removed there in June. In September of the same year the 
people presented a call to Mr. Matthew Haltridge, which he 
accepted; and, in February, 1674, their commissioner, John 
Ferguson, promised for his support =£25 per annum, with a 
sufficiency of turf and a manse. With the exception of a 
visit to Cork in June and July, he continued to supply the 
congregation till December, when, the people having failed 
in their promises to him, the Presbytery freed him from the 
charge of this place. He was afterwards settled at Ahoghill ; 
and Grlenavy was thus again left vacant. In January, 1683, 
we find Mr. David Airth settled in this parish, having been 
ordained here some time in the interval between 1675 and 



28 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

tliat date. His support being small and badly paid, he is 
declared transportable in August, 1685 ; and, in June, 1694, 
lie removed to a charge in Scotland. The congregation was 
now long vacant. The next minister, Mr. John Riddel, was 
ordained by the Presbytery of Belfast on the 12th of March, 
1701. In 1712 he was prosecuted as a non-juror. In 1713 
the congregation of Ballinderry, as it at present exists, was 
formed — part from Glenavy and some from Moira — whilst 
the greater part of Glenavy was incorporated into a later 
erection at Crumlin. The commissioners from Ballinderry 
to the Synod were Arthur Maxwell, Esq., a great benefactor 
of the Irish Presbyterian Church ; Dr. Ferguson, and 
Thomas Beatty. Their first minister, after their separation, 
was Mr. John Hasty, who was ordained here June 11th, 1724. 
He died in this charge on the 6th of April, 1743. Their next 
minister was Mr. Clotworthy Dobbin, ordained here February 
5th, 1746, but in the following year he was removed to 
Ballynure. He was succeeded by Mr. William Rowan, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Bangor on the 30th 
of October, 1751. In 1783 he demitted his charge, and was 
succeeded by Mr. Robert Carlisle, who was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Belfast in September, 1784. In May, 1794, 
on account of indisposition, the Presbytery disannexed him 
from this charge, and Mr. William Whitlaw was ordained 
his successor on the first Tuesday of August, 1794. Mr. 
Whitlaw becoming infirm, Mr. John Shaw was ordained his 
assistant and successor on the 6th of February, 1826. Mr. 
Shaw resigned his charge here in 1831, and removed to 
Ballynahinch. The next assistant to Mr. Whitlaw was Mr. 
Henry Leebody, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Belfast on the 17th of April, 1833. Mr. Whitlaw died 
January 11th, 1836. Mr. Leebody having become infirm, 
Mr. James Meeke was ordained his assistant and successor 
on the 24th of May, 1877. Mr. Leebody died in May, 1879. 

BALLINDREAT. 

This congregation was formerly known by the name of 
LifEord. Its first minister appears to have been Mr. William 
Traill. He came from Scotland as a probationer in 1671, 
and was secretly ordained here the next year. Being much 
persecuted, he fled to Scotland about 1682. His successor 
was Mr. John Rowat. Mr. Rowat was in Derry during the 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 29 

memorable siege, He died January 4th, 1694. He was 
succeeded by Mr. James Pringle, who was ordained here ou 
the 27th November, 1695. He demittedthis charge in July, 
1699, and removed to Moy water (now Killala), in Mayo. 
The next minister was Mr. John Ball, who was ordained here 
September 25th, 1706. He died in this charge August 22nd, 
1739. The next minister was Mr. John Marshall, who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Letterkenny, July 27th, 
1743. He died in this charge in the first week of May, 1795, 
leaving a family. After much disputing, the people obtained 
for their minister, Mr. James Houston, who was ordained 
here on the 10th of July, 1799. About this time a species of 
theological institute had been established at Strabane, con- 
ducted by the Eev. William Crawford, D.D., the minister of 
that place, and Mr. Houston was one of the students educated 
in that seminary. Becoming infirm, Mr. William M'Crea 
was ordained as assistant and successor to Mr. Houston by 
the Presbytery of Eaphoe, on the 20th of June, 1838. Mr. 
Houston died November 27th, 1839. On the 31st of January, 
1871, Mr. M'Crea was suspended from the office of the 
ministry; and on the 18th of December, 1872, Mr. James 
MTarland Guy was ordained to the pastoral charge of this 
congregation. 

BALLYBAY 1st. 

The first minister of this congregation of whom we have 
any account was Mr. Humphrey Thompson, who seems to have 
been ordained here about 1698. He died in this charge 
April 7th, 1744. The next minister was Mr, Alexander 
Wadsworth, who was ordained as assistant and successor to 
Mr. Thompson January 19th, 1744. Mr. Wadsworth died, 
after a short ministry, on the 31st of March, 1747, and was 
succeeded by Mr. James Jackson, who was ordained February 
21st, 1750. He demitted the charge through bodily indis- 
position in May, 1781, and died in September, 1792, leaving 
a widow and family. He was succeeded by Mr. John Arnold, 
who was ordained here December 18th, 1782. Mi". Arnold 
removed to America in 1797. After great disputes, Mr. 
James Morell was ordained here August 6th, 1799. He died 
in this charge on the 31st of August, 1831, leaving a widow 
and family. Of his sons, two are now ministers of the 
Assembly, the Eev. John Morell of Second Ballybay and 
the Eev. Charles L. Morell (now D.D.) of Dungannon, one 



30 HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

of the ex-Moderators of the Assembly. After the death of 
Mr. James Morell, the congregation divided into two parts. 
Over First Ballybay, Mr. William Gibson (afterwards D.D. 
and Professor of Christian Ethics in the Assembly's College, 
Belfast), was ordained on the 1st of January, 1834. On the 
29th of October, 1840, he resigned the charge, having received 
a call to Rosemary Street Congregation, Belfast. He was 
succeeded in Ballybay by Mr. Joseph Crawford, who was 
ordained here on the 23rd of August, 1842. Mr. Crawford 
resigned the charge on the 5th November, 1844, and was 
succeeded by Mr. John Moran, who was ordained on the 24th 
of March, 1846, and who, on the 27th of the following 
October, resigned the charge, having received a call from 1st 
Newry. He was succeeded by Mr. John Gordon Smith, who 
was ordained here on the 28th of September, 1847. 

BALLYBAY 2nd. 

This congregation was established upwards of forty years 
ago. After the death of , Mr. James Morell, who died, 
minister of Ballybay, on the 31st of August, 1831, a division 
took place among the people. A new j^lace of worship was 
erected near the town of Ballybay, and Mr. John Harris 
Morell, son of the former minister, was ordained to the 
pastoral charge of 2nd Ballybay on the 2nd of January, 1834. 
Mr. Morell has obtained leave to resign. 

BALLYCARRY. 

This congregation was formerly better known by the name 
of Broadisland. It is confessedly one of the oldest, perhaps 
the very oldest, of the Irish Presbyterian congregations. Its 
first minister, Mr. Edward Brice, had been minister of Drymen, 
in Stirlingshire, whence he was obliged to fly to Ireland to 
escape the severities of Spotswood, a Scotch prelate, notorious 
as a persecutor. Mr. Brice settled in Broadisland about 
1611, under the sanction of his countryman Echlin, Bishop 
of Down and Connor. He preached in the parish church, 
and enjoyed the tithes, though he came under no engagement 
to use the Liturgy or conform to the discipline of the 
Episcopal Church. In 1634 the Calvinistic Confession, 
adopted in 1615 by the Reformed Church of Ireland, was set 
aside, and a series of canons requii-ing strict conformity was 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 31 

adopted. Mr. Brice was some time afterwards assailed for 
uon-conf ormity, and a seuteuce of deposition was pronounced 
on him, but he died before the sentence could be carried into 
effect. All Presbyterian ministers were now driven out of 
the country, and multitudes of the laity fled to Scotland to 
escape the imposition of the Black Oath. But they were 
thus providentially taken away from the evil to come ; for 
whilst a considerable number of the Episcoj^al clergy perished 
in the Irish massacre of 1641, not a single Presbyterian 
minister suffered any injury, for they had all before been 
obliged to take refuge in Scotland. In 1645 Mr. Robert 
Cunningham, son of Mr. Cunningham, of Holy wood, was 
ordained in Ballycany. In June, 1673, a complaint was 
made to the Presbytery that the j^eople were paying no 
rent for the building which they used as a place of worship, 
whereupon they agreed to pay the arrears demanded, 
and to commence the erection of a meeting-house for them- 
selves. In April, 1674, the state of their congregational 
accounts was reported to the Presbytery, from which it 
appeai'ed that they had been making very little provision for 
the support of the minister. About that time the first grant 
of Begium Bonum was made to the Irish Presbyterian 
ministers, and, probably, many of the people imagined that 
they did not require to supplement it. At the same meeting 
Matthew Logan and George Straight aj^peai'ed as commis- 
sioners from the congregation, and informed the Presbytery 
that " they were laying down a way for securing their 
minister <£30 per annum for the future." In May, 1688, 
Mr. Haltridge, of Islandmagee, was appointed to inquire into 
the state of Mr. Cunningham's maintenance ; and in June it 
is reported that the " Laird of Duntreath " wrote to Mr. 
Henry, of Carrickfergus, showing " that the people are now 
very poor ; but that, if trading come in, he will be as active 
as may be in stirring up the people ; and, as for himself, he 
promises to do what he did for Mr. Pitcairn in Ballymena." 
Mr. Cunningham continued in this charge till his death in 
1698. Mr. James Cobham was the next minister. He was 
ordained here about 1 700. He died in this charge February 
23rd, 1759. He was succeeded by Mr. John Bankhead, who 
was ordained here August 16th, 1763. Becoming infirm, 
Mr. William Glendy was ordained as his assistant and suc- 
cessor on the 30th July, 1812. In 1829 Mr. Glendy, who 
avowed himself an Arian, seceded from the Synod of Ulster, 



32 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

■with a portion of the congregation. The people adhering to 
the Synod gave a call to Mr. John Stuart, who was ordained 
to this charge by the Presbytery of Templepatrick on the 
3rd of April,"l832. Mr. Bankhead— who was the father of 
Dr. Bankhead, the celebrated physician, in whose arms the 
famous Lord Londonderry expired — died July 5th, 1833, after 
having been in this charge seventy years all but forty-two 
days. Mr. Stuart died on the 6th of February, 1880 ; and 
was succeeded by Mr. John Dickson, who was ordained here 
on the 27th of July, 1880. 

BALLYCASTLE. 

The Presbyterians of the town of Ballycastle, in the County 
of Antrim, formerly worshipped at Ramoan. Tliey were at 
length erected into a separate congregation by the Presbytery 
of Eoute in the beginning of the year 1827. Their first 
minister was Mr. Samuel Lyle, who was ordained hei'e on the 
4th of March, 1829. At the meeting of Assembly in 1866, 
Mr. Lyle obtained leave for the congregation to choose au 
assistant and successor, and on the 19th of June, 1867, Mr. 
George M'Farland was ordained there by the Presbytery of 
Route. Mr. Lyle died on the 26th of August, 1868. Mr. 
M'Farland, on his appointment as Mission Secretary to the 
General Assembly, in June, 1882, resigned the pastoral 
charge, and was succeeded by Mr. John Jackson, formerly 
minister of Cloughwater, who was installed here on the 26th 
of October of the same year. 

BALLYCLARE. 

The first minister of this congregation of whom we have 
any account was Mr. Gilbert Simpson, who was ordained here 
August 9th, 1655. He was here in 1662. The next minister 
was Mr. Robert Patton. He was here in 1671, and probably 
for a considerable time before. We find him going on a visit 
to Scotland, with the leave of the Presbytery, in July, 1674, 
and returning in the November following. In June, 1675, 
John M'CuUy and John Wilson appeared as commissioners 
at the Presbytery, " acknowledging great deficiency in the 
paying of their minister ; and proposing that if the meeting 
would condescend to remove the able unwilling party of the 
parish from any particular inspection of their minister, their 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 33 

able willing party would augment their several proportions, 
and endeavour to maintain him." The Presbytery, however, 
would not agree to the proposal. Mr. Patton, in conjunction 
with Mr. Gowan, of Antrim, was sent to Dublin in 1679 to 
satisfy Government that the Presbyterians in the North did 
not approve of the proceedings of the Scotch Covenanters, 
then just defeated at Both well Bridge. But, about this time, 
the famous Willie Gilliland, who was at the battle of 
Bothwell Bridge, had taken refuge in Glenwherry, and was 
hunted from place to place by the troopers stationed at 
Carrickfergus. Mr. Patton died shortly after his return 
from Dublin. His successor was Thomas Tuft, who was 
ordained here on December 7th, 1681. He died in December, 
1713. He had previously become infirm; and Mr. Thomas 
Wilson, a licentiate of the Presbytery of Kircaldy, was 
ordained here as his assistant and successor on the 27th of 
February, 1711. In 1725 Mr. Wilson joined the Presbytery 
of Antrim. He was degraded in 1757. Among his succes- 
sors, who were connected with the Presbytery of Antrim, 
were Mr. Futt Marshall, who was ordained in 1785, and who 
died in 1813. He was succeeded by Mr. Heron, who was 
ordained here on the 21st December, 1813. The next 
minister was Mr. John Hall, who was ordained here on the 
5th September, 1839. Meanwhile, a number of people in the 
place still adhered to Orthodoxy. In February, 1856, a 
memorial from certain inhabitants of Ballyclare and its 
vicinity, praying to be erected into a congregation, was pre- 
sented to the Presbytery of Carrickfergus ; and the General 
Assembly of the same year granted this request. On the 
5th of March, 1857, Mr. Eobert M'Cully was ordained to the 
pastoral charge. On the 2nd of May, 1865, Mr. M'Cully 
resigned, on his designation as a missionary to Australia ; 
and on the 8th March, 1866, Mr. Ebenezer M. Legate was 
ordained as minister. 

BALLYE ASTON 1st. 

This congregation at first formed a j^art of Ballyclare. 
In August, 1672, the people of Glenwherry applied for 
privileges to the Presbytery, and they were then advised to 
join themselves to some neighbouring congregation. In the 
following month they annexed themselves to Ballyclare, and 
Mr. Paton, the minister of that place, took charge of them. 



34 HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

In the interval between 1676 and 1681, Ballyeaston was 
erected into a separate congregation, and the first stated 
minister was Mr. "William Adair, son of Patrick Adair of 
Belfast. Mr. Adair was ordained here December 7th, 1681. 
In November, 1690, the Synod removed him to Antrim. The 
next minister was Stafford Pettigrew, who was ordained 
January 11th, 1699. Shortly after his ordination he was 
tried for a violation of the Seventh Commandment, but 
unanimously acquitted. He died March 28th, 1718, aged 
forty-four years. The next minister was Timothy White, 
"who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Antrim August 
8th, 1723. In 1749 he was removed to Loughbrickland. 
The next minister was William Montgomery, ordained here 
July 27th, 1758. His settlement was preceded by much 
disputing, but he was an eminently peaceful and worthy 
minister. He died April 24th, 1809, aged seventy-nine 
years, leaving a widow and family. On his demise, there 
was again much disputing with respect to a successor, and at 
length Mr. S. H. Elder, son of the Rev. James Elder, of 
Finvoy, was ordained June 22nd, 1813. Mr. Elder died 
February 21st, 1821. The next minister was William J. 
Raphael, ordained here September 25th, 1821. Mr. Raphael 
died on the 5th of August, 1865, and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Youug, who was ordained here on the 30th of 
March, 1866. On receiving a call from Manchester, Mr. 
Young resigned this charge on the 29th of May, 1877; and 
was succeeded by Mr. William John M'Cracken, who was 
installed here on the 17th of Aj)ril, 1878. 

BALLYGAWLEY. 

In 1829 this congregation was divided from Aughnacloy, 
with which it had been formerly connected as a joint charge. 
The first minister was Mr. David Cochrane, who was ordained 
by the Presbytery of Clogher on the 30th of November, 1830. 
On the 15th of May, 1837, he was suspended for intemperance. 
Soon afterwards, that is, on the 1st of August, 1837, he 
resigned all connection with the congregation and j^resbytery. 
He was succeeded by the Rev. W. Freeland, formerly minister 
of Kingstown, who was installed here on the 16th of April, 
1838. Dr. Freeland resigned the charge of this congregation 
on the 8th of July, 1841 ; and on the 18th of October, 1842, 
Mr. John Steel Dickson was ordained to the pastoral charge. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 35 

Mr. Dickson resigned tliis charge on the 1st of March, 1844, 
on his removal to Ballysillan ; and on the 24th of September, 
1844, Mr. William Ferguson was ordained to it. Mr. 
Ferguson died on the 9th of December, 1859 ; and on the 
27th of March, 1860, Mr. John M'Bride was ordained as 
minister of this congregation. Mr. M'Bride's health soon 
gave way ; and in July, 1862, the Assembly granted leave to 
his congregation to choose an assistant and successor. Mr. 
M'Bride died on the 23rd of June, 1863 ; and on the 26th of 
January, 1864, Mr. William Ross Hamilton was ordained to 
this charge. Dr. Hamilton resigned the charge of the con- 
gregation on the 18th of March, 1872, on his removal to 
Galway ; and on the 28th of May of the same year the Rev. 
David Gordon Smyth Avas installed minister here. 

BALLYGOWAN. 

This congregation was erected by the Presbytery of Belfast 
in 1837. Its first minister was Mr. John Gamble, who was 
ordained here on the 23rd of August, 1838. Mr. Gamble 
died on the 8th of January, 1854, and was succeeded by Mr. 
Thomas Shaw Woods, who was ordained here on the 28th of 
September of the same year. 

BAXLYGRAINEY. 

This congregation was erected by the Presbytery of Bangor 
in 1837. Its first minister was Mr. J. R. M'Alister, who 
was ordained hei'e on the 20th of February, 1838. He 
resigned this charge on the 20th of May, 1838, and removed 
to Armagh. He was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Blaii*, who 
was ordained here on the 29th of November of the same 
year. On the 31st of December, 1844, Mr. Blair resigned 
the charge, having accepted a call from the congregation of 
Sorbie in the Free Church of Scotland ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Samuel Megaw, who was ordained here on the 19th 
of August, 1845. On the 2nd of April, 1861, Mr. Megaw 
was degraded for immorality ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Clarke, who was ordained here on the 3rd of 
September, 1861. On the 29th of June, 1876, Mr. Clarke 
resigned this charge, having accepted a call from the congre- 
gation of Burt ; and was succeeded by Mr. S. W. Morrison, 
who was ordained here on the 28th of March, 1877. 



36 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 



BALLY JAME SDUFF. 



It is believed that Mr. Nathaniel Glasgow, wlio had been 
ordained to go to America in 1 719, was installed here by the 
Presbytery of Monaghan on the 3rd February, 1721. He 
resigned his congregation and removed to Fintona in 1732. 
The place of worship is said to have been originally at Old- 
castle, where Mr. James Hamilton was installed by the 
Presbytery of Monaghan on the 15th of May, 1733. He had 
l^reviously been minister of Killyshandra. He died here in 
August, 1756. In 1757 Lord Farnham wrote to the Synod 
on behalf of the congregation.* Some time afterwards Mr. 
William Sprot was installed here. The installation took 
place on the 16th of May, 1759. He died on the 20th of 
Aj^ril, 1789, leaving a widow and family. The next minister 
was Mr. Samuel Kennedy, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Monaghan on the 4th of March, 1790. Be- 
coming infirm, Mr. John King was ordained as his assistant 
and successor on the 3rd of May, 1826. In 1833 Mr. King 
resigned this charge, and removed to the newly-erected 
congregation of Bellasis. He was succeeded by Mr. Hutchin- 
son Perry, who was ordained here as assistant and successor 
to Mr. Kennedy on the 8th of October, 1834. On the 6th of 
November, 1836, Mr. Periy resigned this charge and removed 
to Raws, near Castlefiu. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh 
Eobert Gilchrist, who was ordained here on the 17th of May, 
1837. In June, 1837, Mr. Gilchrist resigned the charge, and 
emigrated to Austi'alia. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh 
Pollock, who was ordained here on the 6th of December, 
1837. In the month of December, 1838, he was suspended 
by the Presbytery of Cavan ; and by the Synod of Ulster in 
1839 he was disannexed from the congregation. He after- 
wards went to America. The next minister was Mr. William 
Hamilton, formerly of Killeter, who was installed here on 
the 24th of December, 1839. He resigned the charge on the 
6th of April, 1840, and removed to Edenderry. He was 
succeeded by Mr. John Ritchie, who was ordained here on 
the 30th of September, 1840, as the sixth assistant and suc- 
cessor to Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Kennedy died on the 12th of 
June, 1842. Mr. Ritchie died on the 10th of March, 1855. 

* The Farnham family have long exhibited a kindly feeling to the 
Irish Presbyterian Church. The late Lord Farnham, at the time of 
Disestablishment in 1870, was very bountifr^ to it. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 37 

He was succeeded by Mr. William Hogg, wlio was installed 
here on the 30tli of May, 1856. Mr. Hogg, having been 
appointed a missionary to New Zealand, resigned this charge 
on the 21st of July, 1863. On the 11th of the following 
December Mr. Robert H. Clarke was invested with the 
pastoral charge. Mr. Clarke died on the 20th of February, 
1883 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert H. Boyd, who was 
ordained here on the 1st of August, 1884. 



BALLYKELLY. 

The earliest minister of whom we have any notice here 
was Mr. William Crooks. He appears to have been ordained 
in this congregation about 1665. He was in Derry during 
the siege, and afterwards returned to Ballykelly, where he 
continued till his death, in 1699. The next minister was 
Mr. John Stirling, who was ordained in 1701. Mr. Stirling 
died in this charge January 21st, 1752, and was succeeded 
by Mr. John Haslett, ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Derry, April 21st, 1752. He left his congregation about the 
year 1757, and settled at Bandon, in the south of the kingdom. 
He was succeeded here by Mr. John Nelson, who was ordained 
October 5th, 1762. Mr. Nelson appears to have been at 
heart a Unitarian ; but he contrived for a time so to gloss over 
his creed that it could not be well detected, acting upon the 
principle of Erasmus, " to think with the wise and speak 
with the vulgar." But his wisdom only proved to be 
Jesuitism, and the people of Ballykelly soon found that his 
preaching was quite unprofitable. The Synod of Ulster "at 
the time was in a very lukewarm condition, and gave them 
little encouragement when they remonstrated against the 
doctrine of their minister ; so that they were obliged to take 
up the matter earnestly themselves, and they quickly made 
the place too hot for their false shepherd. Mr. Nelson was 
accordingly obliged to demit the charge in the year 1765, 
and soon afterwards published a pamphlet, in which he 
appeared in his true colours. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Benjamin M'Dowel (afterwards (D.D.), one of the most 
eminent ministers ever connected with the Presbyterian 
Church in Ireland. Mr. M'Dowel was ordained here on the 
2nd of September, 1766. In July, 1778, he was removed to 
Mary's Abbey, Dublin. The congregation was now annexed 
to the Presbytery of Route, and Mr. Robert Rentoul, 



38 HISTOKY OF CONGEEGATIOKS. 

formerly minister of Lurgan, was installed here October 3rd, 
1779. Becoming infirm, on the 22nd of December, 1822, the 
people gave a unanimous call to Mr. Richard Dill, formerly 
minister of Drumachose ; but the Presbytery of Route 
refusing to sustain it, the Synod of Ulster, in 1823, removed 
the congregation at their own request to the Presbytery of 
Derry, and Mr. Dill was installed October 9th, 1823. Mr. 
Rentoul died November 1st, 1824, leaving a widow and 
family. During Mr. Dill's ministry the present large and 
excellent church was erected at Ballykelly, at the expense 
of the Fishmongers' Company — an act commemorated in an 
inscription on an elegant marble tablet, placed in a con- 
spicuous position behind the pulpit. The erection of Bally- 
kelly Meeting-house, gave an impulse to the cause of 
ecclesiastical architecture among the Presbyterians of the 
North of Ireland. Mr. Dill died 17th Dec, 1854, and was 
succeeded by Mr. Thomas Y. Killen, formerly minister of 3rd 
Ramelton, who was installed here by a commission of the 
Assembly, March 31st, 1857. Receiving a call from Duucairn, 
Belfast, Mr. Killen (now D.D.) resigned this charge on the 
27th of January, 1862, and was succeeded by Mr. William 
Charles Robinson, formerly of Ramelton, who was installed 
here on the 27th of March, 1862. 

BALLYLENNON. 

Ballylennon is halfway between Raphoe and St. Johnston. 
The people of the district, most of whom are Presbyterians, 
had long felt the inconvenience of being so remote from a 
house of worship — being about three Irish miles distant from 
either of the places just mentioned. Nearly sixty years ago 
they began to think of obtaining more accessible church 
accommodation ; but there were adherents of the Secession 
Synod as well as of the Synod of Ulster in the locality ; 
and the rivalry of these two bodies created considerable 
difficulty. The Seceders, however, first occupied the ground ; 
and in October, 1829, Mr. John Lecky was ordained here as 
minister of the Secession Chui'ch. A house of worship was 
soon erected ; but, not long afterwards, another made its 
appearance in its immediate neighbourhood on the opposite 
side of the road, built by the adherents of the Synod of 
Ulster. On the 10th of February, 1835, Mr. George Hanson 
was ordained to the pastoral charge of the second congregation. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 39 

Messrs. Lecky aud Hanson both reached old age; and, 
in the course of nature, both required assistance in the 
performance of their pastoral functions. Meanwhile the 
Secession Synod and the Synod of Ulster were united in the 
General Assembly, and the two congregations, which had 
all along been comparatively weak, very wisely resolved on 
incorporation. At this time Mr. Lecky had a son in the 
ministry ; the people of both congregations had known him 
from his childhood ; but he was now settled at Armagh- 
bi-ague. They agi-eed, however, to give him a call to his 
native place; and on the 5th of December, 1878, Mr. 
Alexander G. Lecky was installed as pastor of the united 
congregation of Ballylennon. Mr. John Lecky died towards 
the close of 1885. 



BALLYMENA 1st. 

The first pastor who ministered to the Pi'esbyterians of 
Ballymena was the Eev. Geo. Dunbar, minister of Ayr, in 
Scotland. Banished from that kingdom for his attachment 
to the cause of Presbyterianism, he took the charge of this 
congregation about 1627, but removed to Lame a few years 
after. He was subsequently deposed by Lesly, Bishop of 
Down and Connor, in 1636, when he returned to Scotland, and 
became minister of Calder, where he died in 1638. From his 
removal till after the rebellion of 1641 no Presbyterian 
minister had liberty to officiate here. The first minister who 
was statedly ordained by a Presbytery to this charge was the 
Eev. David Buttle, ordained in 1645 ; he was imprisoned for his 
loyalty by the Republican authorities in 1650, but soon after 
released ; he was deposed by Jeremy Taylor, Bishop of Down 
and Connor, in 1661, for refusing to conform to Prelacy, but 
continued to minister privately to this people till his death 
about the year 1665. He was succeeded by the Rev. Adam 
Getty, ordained about 1666, who died in 1675. The Rev. 
Jas. Pitcairn, licensed by the Presbytery of St. Andrews, in 
Scotland, was ordained to this charge in 1676, but he returned 
to Scotland in 1687, and having accepted a parish there, he 
demitted his charge of this congregation in 1689. The 
Rev. Joshua Fisher, previously minister of Minterburu, near 
Armagh, was installed here in 1689, and was removed by the 
Synod to the congregation of Donoughmore, in Donegall, in 
1694, where he died in 1696. The Rev. Thos. Leech, ordained 



40 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

here in the month of April, 1698, died September 10th, 1738. 
The Rev. John Brown ordained as assistant and successor to 
Mr. Leech, September 21st, 1737, died June 6th, 1771. The 
Eev. John Lindsay ordained as assistant and successor to Mr. 
Brown, May 28th, 1771, died May 17th, 1795. The Rev. 
Wm. Hamilton, ordained June 21st, 1796, died January 15th, 
1811. The Rev. William Wauhope, ordained June 23rd, 1812. 
died January 20th, 1837. The Rev. Henry Jackson Dobbin 
(afterwards D.D.), previously minister of Hillsborough, 
was installed hei-e June 20th, 1837. Dr. Dobbin died on 
the 16th of April, 1863, and was succeeded by Mr. Samuel 
M. Dill (afterwards D.D.), who was installed here on the 
27tli of September, 1863. On his appointment as Professor 
of Theology in Magee College, Dr. Dill resigned this charge 
on the 9th of October 1865 ; and was succeeded by Mr. William 
Park, who was ordained here on the 25th September, 1866. 
On receiving a call from Rosemary Street Church, Belfast, 
Mr. Park resigned this charge on the 29th of July, 1873 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. S. M. Dill who was installed as 
pastor on the 7th of May, 1874. On receiving a call from 
Ayrshire Mr. Dill resigned this charge on the 19th of April, 
1881 ; and was succeeded by Mr. George Hanson, who was 
ordained hei'e on the 4th of October, 1881. 

THE HIGH KIRK, or BALLYMENA 2nd. 

This congregation originated in connection with the 
Secession Church in June, 1798. There were two congrega- 
tions ministered to by the one pastor. One of these churches 
was known as the Moor Meeting House, j)arish of Kirkinriola, 
some two miles from Ballymena ; the other was erected in 
the neighbourhood of Broughshane, in the Braid district. 
The first minister was a Mr. Carmichael. After him there 
seems to have been an interruption in the ministry. He 
was succeeded by a Mr. Wilson. In the year 1819 the Rev. 
William Campbell, A.M., a licentiate of the Donegal Presby- 
tery, was ordained pastor. He continued to preach alternately 
in the two places of worshij^ for three years, when the service 
at Broughshane was discontinued. On the 14th May, 1823, 
workmen commenced to take down the old church in the 
parish of Kirkinriola ; a new site was selected in High 
Street, Ballymena, and on this a church and manse were 
erected. The church was opened for public worship on the 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 41 

4tli April, 1824, by the Eey. William Carr, Belfast. This 
being the second Presbyterian church erected in Bally- 
mena, it was afterwards known as such. From the year 1840 
it was connected with the Ahoghill Presbytery, but the 
General Assembly in 1875 transferred it to the Ballymena 
Presbytery. It is licensed for man-iages as the High Kirk, 
Ballymena. Mr. Campbell died on the 26th of January, 1872 ; 
and on the 26th of March of the same year Mr. David 
M'Meekin, a licentiate of the Ballymena Presbytery, was 
ordained to the j^astoral charge, and the congregation has 
much improved under him. When opened for worship in 
1824 the eldership consisted of Messi's. John G-regg, George 
Dugan, Andrew Thomjison, John Eaton, ISTathaniel Grant, 
Robert Smyth, and Matthew Montgomery. With the 
exception of Robert Smyth these are all long since dead. 
The elders at present in office are Messrs. Matthew Eaton, 
William R. Thompson, John Thompson, Samuel Millar, 
William Erwin, Thomas Eaton, Quintin O'Hara, and James 
King. 

BALLYMENA WEST CHURCH. 

Little more than fifty years ago, there was only one 
Presbyterian Congregation in Ballymena. About two miles 
from the town, towards the north-west, there was, as 
already stated, a small meeting-house connected with the 
Secession Church, which stood upon a piece of naked 
moorland, but was frequented by few worshippers. As the 
town was increasing, the difficulty of obtaining accommodation 
in its only Presbyterian Church was more and more felt : and it 
occurred to the seceding minister that he would considerably 
improve his position could he remove into it what was then 
commonly known as the Moor Meeting-lunise. Having 2)ro- 
cured a site and obtained subscrij)tions from sundry of the 
town's people and others, he successfully accomplished this 
object : and thus it was that what is now the Second Presby- 
terian Church was erected in Ballymena. But the Secession 
Church was not very popular in that locality : and many who 
wanted church accommodation did not care to connect them- 
selves with the transplanted building. About 1827 a number 
of persons of this description, associated with others, signed 
a memorial addressed to the Presbytery pi'aying for the 
erection of a new congregation in connection with the Synod 
of Ulster. This petition did not meet with much encourage- 



42 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

ment from some members of tlie court to wliicli it was 
presented : and one venerable minister pleaded that, accord- 
ing to an old Synodical law, no new meeting-house could be 
built within two miles of another already in existence ! But 
the Rev. Robert Stewart, of Broughshane, who was then a 
leader in the Presbytery, and who was well aware of the want 
of another place of worship, easily removed this difficulty : and 
in due time leave was granted for the building of a new meet- 
ing-house. Though the edifice, which thus originated in 
Wellington Street, was considerably more capacious than the 
old Presbyterian Chui'ch, it was soon found to be not more 
than sufficient to meet the demands of the applicants for pews. 
On the 6th of April, 1830, the Rev. Alexander Patterson, who 
had previously been minister of Clontibret, was installed as 
the first pastor. Mr. Patterson laboured here with much 
acceptance and diligence for seventeen years : but early in 
the Summer of 1847 he fell a victim, in the prime of life, to 
fever caught in the discharge of his professional duty. He 
was succeeded by the Rev. James M'Keown, a young minister 
of much ability who was ordained here on the 14th of March, 
1848. Mr. M'Keo-wn commenced his pastoral career most 
auspiciously : but he had occupied his position somewhat less 
than two years when he too fell a victim to fever. He died 
on the 8th January, 1850. He was succeeded by the Rev. 
Samuel J. Moore, who had formerly been minister of 
Donoughmore, and who was installed here on the 24th 
September, 1850. A few years ago the congregation re- 
solved on the erection of a new Church ; many contributed 
most liberally to the object ; and in due time what is now 
known as the West Church was opened for worship. Mr. 
Moore died on the 8th of April, 1876 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Edward F. Simpson, formerly minister of Lislooney, 
who was installed here on the 3rd of October, 1876. 

BALLYMENA, WELLINGTON STREET. 

A NUMBER of the people hitherto connected with the 3rd 
congi'egation declined to remove to West Church ; and 
those who thus adhei'ed to the former building in 
Wellington Street were recognised by the Assembly as 
a congregation. On the 31st of March, 1863, the Rev. 
William Macloy was ordained as their minister. Thus 
Bally mena which in 1820 had only one Presbyterian Church, 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 43: 

has now no less tlian four, three of which are each much 
more capacious than the solitary edifice then in existence. 
Mr. M'Cloy resigned this charge on the 9th of August,, 
1881, on his acceptance of a call from a Free Church in 
Paisley ; and was succeeded by Mr. William John M'Caughau, 
who was ordained here on the 1st of January, 1884. Mr. 
M'Caughan, on receiving a call to Mount Pottinger Church, 
Belfast, resigned this charge about the close of 1885. 

BALLYMOATE. 

This congregation appears to have been erected in 1759. 
It then consisted of fifteen families. It became a part of 
Sligo congregation about 1760. In 1822 the people applied 
to the Synod of Ulster to be erected into a separate charge ; 
but the consideration of the subject was defen-ed in con- 
sequence of the non-attendance of Commissioners, and the 
absence of Mr. Scott the minister of Sligo and Ballymoate. 
The application was granted in the following year. Mr. 
Jacob Scott then resigned the charge of Sligo, and was ap- 
pointed to labour exclusively in Ballymoate. In 1828 Mr. 
Scott was deposed from the ministry. The congregation was 
then put under the care of a committee of Synod, and Mr. 
James Fleming was ordained here on the 22nd of Januarv, 
1829. Mr. Fleming died on the 8th of May, 1850, and on 
the 9th of October of the same year, Mr. John Dewart was 
ordained to the pastoral charge and also as missionary to the 
surrounding district. At the Assembly of 1885, Mr. Dewart 
obtained leave for his congregation to choose an assistant 
and successor. 

BALLYMONEY 1st. 

The first minister here was Mr. Ker. His settlement was 
opposed by Mr. Stewart, of Ballintoy, who had some interest 
here. Mr. Ker was supjDorted by the majority of the people; 
but Mr. Stewart appealed to the Parliamentary Commissioners, 
and they referred the case to the Presbytery. He was ulti- 
mately settled about the end of the year 1646. In April, 
1649, Mr. Ker refused to join in the Pi-esbytery's protest 
against the murder of Charles I., and took part with the 
Republicans and Independents. He was in consequence 
suspended by the Presbytery for some time; but upon owning 



44 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

his errors, lie was afterwards restored. At tlie Restoration 
in 1660, he was deposed by Jeremy Taylor, bishop of Down 
and Connor. He now passed over to Scotland where he died 
not long after. Ballymoney was without a minister in 1671. 
It was supplied for a time by David Houston ; but he was 
suspended by the Presbytery in 1672 for irregular and insu- 
bordinate conduct.* This suspension caused a great division 
in the congregation, part adhering to Houston, and part to 
the Presbytery. We hear nothing farther of Ballymoney 
for some time. It was again vacant in 1688. In April, 
1692, the people applied to the Synod of Ulster for advice 
about a minister, David Boyd and Robert Love being their 
commissioners. In 1693, the Synod transferred Mr. Hugh 
Kirkpatrick from Lurgan to this congregation ; but he being 
iu Scotland, whei'e he had fled at the Revolution, did not 
come over to his new charge till 1695. Mr. Kirkpatrick was 
Moderator of Synod in 1699. He was father to the Rev. Dr. 
James Kirkpatrick, aftei'wards of Belfast, the author of 
" Presbyterian Loyaltv." Mr. Hugh Kirkpatrick died in 
April, 1712. In 1714,"'the Sub-Synod of Derry divided this 
cougregation, deeming it too large for one minister, taking 
from it 20 quarter-lands, of which 14 were annexed to 
Kilraughts, and 6 to Derrykihan, or Dervock. Of this 
dismemberment the people complained to the Synod in 1715, 
and stated their willingness rather to support two ministers 
than have their congregation divided. It was accordingly 
declared a collegiate charge, and appointed to pay d835 and 10 
bolls of oats yearly to each minister, and to provide convenient 
farms : but, on failing to give security for this, the order of 
the Derry Sub-Synod was to take effect. On reconsidering 
the matter, the jjeople gave up the idea of becoming a 
collegiate charge, and consequently lost the 20 quarter- 
lands. They then obtained as minister Mr. Robert 
M'Bride, son of the Rev. Mr. M'Bride, of Belfast, the 
author of "A Sample of Jet Black Prelatic Calumny." 
Mr. M'Bride was ordained here on the 26th September, 
1716. He died September 2nd, 1759, aged 73. In 
1753, having become infirm, Messrs. John Thompson and 
Grabriel Todd, as commissioners from the congregation, 
supplicated the Synod to grant them supplies with a view to 
obtaining an assistant to Mr. M'Bride. They now obtained 

* Mr. Houston held the principles of the Cameronians ; and was a 
somewhat turbulent and unsteady character. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 45 

as assistant Mx*. Robert Smylie, who was ordaiued here in 
1759, and died in this charge on the 31st of August, 1768, 
aged 35. The next minister was Mr. Alexander Marshall, 
who was ordained here by the Px-esbyterv of Route, on the 
18th of August, 1772. He died on the lOth of April, 1799, 
aged 50. In 1800 the congregation was annexed to the 
Px'esbytery of Ballymena, with which it i-emained long 
connected. The next minister was Mr. Benjamin Mitchell, 
who was ordained hex*e by the Presbytei'y of Ballymena, on 
the 12th of Novexnber, 1800. Mr. Mitchell resigned the charge 
on the 9th of May, 1815, and died in the month of August 
following. He was succeeded by Mr. Robert Park, who was 
ox-dained hex-e on the 18th of March, 1817. Becoxning ixifirm, 
Mr. Park obtained as his assistant Mr. Alexander Patton, 
who was ordained hex*e on the 5th of Novexnber, 1866. Mx*. 
Park died on the 10th of May, 1876, after a ministx-y of 59 
years, during 35 of which he had acted as clerk to the 
Genex'al Assembly. Mr. Patton, on receiving a call from the 
congregation of 1st Bangor, x'esigned this charge in 1879, 
and was succeeded by Mr. Nathaniel Ross, who was ox-dained 
hex-e on the 25th of November of the same year. Mr. Ross 
x-esigned the chax-ge on the 24th of Apx-il, 1882, and was 
succeeded by Mr. J. D. Osborne, Avho was ordained here on 
the 8th of Novexnber, 1882.* 



BALLYNAHINCH 1st. 

The first minister noticed in this parish was Mr. William 
Reid, ordained hex-e by the Presbytery of Down, July 14th, 
1696. His successor was Mx-. Henry Livingston, son of Mx-. 
Henx-y Livingston, minister of Dx-uxnbo.f He was ordained 
hex-e Apx-il 16th, 1704, as assistant and successor to Mr. Reid, 
who died May 7th, 1708. The next minister was Mr. James 
M' Alpine, fox-mex-ly of Killyleagh Castle, who was installed 
hex-e March 20th, 1714. He died in this charge October 27th, 
1732. His successor was Mr. Alexander Maclaine, son of 
Mr. Archibald Maclaine, of Markethill, and uncle to the 

* There are now three congregations connected with the General 
Assembly in BallymoDey. 

t Mr. Livingston was descended from the fir^t Lord Livingston of 
Scotland ; and from him the late John Barnett, D.D., of Moneymore, 
was lineally descended. 



46 HISTOKY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

celebrated Dr. Archibald Maclaine, the translator of Mosheini's 
Ecclesiastical History. Mr. Maclaine was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Killyleagh, August 18th, 1735. A consider- 
able party, amounting to about 120, were dissatisfied with this 
election, and applied by their Commissioners, Mr. Alexander 
Holmes and others, to be ex-ected into a separate congrega- 
tion ; but this was refused by the Synod in 1736. Mr. 
Maclaine removed to Antrim in 1742. The next minister 
was Mr. John Strong, who was ordained by the Presbytery of 
Killyleagh, October 10th, 1744. Mr. Strong died August 
10th, 1780, and was succeeded by Mr. John M'Clelland, 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Dromore, October 21st, 
1783. Becoming infirm, his son, Mr. James M'Clelland, was 
ordained his assistant and successor August 25th, 1812. 
Mr. M'Clelland, senior, died March 5th, 1818, and his son 
resigned through ill health in 1829. In consequence of 
disputes respecting the choice of a minister, the congregation 
■was put under the care of a committee of Synod in 1831 ; 
and by this committee Mr. John Shaw, formerly minister of 
Ballinderry, was installed here August 10th, 1831. Mr. 
Shaw died on the 29th of March, 1870, and was succeeded by 
Mr. John M'llveen, who was ordained here on the 27th of 
December of the same year. Mr. M'llveen, on his removal 
to 1st Lurgan, resigned this charge on the 25th of February, 
1879 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John Boyd, who was 
ordained here on the 3rd of February, 1880. 



BALLTNURE. 

There was a congregation at Raloo in the neighbourhood 
of Ballynure, long before there was a congregation in Bally- 
nure itself. The Presbytery in 1659 jjermitted the people of 
Ealoo to choose a minister ; but the Restoration which 
immediately followed, defeated this design for a time. At 
length in November, 1671, the year before the first grant of 
JRegium Bonum was made, the Presbytery was again applied 
to. The people now requested that Mr. Robert Kelso should 
be settled among them as their pastor, and that the people 
of Glynn should be added to their congregation. This latter 
point being refused by the Presbytery, the people agreed to 
support a minister themselves, and Mr. Kelso was ordained 
at Larne, on the 7th of May, 1673. Mr. Jo. Anderson of 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 47 

Glenarni preacliecl and presided on this occasion. The 
oi-diuation was private, as at that time the ministers subjected 
themselves to heavy penalties by performing it. This also 
■was the reason why it took place not at Raloo, but at Larne. 
lu the June following, John Blair and Alexander Dunlop, 
elders, attended the Presbytery and in the name of the con- 
gregation publicly accepted Mr. Kelso as their minister. In 
April, 1674, however, after varioiis ineffectual attempts to 
secure a sufficient maintenance for Mr. Kelso, the congrega- 
tion acknowledged themselves unable to support a minister ; 
and the Presbytery at his desire accordingly loosed Mr. 
Kelso from his charge. He was subsequently settled, first 
at Wicklow, and then at Enniskillen. No farther attempts 
Avere made for upwards of a century and a half to establish 
a congregation at Ealoo. But in 1722 Mr. Andrew Lorimer 
and other commissioners presented a petition to the Synod of 
Ulster praying to have Ballynure erected into a separate 
congregation. The apjjlication was oj^posed on the j^art of 
Ballyclare ; but was, notwithstanding, granted. Mr. JSTevin 
and Mr. Michael Bruce protested against this decision. The 
final settlement of the separation was referred to the next 
Synod. The people then offered <£oO yearly stipend to a 
minister, and stated that they had scruples to live under the 
uon-subscribing minister at Ballyclare as one reason why 
they wished a separation. In 1747, David Archibald the 
commissioner from this congregation, represented to the 
Synod that as Mr. Clotworthy Brown had been transferred 
from Ballinderry to them, they think he may be continued 
their minister without being formally installed. The reason 
of this seems to have been that Mr. Brown had some scruples 
about subscribing the Westminster Confession of Paith. 
Another part of the congregation, by their commissioner, 
James Scott, represented it as the desire of a great number 
there, that Mr. Brown should be installed. The Synod 
decided that the Presbytery of Temjilepatrick should install 
Mr. Brown as soon as convenient, but in the following year 
the Presbytery reported that they had not installed Mr. 
Brown, he having joined the nou subscribing Presbytery of 
Antrim, and having been installed by them. Mr. Bi'own was 
afterwards removed to Belfast as a minister of the first con- 
gregation where he died on the 19th of May, 1755. The 
next minister of Ballynure was Mr. William Eodgers, who 
had before been minister of the second congregation of 



48 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

Holywood. Mr. Rodgers was installed here by tlie Presbytery 
of Templepatrick, December 10th, 1751. Mr. Rogers grow- 
ing infirm, Mr. Adam Hill who had been ordained by the 
Presbytery of Route for America, was installed here on the 
16th of August, 1785. Mr. Rogers died April 29th, 1786. 
Mr. Hill becoming infirm, Mr. James Whiteside M'Gay was 
ordained his assistant on the 21st of December, 1826. Mr. 
Hill died on the 21st of July, 1827, leaving a family ; Mr. 
M'Cay died on the 15th of October, 1847 ; and on the 28th 
of March, 1848, Mr. Samuel Alexander Hamilton was ordained 
to this charge. Mr. Hamilton resigned the charge on the 1st 
of July, 1859 ; and emigrated to Australia. On the 26th of 
September of the same year, Mr. A. R. B. M'Cay, son of the 
foi-mer minister, was ordained to the charge. Mr. M'Cay 
resigned on the 2nd of May, 1865, and also emigrated to 
Australia ;* and on the 31st of March, 1866, Mr. William 
Kerr was ordained to the pastoral charge. 



BALLYRASHANE 1st. 

A minister appears to have been settled here nearly a year 
before the death of Oliver Cromwell. We read of the 
ordination of Mr. Robert Hogsyard, or Hodgeheard, at Bally- 
rashane, in October, 1657. He was deposed for non- 
conformity in 1661, but nothing is known of his after history. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Harvey, who was licensed by 
the Presbytery of Antrim, and ordained to the charge of this 
congregation by the Presbytery of Route, towards the end of 
the year 1673. He retired to Scotland at the Revolution ; 
but, in May, 1690, he signified his willingness to return to 
his flock, and probably did so. We find Mr. Thomas Elder 
ordained on the 5th of October, 1700. Mr. Elder demitted 
his charge in 1704, and removed to Scotland. He would 
appear to have afterwards settled at Kilmore, County Down. 
The next minister was Mr. Henry Neill, who was ordained 
here on the 25th of July, 1709. He died in this charge on 
the 10th of March, 1745. He was succeeded by Mr. Samuel 
Buys, who was ordained here on the 28th of October, 1746. 

* Mr. M'Cay is now minister of Castlemaine, in Victoria. He acted 
for a number of years as Professor of Church History for the Australian 
Church ; and has meanwhile distinguished himself as one of the ablest 
divines in the country. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 49 

He died in September, 1760, and was succeeded by Mr. John 
Logan, who was ordained here on the 24th of November, 
1765. Becoming infirm, Mr. James Dunlop was ordained his 
assistant and successor in December, 1809. Mr. Logan died 
on the 10th of May, 1816, leaving a widow and family. Mr. 
Dunlop died on the 16th of November, 1830. He was 
succeeded by Mr. John Alexander, who was ordained here on 
the 20th of June, 1832. Mr. Alexander was the nephew of 
the Rev. James Elder, of Finvoy. Mr. Alexander died on 
the 16th of March, 1881, He had previously obtained leave 
for his congi'egation to choose an assistant and successor ; 
and accordingly on the 28th of September, 1880, Mr. Charles 
W. Hunter had been ordained here. 



BALLYEONEY. 

This congregation was first organised in 1708. It had 
formerly been a section of Rathfriland congregation. The 
first minister was Mr. James Moor, who was ordained here 
on the 25th of August, 1709. Mr. Moor died in this charge 
on the 22nd of March, 1738. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Eobert Thompson, who was ordained here by the Presbytery 
of Armagh on the 14th of May, 1782, as assistant to Mr. 
Moor. Mr. Thompson died on the 4th of September, 1743. 
The next minister was Mr. Samuel Thompson, who was 
ordained here on the 14th of March, 1749, Having become 
feeble in intellect, he resigned the charge. The next minister 
was Mr. Alexander Wilson, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Dromore on the 20th of August, 1751. He 
died here on the 8th of May, 1782, leaving a widow and 
children. He was succeeded by Mr. William Fletcher, who 
was ordained here on the 3rd of June, 1783. He died in this 
charge on the 7th of May, 1824, leaving a widow and family. 
The next minister was Mr. Alexander Heron, formerly 
minister of Portadown, who was installed here on the 15th of 
August, 1826, Mr. Heron died on the 17th of November, 
1865, He was succeeded by the Rev. William Wylie, who 
was ordained here on the 4th of May, 1866. On the 11th of 
September, 1879, Mr, Wylie resigned this charge, on his re- 
moval to 2nd Larne ; and was succeeded by Mr, William 
Shepherd, who was installed here on the 29th of April, 1880, 



50 HISTOET OF CONGREGATIONS. 

BALLTSHANNON. 

A congregation seems to have existed at an early period at 
Ballyshannon : but it was long associated with Raneny or 
Donegal, the minister preaching two Sabbaths in Raneny and 
one in Ballyshannon. This state of things continued until 
1834, when Ballyshannon was erected into a separate congre- 
gation. The first minister was Mr. J. G. Muri^hj (now Dr. 
Murphy, of Assembly's College, Belfast), who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Raphoe on the 26th of October, 
1836. In 1841 Mr. Murphy removed to Belfast, having been 
appointed Head Master of the Classical Department in the 
Royal Academical Institution. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Andrew Lowry, who was ordained here on the 16th of 
March, 1842. 

BALLY WALTER 1st. 

The first minister of Ballywalter was Mr. James.Hamilton,* 
nephew to Lord Claneboye, who was ordained here in 1626. 
He was deposed by Leslie, Bishop of Down and Connor, in 
1636, on which he removed to Scotland, and became minister, 
first at Dumfries, and latterly at Edinburgh, where he was 
again deposed in 1660, and died shortly after. Ballywalter 
continued vacant from 1636 to 1642, when Mr. James Baty, 
who had been chaplain to the Lord of Aird's regiment, was 
ordained to this charge by the Presbytery of the Scots army, 
Mr. Hamilton, their former minister, now sent over by the 
General Assembly, presiding on the occasion. Mr. Baty was 
imprisoned by Venables in June, 1650, and, shortly after, 
either died or fled to Scotland. He was succeeded by Mr. 
William Reid, who was deposed, in 1661, by the Bishop of 
Down. In 1688, Mr. John Goudy was ordained here. The 
charge then included Ballyhalbert and Greyabbey ; and in 
1710, the Presbytery of Down ordered a central meeting- 
house, for both places, to be built at Ballygin. The Synod 
confirmed this sentence, but gave the Presbytery liberty, on 
sufiicient grounds, to erect a new congregation out of Bally- 
walter, Ballyhalbert, and Greyabbey. Mr. Goudy died in this 
charge, March 20th, 1733, aged 78 years. He was succeeded 

* It may interest some of our readers to know that Mr. Hamilton, 
wlio was one of the most distinguished of the Fathers of the Irish 
Presbyterian Church, wore a gown in the pulpit. — Rttd's Hist. I. 104, 



HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 51 

by liis son, Mr. Eobert Goiidj, ordained here, April 9tli, 
.1 734. Mr. Goudy joined the Presbytery of Antrim, and died, 
March loth, 1761. At his death, the congregation returned 
to the care of the Bangor Presbytery, which ordained Mr. 
James Cochrane here, July 27th, 1762. He died in this 
charge, September 22nd, 1802, and was succeeded by Mr. 
Andrew Goudy, ordained on the 3rd Tuesday of December 
following. He died here December 8th, 1818, leaving a 
widow and family. In the end of the year 1819, the congre- 
gation called Mr. John Gibson ; but, certain charges being 
preferred against him, his ordination was deferred ; and, in 
1820, the Synod of Ulster withdrew his license. This led to 
a schism in the parish, as the bulk of the people adhered to 
Mr. Gibson, who was ordained irregularly, and continued to 
preach here till his death, in May, 1861. In 1844, Mr. Gibson 
applied for admission to the General Assembly; and, as 
circumstances had arisen tending to invalidate the testimony 
on which he was condemned, he was, in that year, regularly 
ordained in Ballywalter, by a Commission appointed for the 
purpose. Mr. Gibson becoming infirm, Mr. Henry Gamble 
became his assistant. Mr. Gibson died on the 13th of May, 
1861, and Mr. Gamble was ordained, shortly afterwards, his 
successor. On the withdrawal of Mr. Gibson from the 
Synod of Ulster, in 1820, a portion of the people left him ; 
and, over this minority, Mr. John Templeton was ordained 
pastor in March, 1821. Mr. Templeton died in August, 1856, 
and was succeeded by Mr. David Hill M'Murtry, who was 
ordained here, on the 31st of March, 1857. Mr". M'Murtry 
resigned the congregation on the 1st of April, 1859 ; and on 
the 16th of August of the same year, Mr. Samuel Edgar 
Brown was ordained to the pastoral charge. In 1861, Mr. 
Brown removed to Athlone, and was succeeded by Mr. David 
Magill, LL.D., who was installed here on the 19th of 
February, 1862. Dr. Magill has recently retired from the 
discharge of the active duties of the ministiy. 

BALLTWALTEE 2nd. 

The histoiy of this congregation is, to a great extent given 
in the preceding article. Mr, Gamble * resigned this charge on 

* Mr. Gamble died in the prime of life. His widow has since been 
distinguished as the munificent benefactress of the Assembly's College, 
Belfast, in which he was educated. 



52 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

the 6tli of September, 1865 ; and was succeeded, by Mr. David 
M'Kee, who was installed here on the 6th of March, 1866. 
Mr. M'Kee resigned the charge on the 5th of January, 1869, 
having received a call from Dublin, and was succeeded by 
Mr. John Eogers who was ordained here on the 3rd of Jime, 
1869. 



BALLTWILLAN. 

Tradition reports that Gabriel Cornwall was one of the 
first ministers of this congregation. He preached in the 
parish church, and was ejected at the Restoration. He is 
mentioned by Livingstone as having been here in 1656. We 
read subsequently of the ordination of Mr. William Houston 
here in 1700. He died in this charge on the 6th of May, 
1721. Meanwhile Mr. James Thompson was ordained here 
on the 5th of May, 1718, as assistant and successor. Mr. 
Thompson died on the 25th of January, 1747. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Hugh Gaston, who was ordained here on 
the 23rd of February, 1748. Mr. Gaston died here on the 
15th of October, 1766. He is well-known as the author of a 
work first published in 1763, under the title of "A Scripture 
Account of the Faith and Practice of Christians, consisting 
of large collections of jjertinent texts of Scripture upon the 
sundry articles of Revealed Religion." This vei'y useful work 
has passed through various editions, and is commended by 
Hartwell Home in his "Introduction to the Critical Study 
and knowledge of the Holy Scriptures." Mr. Gaston left a 
widow who died in 1823, having enjoyed the Widows' Fund 
of the Synod of Ulster no less than 57 years. He was 
succeeded as minister of Ballywillan, by Mr. John Abernethy, 
who was ordained here on the 15th of August, 1769. Mr. 
Abernethy removed to Templepatrick in August, 1774, and 
was succeeded in Ballywillan by Mr. Robert Thompson who 
was ordained here on the 23rd of April, 1779. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. James Huey was ordained here as his assistant 
and successor on the 1st of December, 1812. Mr. Thompson 
died on the 10th of July, 1815. Mr. Huey died on the 20th 
of Januai*y, 1862* ; and on the 24th of June of the same year 
Mr. Matthew Woodburn was ordained to the pastoral charge. 

* John Henry Huey, Esq., J. P., of Clonaven, Coleraine, is the son 
of this minister. 



HISTOKY OF CONGREGATIONS. 53 

Mr. Woodburn died on the 28tli of November, 1877 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Hugh Wells who was ordained here on the 
6th of August, 1879. 



BALTEAGH. 

In 1822 the inhabitants of this district applied to the 
Synod of Ulster to be erected into a congregation. They 
were permitted to build a meeting-house, and for some time 
the neighbouring ministers were appointed to supply them 
with preaching. In the following year they were erected 
into a congregation, and on the 16th November, 1824, Mr. 
Samuel Templeton was ordained as their first minister. They 
are at present connected with the Presbytery of Limavady. 
Mr. Templeton died on the 11th of September, 1866. He 
was succeeded by Mr. William D. Wallace, who was ordained 
to the pastoral charge on the 26th of April, 1868. Mr. 
Wallace resigned this charge on the 15th of January, 1872, 
and removed to 1st Eamelton. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Eichard Dill Macky, who was ordained here on the 22nd of 
November, 1872. Mr. Macky resigned this charge on the 
17th of November, 1883, on his removal to New South Wales. 
He has since returned, and resumed the charge of the 
congregation. 

BANAGHER. 

This congregation originally formed part of that of Cumber. 
It became a distinct charge about the year 1755, and its first 
minister was Mr. Jo. Law, who was ordained here on the 5th 
of July, 1756. He died in this charge in January, 1810, 
leaving a widow. The next minister, who was ordained in 
1812, was Mr. James A. Johnston, known among his friends 
as "the lovely divine." He was a very handsome man, but 
not a deep theologian. He resigned the charge in May, 
1831, and removed to Holywood, where he became minister 
of the congregation connected with the Presbytery of Antrim. 
He was succeeded in Banagher by Mr. Thomas Ellison, who 
was ordained here on the 5th of March, 1822. On the 
formation of the G-eneral Assembly, Banagher became con- 
nected with the Presbytery of G-lendermot. Mr. Ellison died 
on the 6th of Januai-y, 1847, and was succeeded by Mr. R. L. 
Rogers, who was installed here on the 25th of November, 



54 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

1847. Mr. Eogers died on the 15tli of October, 1879, and 
was succeeded by Mr. W. J. D. Williamson, who was installed 
here on the 3rd of September, 1880. 



BANBEIDGE 1st. 

Banbridge was originally part of Magherally congregation, 
which was proposed to be divided in the year 1716. One 
part called 8ea/patrich was erected into a separate charge ; 
and in the same year a meeting-house was build at Banbridge. 
This caused great divisions in Seapatrick and Magherally, all 
which were referred to the Synod in 1717, when it was 
determined that Mr. Young, the minister of Magherally, 
should preach alternately in the two congregations. This 
arrangement did not continue long. The people of Banbridge 
at length obtained a minister of their own, viz., Mr. Archibald 
Maclaine, son of Mr. Maclaine, of Markethill, who was 
ordained here, April 26th, 1720. He died in this charge, 
February 23rd, 1740. He was succeeded by Mr. Henry 
Jackson, who is said to have been nearly related to General 
Jackson, President of the United States, Mr. Jackson was 
ordained at Banbridge by the Presbytery of Armagh on the 
8th of November, 1743. In 1772, it was reported to Synod 
that bequests to the amount of =£130 had been made to the 
congregation of Banbridge, and that the interest was regularly 
paid to the minister. Mr. Jackson was grandfather to the 
late Rev. H. J. Dobbin, D.D., of Ballymena. On the 6th of 
January, 1790, Mr. Jackson i-esigned the charge of the con- 
gregation of Banbridge; and, on the same day, Mr. Nathaniel 
Shaw was ordained as his assistant and successor. Mr. 
Jackson died, February 26th, 1795, leaving a widow and 
family; and Mr. Shaw died, July 4th, 1812. The next 
minister was Mr. James Davis, who was ordained here March 
23rd, 1814. Mr. Davis adhered to the New-Light party in 
the Arian controversy ; and, in 1829, those who withdrew 
from his ministry were erected into a congregation by the 
Presbytery of Dromore ; and, on the 22nd of June, 1830, Mr. 
Robert Anderson was ordained as their minister. Mr. 
Anderson died on the 29th of February, 1872, and was 
succeeded by Mr. John Sinclair Hamilton, who was installed 
here on the 3rd of July, 1872. Mr. Hamilton resigned this 
charge on the 14th of February, 1884, on his removal to 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 55 

Dublin ; and was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Boyd, formerly 
of Magheramason, who was installed hei'e on the 7th of 
August of the same year. 



BANGOR 1st. 

In 1623, Mr. Robert Blair, who had been invited from 
Scotland by Lord Claneboy, came over to Bangor and was 
ordained to the ministry by Echlin, Bishop of Down, and 
some of the neighbouring pastors. He remained here till he 
was deposed in 1636, when he retired to Scotland and became 
minister successively of Ayr and St. Andrews.* After the 
rebellion of 1641, this congregation attracts particular notice, 
and we find a session ordained in it in 1642. It did not, 
however, obtain a minister until 1646, when Mr. Gilbert 
Ramsay came over from Scotland, recommended by Mr. Blair, 
and was ordained here. Mr. Ramsay suffered several im- 
prisonments ; was deposed in 1661 ; after the Restoration, his 
meeting-house was pulled down by Lady Clanbrasil in 1669 ; 
and he at length died, in August, 1670. Another minister 
from Scotland, Mr. Archibald Hamilton, who had been six 
years pastor of Wigton, was settled in Bangor in 1672. He 
retired to Scotland at the troubles in 1689, and died at Wigton 
in June, 1695. He was succeeded at Bangor by his grandson, 
Mr. Hamilton, whose ministry was only of one year's con- 
tinuance. After, as it would appear, a long vacancy, Mr. 
William Biggar, a minister from Scotland, was installed here, 
March 1st, l"704. In March, 1728, Mr. Biggar resigned the 
charge, and removed to Scotland, where he became minister 
of a parish in Galloway. In 1 730, the congregation was still 
vacant, and Robert Blackwood, Esq.,t appeared at the 
Synod, as its commissioner, seeking for supplies. In 1731 a 
call was given to Mr. Cochrane, minister of Kilraughts, but 
the Synod refused to sanction the removal. The next minister 
was Mr. James Mackay, who was ordained here November 
15th, 1732. In 1747 the congregation was again vacant; 
and in 1748 the Synod agreed to permit the removal of Mr. 
Cochrane, of Kilraughts, to whom the people of Bangor had 

* Mr. Blair was one of the most able and distinguished of the 
Fathers of the Ii-ish Presbyterian Church. He was a gentleman by 
birth ; and he acted for some time as chaplain to Charles I. 

t This gentleman was the ancestor of Lord Dufferin. 



66 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

renewed their call. Mr. Coclirane, who at this time was 
Clerk of the Synod, was accordingly installed here, December 
6th, 1748. The congregation promised him ^60 and twenty 
bolls of oats yearly. In 1758 Mr. Cochrane resigned his 
office as Clerk of the Synod ; and, in consequence of his in- 
creasing infirmities, the congregation applied to the Synod, 
in 1760, for supplies. On this occasion Mr. Hugh Jackson 
appears as their commissioner. Their next minister was Mr. 
James Hull, formerly minister of Cookstown,whowas installed 
here January 4th, 1763. Mr. Cochrane, now the senior 
minister, died June 2nd, 1765, leaving a widow and family. 
Mr. Hull becoming infirm, Mr. David Taggart was ordained 
his assistant. May 21st, 1793. Mr. Hull died March 30th, 
1794, and Mr. Taggart was drowned at Bangor quay, March, 
16th, 1808. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Woods, ordained 
November 15th, 1808. During his ministry, Second Bangor, 
Groomsport, Ballygilbert, Ballygrainey, and Conlig were 
erected within the bounds of his charge. In 1856 Mr. Woods 
retired from the discharge of the active duties of the ministry ; 
and on the 24th of February, 1857, Mr. Joseph C. M'Cullagh 
was installed as his assistant and successor. Mr. Woods died 
on the 4th of April, 1869. Mr. M'Cullagh died on the 1st 
of December, 1878 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Alexander 
Patton, formerly of 1st Ballymoney, who was installed here 
on the 17th of June, 1879. 



BANGOE 2nd. 

This congregation was erected by a Committee of the 
Synod of Ulster, sjiecially appointed in 1828. The meeting- 
house was erected some time afterwards. On the 5th of 
August, 1829, Mr, William Patteson was ordained to the 
ministry here by a committee of Synod. Mr. Patteson 
obtained leave for his congregation to choose an asssistant 
and successor in June, 1879 ; and on the 31st of July, of the 
same year, Mr. William Clarke was installed here. A new 
church, on a different site, is about to be erected for this 
conwresation. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 57 

BELFAST CONGREGATIONS. 



BALLYMACARRETT 1st. 

In the early part of tlie present century there was no place 
of worship whatever in Ballymacarrett. The population was 
comparatively small, and generally in very humble circum- 
stances . About sixty years ago attention was drawn to its 
spiritual destitution, and various denominations commenced 
preaching in it. The Methodists erected a small chapel ; the 
Episcopalians also erected a place of worshijD ; and the 
Presbyterians likewise took steps to supply ordinances to 
those connected with their communion. The congregation 
of 1st Ballymacarrett was erected in 1835. The first minister 
was Mr. John Meneely, who was ordained here on the 20th 
of March, 1838. Mr. (now Dr.) Meneely long laboured here 
with much acceptance, and during his ministry the church was 
greatly enlarged and improved. Becoming infirm, Mr. William 
M'Kean, formerly minister of 2nd Raphoe, was installed as 
Dr. Meneely's assistant and successor on the 8th of December, 
1881.* 

DONEGALL STREET. 

In 1773 Mr. James Bryson, who had formerly been minister 
of Lisburn, was called to the charge of what was then known 
as the 2nd congregation of Belfast (now Unitarian). Some 
disagreement at length arose between Mr. Bryson and a 
number of his people; and in 1792 a new place of worship was 
erected in Donegall Street by the party adhering to him, of 
which he was recognized as the minister. Mr. Bryson died 
October 3rd, 1796, leaving a widow and family, and was 
succeeded by Mr. Robert Acheson, formerly minister of 
Glenarm, who was installed here June 20th, 1799. He died 
in this charge February 21st, 1824, leaving a widow and 
family. The next minister was Mr. George Bellis (afterwai'ds 
D.D.), who was ordained here May 24th, 1825. In 1841 
Mr. Bellis, on his appointment as missionary secretary for 
the General Assembly, resigned the charge of the congrega- 
tion, and was succeeded by Mr. Isaac Nelson, formerly 

* There are now three Presbyterian congregations in Ballymacarrett ; 
and the erection of a fourth is contemplated. 



58 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

minister of 1st Comber, who was installed here by the 
Presbytery of Belfast, on the 31st of March, 1842. Mr. 
Nelson having obtained leave to retire from the active 
duties of the Ministry, Mr. George Magill, formerly of 2nd 
Donagheady, was installed here on the 9th of December, 
1880. The old church has since been taken down, and a new 
building on a different site is in course of erection. 

FISHEEWICK PLACE. 

This congregation was erected at a pro-re-nata meeting of 
the Synod of Ulster specially convened in Moneymore, on the 
31st of December, 1823. It may now seem strange that the 
erection of this congregation was keenly opposed on the 
ground that there was already a sufficient amount of church 
accommodation in Belfast. There were then only thi*ee or 
four orthodox Presbyterian Churches in the town, and one 
or two of these were very poorly attended. The commissioners 
for the new erection who attended the Synod were Dr. 
James Thompson, Professor of Mathematics in the Belfast 
Academical Institution, and father of the j^resent celebrated 
Sir William Thompson ; Alexander Mackey, Proprietor of 
the Belfast Netvs-Letter ; and Charles Thomson, uncle to Sir 
Thomas M'Clure, Bart. These gentlemen presented to the 
Synod a list of 162 intended seat-holders who engaged to pay 
an annual stipend of .£213 15s 6d. The congregation was 
then put under the care of a Committee of Synod. Several 
years passed away before the house was ready for worship. 
There were at that time only a very few houses near the 
j)lace on which it stands, as the town had not then commenced 
to move out in the direction of the Botanic Gardens. The 
ground on which the Church now stands was little better than 
a swamp ; and after the foundations were laid they remained 
long without any superstructure. The house was at length 
opened for worship on the 23rd of September, 1827, by Dr. 
Chalmers. The preacher chose for his text on the occasion, 
James, i. 20, " The wrath of man worketh not the righteous- 
ness of God ;" and, as the Arian controversy was then raging, 
many thought that the discourse was intended to moderate 
the strife of the disputants. After some disputing respect- 
ing the qualifications of those who should be permitted to 
vote for the first minister, the matter was finally arranged by 
the Synod in 1828. In the month of August of that year, a 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 59 

unanimous call -was presented to the Rev. James Moro-an 
(afterwards D.D.), then minister of Lisburn. Mr. Morgan 
accepted the call, and was installed here on the 4th of 
November, 1828. His ministry was a signal blessing, not 
only to the town of Belfast, but also to the whole Presbyterian 
Church of Ireland. He did much to create and foster a 
Missionary spirit ; and under him the congregation of Fisher- 
wick Place became a model to all the other churches of the 
Assembly. For many years Dr. Morgan was the Secretary 
of the Foi'eign Mission, of which he may be considered the 
father. He was by nature of an extremely delicate constitu- 
tion, and yet he survived to old age. He was remarkably 
temperate in his mode of living, and systematic in all his 
proceedings. He died on the 5th of August, 1873 ; but 
meanwhile, in consequence of his increasing infirmities, his 
congregation had obtained leave to select an assistant and 
successor ; and on the i5th of March, 1870, the Eev. Henry 
M. Williamson was installed in the pastoral charge. 

FITZEOY AVENUE. 

In 1820, the Eev. John Edgar (afterwards D.D.) was 
ordained to the pastoral charge of a small Seceding 
congregation recently erected in Belfast. At the time 
of his ordination his little flock possessed no place of 
worship, and continued for a considerable period to meet 
and celebrate religious ordinances in a small building 
in a back lane in the neighbourhood of Waring Street. 
At length by dint of begging, not only in Belfast, but in 
England and Scotland, the young minister contrived to 
obtain funds for the erection of a very humble sanctuary. 
It was built in what had formerly been little better than a 
quagmire ; and, on the day on which it was opened for public 
worship, those who repaired to it had to find their way along 
planks laid to pi'event them from sinking into the mire. But 
its young pastor soon proved that he was no ordinary man ; his 
zeal and eloquence began to attract more and more attention ; 
and in 1829, when he commenced the Temperance Eeformation, 
he had already acquired a high reputation. The little meeting- 
house at length proved insufficient for the accommodation of 
the increasing flock ; and in 1836 a larger and more orna- 
mental church was erected in its immediate vicinity. To this 
edifice the congregation was transferred ; but the little 



60 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

original building was preserved as a mission house; a minister 
was put in charge of it ; and gradually another congregation 
was collected. Several other congregations were subsequently- 
organised in the same place — one hive, as it were, swarming 
off and permitting another to take possession. Meanwhile 
the Synod of Ulster and the Secession Synod became united : 
and in 1848, Dr. Edgar, now professor of Divinity for the 
General Assembly, resigned the pastoral charge. He was suc- 
ceeded by the Rev. G-eorge Shaw, who was ordained on the 
27th of June, 1849. Since that time a great change has taken 
place in the state of the town. Many buildings then occupied as 
dwelling-houses have been entirely devoted to business pur- 
poses : and a large portion of the population has been 
gradually removing to the suburbs. Thus it has been found 
necessary to erect new churches in what not many years ago 
were town parks. The second church erected by Dr. Edgar 
in Alfred Street was not long since sold to be converted into 
a large mercantile establishment ; and in its stead one of the 
most beautiful ecclesiastical structures in the North of Ireland 
has been built for the use of Mr. Shaw's congregation in 
Eitzroy Avenue. The new church was opened for j^ublic 
worship in 1874. It has a handsome spire, and has connected 
with it ample accommodation in the way of school-rooms, 
committee-rooms, and lecture-room. The whole has cost 
upwards of de8,000. 

MAT STREET. 

This congregation was erected by the Presbytery of Belfast 
in 1829. The church was specially erected for the Rev. 
Henry Cooke, D.D. (afterwards LL.D.), formerly of Killi- 
leagh. He was installed here on the 24th November, 
1829. Vast crowds attended his ministry when the church 
was opened ; and sometimes the Sabbath collection, mostly 
in halfpence, amounted to .£10. Throughout life he con- 
tinued to be the most popular preacher in the Church, 
Eor the greater j^art of his ministry in Belfast he con- 
ducted three public services in May Street Church every 
Lord's Day. Dr. Cooke died at his house in Ormeau Road 
on the 13th of December, 1868, in the 81st year of his 
age and the 61st of his ministry. His remains were 
honoured by a public funeral — one of the most imposing 
demonstrations which has ever taken place in the town of 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 61 

Belfast. It was attended by the members of the Corporation 
in their robes of office, by the members of the various public 
Boards, by the Professors of the Queen's College and of the 
Presbyterian College in official costume, and by a vast number 
of public officials from various parts of the country. As the 
procession passed through the streets every window was filled 
with spectators, and every place was thronged. He was 
buried in Balmoral Cemetery. Some time before his decease 
he was obliged, in consequence of declining health, to give 
up his pastoral charge ; and on the 4th of March, 1868, Mr. 
John M'Intosh, who had formerly been minister of Connor, 
was installed here. On the 4th of January, 1881, Mr. 
M'Intosh, having accepted a call from the 2nd Presbyterian 
Church of Philadelphia, resigned the care of the congregation; 
and on the 31st of January, 1882, Mr. R. J. Lynd, formerly 
minister of Berry Street, was installed as pastor. The church, 
erected in 1829, and then considered one of the finest 
ecclesiastical buildings in BeKast, has since been much 
improved. 

EOSEMAEY STEEET. 

The first minister in Belfast, after the restoration of 
Presbytery in 1642, was Mr. Anthony Shaw. A session was 
first erected here in 1645, and Mr. Shaw was shortly after- 
wards ordained. He was much persecuted by Ormond's party 
in 1649, and by the Eepublicans in 1650, so that he fled to 
Scotland shortly afterwards, and never returned. The next 
minister was Mr. "William Keyes, who was settled here in 
1660. Mr. Keyes had at one time also charge of Carrickfergus, 
but of this he was relieved in 1672, when the people of 
Belfast undertook to pay him an annual stipend of ^£60. In 
July of the same year, he was sent to supply the congrega- 
tion of Bull- Alley in Dublin, where he continued till December, 
when they presented him with a call. Belfast, however, 
opposed his removal, sending in January, 1673, Mr. William 
Muir, and Michael and John Briggart, as their commissioners 
to the Presbytery ; but the committee of all the Presbyteries 
in April confirmed his removal to Dublin. On this the con- 
gregation sent Mr. Anderson and Mr. Chalmers, as their 
commissioners to the Presbytery, to object once more against 
it, but the matter having been issued by the committee, 
the Presbytery would not interfere. In May, Mr. Keyes, 



62 HISTORY OF CONGKEGATIONS. 

himself applied to be permitted to remain liei'e, stating " that 
Lady Donegall was dissatisfied at his removal, and likely to 
be prejudiced against the Presbytery on that account." At 
this time Lady Donegall appears to have been at least an 
occasional attendant on Presbyterian ordinances. Mr. Keyes 
was, however, obliged to remove to Dublin, and the Presby- 
tery wrote vindicating their j^roceedings to Lady Donegall, 
and continued to supply the vacant congregation. In January, 
1674, the Presbytery sent two of their members to wait on 
Lord and Lady Donegall to deal with them "for the people's 
liberty to choose whom they please, with the meeting's 
consent, according to principles owned by us." In the 
succeeding April, Messrs. Hall and Cunningham, the two 
brethren appointed to execute this commission, reported that 
they had conferred with the Countess of Donegall, who 
"promised she would be no hindrance to the settling of a 
godly minister in Belfast ; " and, in the end of the same 
month, they obtained a favourable answer from Lord Donegall. 
In May, William Moore and Alexander Arthur, are their 
commissioners to the Presbytery, and on July 7th, they gave 
a call to Mr. Patrick Adair,* minister at Cairncastle, who, 
after the other Presbyteries had been consulted, was declared 
transported to Belfast, on October 13th, 1674. He remained 
in this charge till his death in the beginning of the year 1694. 
At the Synod in June, 1694, Mr. William Crawford, sove- 
reign of Belfast, Mr. David Smith, burgess, and others, 
appeared as the commissioners from Belfast, requesting that 
Mr. John M'Bride, minister of Clare, should be transported 
to them, which was soon after granted, and he was accord- 
ingly installed here in October, 1694. In 1706 they called 
Mr. James Kirkpatrick, minister at Templepatrick, to become 
the assistant and successor of Mr. M'Bride, who was now 
absent in Scotland, but the Synod refused their request, 
though they granted suj^plies. Towards the end of the year 

1706, Mr. Kirkpatrick was, however, settled in Belfast. In 

1707, the Presbytery divided the congregation, and in 1708, 
Mr. Kirkpatrick took charge of the new erection. A com- 
mittee of Synod met in Belfast, in September, 1708, to be 
present at the division of the congregation. The old congre- 

* Mr. Adair was the author of a work long preserved in manuscript, 
and not long since published under the title of "Adair's Narrative." 
He was married to the daughter of Sir Robert Adair, the proj)rietor of 
the Ballymena estate, and the ancestor of Lord Waveney. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 63 

gation had complained of the conduct of the Presbytery in 
encouraging the division, and their commissioners to the 
Synod of 1708 were Mr. Andrew Maxwell, Mr. Henry Chads, 
and Mr. John Black, elders ; with Edward Bryce, Esq., 
Dr. Peacock, Mr. Isaac Macartney, Mr. Robert Lennox, Mr. 
Eichard Ashmore, Mr. Samuel Smith, Mr. John M'Munn, 
Mr. Grilbert Moore, and some others. In 1718, they called 
Mr. Abernethy, of Antrim, to be assistant and successor to 
Mr. M'Bride, but the Synod determined against his removal. 
Mr. M'Bride, died July 21st, 1718. They then called Mr. 
Fleming, minister of Lurgan, but the Synod in 1719 deter- 
mined against his transportation. They at last obtained 
Mr. Samuel Haliday, jun., who was installed here July 28th, 
1720. At this time lax views began to make their appearance 
in the Synod of Ulster ; and the ministers of Eosemary 
Street identified themselves with the New-Light party. In 
consequence a large number of their hearers withdrew from 
their pastoral care, erected another place of worship in a 
tenement immediately adjoining; and called Mr. Charles 
Masterton, previously minister of Connor, to occupy the 
pulpit of their new meeting-house. Mr. Masterton was in- 
stalled here towards the end of the year 1722. The com- 
missioners of the congregation, Mr. Samuel Smith and Mr. 
Jo. Young complained to the Synod in 1724, of several 
grievances from the tardiness of the two other congregations 
to grant dismissions to people wishing to join them. Mr. 
Masterton was at the Synod of 1745, but he appears to have 
resigned shortly afterwards, as in 1746 the people applied to 
the Synod for supplies of preaching. In 1747 the Synod 
sanctioned the removal of Mr. William Laird from Eay to 
Belfast on the promise of d870 per annum during Mr. 
Masterton' s life, and at his death .£80 and an assistant 
minister supported, or =£100 if Mr. Laird undertook the 
whole charge. Mr. Laird was accordingly installed here by 
the Presbytery of Bangor, on the 16th of September, 1747. 
Mr. Masterton died July 15th, 1750. Mr. Laird becoming 
infirm, Mr. Sinclair Kelburne, was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Belfast on the 8th of February, 1780. Mr. 
Laird died on the 8th of December, 1791. He was the 
great-grandfather of Sir Thomas M'Clure, Bart. On the 
first Tuesday of November, 1799, Mr. Kelburne resigned 
this charge on account of the precarious state of his health 
and bodily infirmity ; and was succeeded by Mr. Samuel 



64 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

Hanna, forinerly minister of Drumbo, who was installed here 
on the 11th of December, 1799. Mr. Kelburne died March 
31st, 1802. Mr. (afterwards Dr.), Hanna in 1838 obtained 
leave for his congregation to choose an assistant and successor ; 
and in 1840, Mr. (afterwards Dr.), Gibson was elected his 
assistant and successor. Dr. Gibson resigned this charge in 
1847 on his appointment as Professor of Christian Ethics ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. John Macnaughtan, formerly of 
Paisley, who was installed here on the 25th of October, 1849. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. Macnaughtan obtained as his assistant 
Mr. William Park, formerly minister of 1st Ballymena, who 
was installed here on the 2nd of September, 1873. Mr. 
Macnaughtan died on the 27th of May, 1884. 

TOWNSEKD STREET. 

This church is connected with a new era in the History of 
Pi-esbyterianism in Belfast. When its establishment was 
first contemplated the town did not reckon more than the 
fifth part of its present number of inhabitants ; but it was 
increasing with wonderful rapidity, and the amount of church 
accommodation was quite inadequate. A large and com- 
modious piece of ground, situate in the midst of the working 
class population, was kindly granted in perjietuity, at a merely 
nominal rent, by the Rev. John Brown, an excellent Episcopal 
minister, and Allen Brown, Esq. ; and in the axitumn of 1838, 
the foundation stone of the new edifice was laid by the then 
Marquis of Donegal. The services on the occasion were con- 
ducted by Drs. Hanna and Cooke, and Messrs. Bellis and 
Morgan. In the spring of 1835 the building was ready for 
the accommodation of worshippers, and it was then opened by 
the Rev. Dr. Norman M'Leod, of Campsie, father of the still 
more celebrated Dr. M'Leod, of Glasgow, whose death a few 
years ago was so much lamented. The collection at the 
opening service amounted to d£130. On the 2nd of February, 
1836, the Rev. Josias Wilson was installed as its first minister. 
Mr. Wilson laboured here for several years with great zeal 
and acceptance, and gathered around him a numerous con- 
gregation. On the 7th of October, 1844, Mr. Wilson resigned 
the charge, having received a call to River Terrace, London ; 
and on the 29th of November of the same year, the Rev. John 
Weir, formerly of Newry, was inducted as minister. On the 
6th of July, 1847, Mr. Weir resigned the charge, and removed 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 65 

to London ; and on the 21st of September of the same year, 
the Rev. William Johnston (now D.D.), formerly minister of 
Berry Street congregation, was installed in Townsend Street. 
The congregation has flourished greatly vmder Dr. Johnston. 
Meanwhile, the structure erected in 1833 having exhibited 
various indications of decay, it was i*esolved to build on the 
old site a new and more commodious edifice. The present 
Presbyterian Church of Townsend Street is one of the best 
and most handsome in the Assembly. It is furnished with 
all the needful accompaniments of school-rooms, lecture hall, 
and other useful apartments. It cost upwards of .£11,000, 
and was opened free of debt on Sabbath, the 15th October, 
1878, by the Rev, W. F. Stevenson, D.D., Eathgar, and the 
Eev. Francis Petticrew, D.Lit., Faughanvale. 

YORK STREET. 

Fifty years ago the population of Belfast was increasing 
with amazing rapidity ; and the Rev. James Morgan, who 
shortly before had been installed as the first minister of 
Fisherwick Place, became deeply impressed with the import- 
ance of providing for the spiritual wants of the new inhabi- 
tants. But when he proposed to erect a Presbyterian church 
in York Street, many i*egarded the project with no great 
favour, thinking that there was already sufiicient accommo- 
dation for all who were likely to attend on Sabbath oixlinances. 
His own capacious meeting-house had been recently ei'ected ; 
the large Presbyterian church of May Street had been built 
soon afterwards ; and the Presbyterian chiirch of Townsend 
Street had been only lately opened. But the minister of 
Fisherwick Place persevered, and his efforts were at length 
crowned with success. Throughout he was much encouraged 
by Dr. Cooke, who was so well pleased with the result that 
he pleasantly suggested St. James', after the Christian name 
of its originator, as the proper designation for the new 
ecclesiastical structure. On the 11th of February, 1840, the 
Rev. David Hamilton, who had previously been minister of 
Connor, was installed as pastor, and for nearly twenty years 
he occupied the pulpit with much acceptance and eflficiency. 
In the year of the great awakening (1869) he was unremitt- 
ing in his exertions, and it was believed that his health was 
then undermined by excessive toil. He died of fever on the 
13th of January, 1860. The vast multitude in attendance on 



66 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

his funeral attested the respect entertained for him by the 
whole community. He "was succeeded as minister of York 
Street by Mr. David Hanson, who had previously been 
minister of Fahan, and who was installed here on the 20th 
of September, 1860. His ministry was short, as he died 
here in the prime of life on the 8th of January, 1865. By 
this time Mr. Thomas Hamilton, the eldest son of the first 
minister, was nearly ready for licence ; and the congregation 
testified at once their deep respect for the father, and their 
high expectations in reference to the son, by electing the 
young licentiate to the vacant office. Mr. Thomas Hamilton 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Belfast on the 22nd 
of August, 1865. He has recently signalised himself by 
carrying off a prize of dSlOO for an essay on the Sabbath from 
upwards of 240 competitors. 

BELTUEBET. 

This place began to be supplied with preaching by the 
Synod of Ulster in 1709. About the same time the Synod also 
commenced preaching in Carrickmacross. On the 23rd of 
March, 1714, Mr. Robert Thompson was ordained as minister 
of Belturbet. But he did not long retain the charge in con- 
sequence of the insufiiciency of his maintenance. He resigned 
it in 1721 . The place now remained long without a minister. 
At length, in 1854, the Presbytery of Cavan reported to the 
Assembly that they had established a mission station in this 
town ; and on the 28th of June of the same year they ordained 
Mr. Robert Jamieson to the pastoral charge. Having accepted 
a call from the Missionary Directors, Mr. Jamieson resigned 
the charge on the 8th of January, 1856, and subsequently 
proceeded to Canada. He was succeeded as minister of 
Belturbet by Mr. James ThomjDSon, who was ordained here 
on the 27th of June, 1856. 

BENBUEB. 

Benbueb is classic ground. On the 5th of June, 1646, 
the Scottish forces, led on by Monro, here encountered the 
Irish Confederates under the famous Owen Roe O'Neill, and 
sustained a complete overthrow. Had O'lSTeill followed up 
his victory, he might have crushed the Scots in Ulster ; but, 
as if given up to infatuation, he marched away southwards, 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. Q7 

and permitted tlie Covenanters to recruit their streuo-tb. 
Thus his triumjih proved almost fruitless. There were 
Presbyterians in and around Benburh perhaps ever since the 
time of this memorable battle. A Mr. Walkinshaw appears 
to have been minister here shortly after the Restoration, but 
of him little is known. He was succeeded by Mr. Archibald 
Hamilton, son of Mr. James Hamilton, nephew of Lord 
Claneboy, and minister of Bally waiter. Mr. Hamilton settled 
at Benburb about 1670, and continued in this charge till 
1672. He seems to have been very j^oorly supported ; and in 
consecpience, he removed to Armagh towards the close of 
1672. He is said to have been succeeded by Mr. James 
Johnson, who died here. The next minister was Mr. John 
Boyd, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Tyrone 
on the 17th of July, 1706. He died October 16th, 1712. 
He was succeeded by Mr. John Kennedy, who was ordained 
here on the 13th of July, 1714. Mr. Kennedy died in this 
charge on the 25th of June, 1761, at the age of 77. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Alexander Johnson, who was ordained here 
on the 23rd of May, 1763. He died August 9th, 1771, leaving 
neither widow nor family, and aged 52 years. He was 
succeeded by Mr. James Whiteside, jun., probably son of 
Mr. James Whiteside, sen., of Tobermore. He was ordained 
here on the 23rd of December, 1772. Becoming infirm, Mr. 
Joshua Willis was ordained his assistant on the 31st of March, 
1815. Mr. Whiteside died on the 18th of May, 1821, leavmg 
a widow and family. In March, 1822, Mr. Willis was sus- 
pended for one month for celebrating marriage irregularly. 
He was afterwards suspended and dis-annexed ; and, after a 
long vacancy, Mr. James Fullarton was ordained here by a 
Committee of the Synod of Ulster, on the 2nd of December, 
1836. In June following he resigned the charge, and emigrated 
to Australia. The next minister was Mr. Hugh Montgomery, 
who was ordained here on the 20th of June, 1838. Mr. 
Montgomery died on the 24th of December, 1873. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Gawn Malcom who was ordained here on 
the 26th of August, 1874. On the 11th of April, 1876, Mr. 
Malcom resigned this charge on his acceptance of a call from 
a congregation in England ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Clements, formerly minister of Tartaraghan, who 
was installed here on the 21st of June, 1876. 



68 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

BILLY OR BUSHMILLS. 

The first minister of this congregation was Mr. Jeremiah 
O'Quin, a native Irishman, educated by Mr. Upton, of 
Temj^lepatrick. Mr. O'Quin was settled here by the Presby- 
tery in the year 1646. In consequence of refusing to join in 
the protest against the execution of Charles I., and for taking 
part with the Republicans and Independents, he was sus- 
pended by the Presbytery in April, 1649. He was subsequently 
restored. He was here in 1656, being mentioned by 
Livingstone among his acquaintances. He died on the last 
day of January, 1657. He was succeeded, as minister of 
Billy, by Mr. Gabriel Cornwall, who was here for perhaps 
twenty years. He seems to have been succeeded by Mr. 
Adam White, who was here in 1691. He had been minister 
of Ardstraw previously. He died minister of Billy on the 
19th of December, 1708. The next minister was Mr. John 
Porter, who was ordained at Bushmills, on the 28th of July, 
1713. He died in this charge on the 13th of June, 1738. 
On the death of Mr. Porter the people split into parties in 
favour of different candidates; and in 1742 their Com- 
missioner, Mr. Adam Auld, supplicated the Synod of Ulster 
to grant them a new poll. Mr. John Logue was at length 
ordained on the 1st of July, 1746. At this time the people 
of Dunluce belonged to the congregation, but some years 
afterwards they were erected into a separate charge. In 
November, 1756, Mr. Logue removed to Buckna, of which he 
was the first minister. He was succeeded by Mr. Samuel 
Moore, who was eventually degraded. The next minister 
was Mr. Hugh Moore, who was ordained here on the 26th of 
September, 1779. In 1780 he removed to Usher's Quay, 
Dublin, and was succeeded by Mr. William Douglass, who 
was ordained here on the 1st of February, 1783. He died in 
this charge on the 29th of May, 1794, leaving a widow and 
family. The next minister was Mr. Daniel M'Kee, who was 
ordained here on the 22nd of November, 1796. On the 13th 
of June, 1820, he was set aside for drunkenness. He was 
succeeded in the charge by Mr. Hugh Hamill, who was 
ordained here on the 28th of November, 1820. Mr. Hamill 
died on the 31st of March, 1864; and on the 19th of 
November of the same year the Rev. James Boyle was 
ordained to the pastoral charge. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 69 



BOAEDMILLS. 



BoARDMiLLS is One of the earliest of the congregations estab- 
lished by the Seceders in Ireland. Its first minister was Mr. 
Andrew Black, who was installed here on the 22nd of June, 
1749. He had formerly been minister of Cumbernauld in 
Scotland. He was present at the formation of the first 
Burgher Presbytery constituted in Ireland, and was one of 
its members. This Presbytery was formed on the 24th of 
July, 1751. After a ministry of 33 years here, Mr. Black 
died at Boardmills on the 6th of July, 1782, in the 82nd year 
of his age. The next minister was Mr. Joseph Longmoore, 
who was ordained in 1784. After a ministry of 25 years he 
died on the 10th of October, 1809, and was succeeded by Mr. 
John Sturgeon, whose ministry was of thirty years' duration. 
He died on the 22nd December, 1840. Meanwhile Mr. 
George H. Shanks, who was ordained on the 13th of October, 
1840, had been appointed his assistant and successor. 

BOVEVA. 

It would appear that the first minister here was Mr. Hans 
Stewart, a licentiate of the Presbytery of Linlithgow. He 
seems to have been settled as minister of Boveva in 1701. 
He died on the 6th of May, 1737. He was succeeded by Mr. 
John Lyle, who was oi'dained here in 1738. He died in this 
charge on the 20th of May, 1765. The next minister was 
Mr. William Stewart, who was ordained here on the 18th of 
June, 1770. His ministry was of short duration. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Samuel Patton, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Derry on the 20th of August, 1773. Mr. 
Patton removed in the following year to Moueyrea. He was 
succeeded by the Rev. Francis Gray, who was ordained here 
some time afterwards. He continued in this charge till his 
death on the 2nd of August, 1817. The next minister was 
Mr. Henry Kyd, who was ordained here on the 7th of June, 
1818. Mr. Kyd was a man of singular piety, and displayed 
considerable ability as a writer. He died in this charge on 
the 4th of June, 1839. After a lengthened vacancy, Mr. Adam 
Magill was ordained to the pastoral charge on the 8th of 
March, 1843. 



70 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

BRIGH. 

The first minister of Brigli or Donaghendry, was Mr, 
Archibald Hamilton, who was settled here in 1630, and ejected 
in 1661. He died in 1674. His tombstone is in the church- 
yard there. He was succeeded by Mr. John Abernethy, the 
ejected minister of Aghaloo or Minterburn, who continued 
here about ten years and removed to Moneymore. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Alexander Osborne, who held this charge 
till January, 1688, when he was removed to Dublin. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Robert Hamilton in the end of the same 
year. In 1691 we find their commissioner, Mr. Richard 
Spier, supplicating the Synod that Mr. Hamilton may be 
pei'mitted to remain with them, though they cannot give him 
above ^20 per annum. It would appear that shortly after- 
wards he resigned the charge and removed to Bangor. The 
next minister was Mr. Thomas Kennedy, son of the minister 
of Carlan, who was ordained here on the 6th of November, 
1700. In 1708 the people complained that they would be 
injured by a new erection at Coagh ; but the Synod deemed 
them still sufiicient to support a minister. Mr. Kennedy died 
in this charge on the 3rd of July, 1746. He was succeeded by 
Mr. John White, who was ordained here on the 23rd of July, 
1747. He died on the 20th of October, 1787. The next 
minister was Mr. Thomas M'Kay, who was ordained here on 
the 1st of August, 1788. He died in this charge on the 19th 
of December, 1821, aged sixty- six. After much disputing, 
Mr. James Denham, afterwards D.D., was ordained here by 
a Synodical Committee on the 11th of July, 1826. Receiving 
a call to Derry, he resigned this charge on the 20th of April, 
1837, and was succeeded by Mr. Samuel H. Elder, who was 
ordained here on the 1st of Axigust, 1837. Mr. Elder died on 
the 11th of October, 1844 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John 
Maxwell, who was ordained here on the 30th of June, 1847. 
Mr. Maxwell died on the 29th of June, 1883 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. John Huey Morton, who was ordained here 
on the 15th of January, 1884. 

BROUGHSHANE 1st. 

This congregation was originally called Braid, and had for 
its first minister the Rev. John Douglass, who was ordained 
here in August, 1655. He was succeeded by the Rev. Fulk 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 71 

White, who was ordained July 6th, 1687. The congregation 
engaged to pay Mr. White a stipend of .£20 in money and 16 
bolls of corn yearly. This minister was well acquainted with 
Hebrew, and was in the habit of giving instruction in that 
language to candidates for the ministry. He died August 
24th, 1716.* About two months prior to his decease, his son, 
Mr. James White, was ordained his assistant and successor. 
The Rev. James White was long an influential minister of 
the Synod of Ulster ; and from him John White, Esq., of 
Whitehall, near Broughshane, late High-Sheriff of the County 
Antrim, is lineally descended. He died April 24th, 1761. He 
had become infirm long prior to his death ; and, in consequence, 
on the 13th of January, 1756, the Rev. Alexander M'Mullan 
was ordained his assistant. Mr. M'Miillan removed to 
Cullybackey about two years afterwards, and was succeeded 
in Broughshane by the Rev. Charles Brown, who was ordained 
in October, 1759. From this minister the great merchant 
princes of the same name, of Liverpool and the United States 
of America, are collaterally descended. Mr. Brown died in 
September, 1810. In the May of the preceding year, the Rev. 
Robert Stewart was ordained his assistant and successor. 
At that time little attention was paid to the question of 
Sabbath sanctification ; and even in cases where the election 
of a minister was strenuously contested, it was not unusual to 
take the poll of the congregation on the Lord's Day. When 
a candidate for the pastoral charge of Broughshane, Mr. 
Stewart encountered a vigorous opposition ; and the voting, 
which commenced after public worship on Sunday, was con- 
tinued till nine or ten o'clock at night. The Synod of Ulster 
at length saw the impi'opriety of permitting a poll to be taken 
on the day of sacred rest ; and it is said that the Broughshane 
election terminated the history of this species of Sabbath 
desecration. Mr. Stewart early distinguished himself in the 
Synod, as an able debater, and in 1816 was chosen Moderator. 
He excelled in quick repartee, in clear discrimination, and in 
fai'-seeing sagacity. In 1827 he had a remarkable discussion 
with the Rev. B. M'Auley, Parish Priest of Bally mena, on the 
subject of the Papal Supremacy. This discussion, which 
took place in the courthouse of Ballymena, and which con- 
tinued for three days, excited uncommon interest. Whilst it 

* There is a graveyard attached to the 1st Presbyterian Church of 
Broughshane ; and the first body buried in it is said to have been the 
remains of a soldier of King William III. 



72 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

was going on, Mr. Stewart was occasionally to be seen looking 
into a cliest of books wLicli was beside him, and wliich he 
was obviously searching for authoi'ities, when, at the same 
time, he was conducting a vigorous argument, and replying 
most effectively to some previous statements of his antagonist. 
In all intricate and important negociations he was usually 
employed by the Synod of Ulster. During the Arian contro- 
versy he exhibited great tact and coolness ; and his speech in 
1828, in support of the celebrated overtures, and in answer 
to Dr. Montgomery, was one of the happiest efforts of his 
eloquence. In 1843 he was elected Moderator of the General 
Assembly. He frequently visited London and Dublin, on 
deputations to Government. He died on the 26th of 
September, 1852, and his funeral was attended by an immense 
multitude. He was succeeded by Mr. Archibald Robinson, 
who was ordained here on the 23rd of August, 1853. 



BUCKNA. 

In the year 1756 the inhabitants of this place applied to 
the Synod of Ulster to be erected into a congregation. The 
application, though opposed on the part of the congregation 
of Broughshane, was granted. The first minister was Mr. 
John Logue, formerly of Billy or Bushmills, who was 
installed here on the 5th of November, 1756. He removed 
to America in 1772 ; and was succeeded by Mr. David Park, 
who was ordained here on the 26th of July, 1773. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. Richard Dill was ordained his assistant on the 
13th of February, 1810. He resigned this charge on the 
11th of February, 1812, and removed to Drumachose. Mr. 
Park died on the 10th of March, 1814, leaving a widow and 
family. The next minister was Mr. William M'Clintock 
Wray, who was ordained here on the 15th of November, 
1815. Mr. Wray died on the 14th of November, 1848 ; and 
was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Hamilton, who was ordained 
here on the 5th of September, 1849. On the 29th of 
September, 1873, Mr. Hamilton retired from the discharge 
of the active duties of the ministry ; and, on the 17th of 
March, 1874, Mr, John Huey was ordained as his successor. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 73 

BURT. 

This congregation and Derry appear to have teen originally 
a united charge. The first separate minister of Burt was 
Mr. William Hempton, a licentiate of the Presbytery of 
Dean, in Scotland, who was ordained here in September, 
1673. Mr. Hempton appears to have retm-ned to Scotland 
at the Revolution. His successor, Mr. Andrew Ferguson, 
who had been licensed in Scotland in 1689, came to Burt in 
1690. Under him the congregation increased considerably, 
and in June, 1691, the Presbytery of Lagan required them 
to make an addition to the meeting-house. In 1695 Mr. 
Ferguson was called to Corboy or Longford ; but the Synod 
decided that he should remain in Burt. In 1697 there was 
a dispute between Burt and Derry respecting their relative 
boundaries. In January, 1698, the Presbytery ordered 
" that the liberties of the city on that side the water wherein 
the city standeth should be the bounds of the congregation ;" 
but Burt was dissatisfied with the decision, and appealed to 
the next meeting of Synod. When Mr. Ferguson became 
infirm, his son, Mr. Andrew Ferguson, juu., was appointed 
his successor. He was ordained by the Presbytery of Derry, 
February 16th, 1725. His father died on the 18th of July 
following. Mr. Andrew Fei'guson, jun., was the great- 
grandfather of Sir R. A. Ferguson, Bai-t., at one time M.P. 
for the city of Derry. Becoming infirm, Mr. Hugh Brooke 
was ordained his assistant November 5th, 1783. Mr. 
Ferguson died January 30th, 1787. His funeral sermon, 
which was preached by the Rev. Andrew Alexander, of Urney, 
was subsequently published. In this discourse it is stated 
that " when he had numbered above eighty years, he dis- 
cerned the same ardour in reading, conversing, and writing 
on various subjects for which he was distinguished at an 
earlier period ;" and that " by Providence he was endowed 
with an ample fortune, which he enjoyed with moderation, 
and employed, as a man of virtue, in kind offices to his 
friends, in a decent hospitality, and acts of charity to the 
distressed." Mr. Brooke long ministered to the congregation 
of Burt, but at length becoming infirm, the Rev. Robert 
Gray, formerly minister of Dungiven, was installed his 
assistant on the 15th of October, 1833. Mr. Brooke* died on 

* The Misses Brooke, the daughters of this minister, have distin- 
guished themselves by iheir muniticent contributions to the Irish 
Presbyterian Church, 



74 HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

the 17th of June, 1839. Mr. Gray died on the 19th of 
October, 1857 ; and was succeeded by Mr. H. P. Charlton, 
who was installed here on the 19th of October, 1858. Mr. 
Charlton resigned this charge on the 3rd of JSToveniber, 1875, 
on his removal to Scotland; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Clarke, who was installed here on the 27th of July, 
1876. On his removal to 2nd Bangor, Mr. Clarke resigned 
this charge on the 28th of July, 1879 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Robert W. Hamilton, who was ordained here on the 
30th of January, 1880. Mr. Hamilton has since removed to 
2nd Lisburn. 

CAIENCASTLE. 

Patrick Adair* was ordained the first minister here, May 
7th, 1646. The congregation was visited in March, 1674, 
and the following account returned : — " That they were 
considerably in arrear for every year of four, concluding at 
All Saints, 1672, and the year commencing at that and 
concluding at All Saints, 1673, not yet ap plotted ; and no 
mention of this year current." In October, 1674, Mr. Adair 
was removed to Belfast, and we find Mr. John Campbell 
ordained here, May 2nd, 1677. He resided for a time in 
Belfast during the summer of 1685. In February, 1689, he 
retired on account of the ai>proaching troubles to Scotland, 
and in April, 1690, there came a letter from Mr. George 
Meldrum and Mr. Verner, in the name of the Presbytery of 
Irwin, showing that Mr. Campbell had now a call from the 
parish of Newmills there. He returned, however, in the end 
of April. In March, 1691, Mr. Walter Campbell, of Walter- 
haughs, ajjpeared a commissioner from Lowdon, in the 
Presbytery of Irwin, with a letter from the Earl of Lowdon, 
seeking the removal of Mr. Campbell thither. The Presby- 
tery, however, resolved not to loose him from Cairncastle. 
In 1700 he asked advice of Synod, stating that he had an 
invitation from Largs and an offer from the Captain of 
Dunoon in that neighbourhood to settle all his estate upon 
him and his family in case he would settle near him at 
Largs. In the beginning of 1714 he ultimately removed to 
Scotland on this invitation. His successor was Mr. William 
Taylor, son of Mr. William Taylor, minister of Drumaul or 
Eandalstown, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 

* The author of " Adair's Narrative." 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 75 

Antrim on the 14tli of June, 1715. He joined the non- 
subscribing Presbytery of Antrim in 1725 ; but at his death, 
in May, 1734, the congregation reverted to the Presbytery 
of Templepatrick, and by it Mr. John Lewson was ordained 
here on the 20th of December, 1738. Mr. Lewson becoming 
infirm, Mr. Thomas Alexander was ordained here as his 
assistant and successor on the 17th of December, 1793. Mr. 
Lewson died September 15th, 1802, leaving a family. In 
1829 Mr. Alexander and a small part of the congregation 
seceded from the Synod of Ulster and held the meeting- 
house. The people adhering to the Synod gave a call to 
Mr. James Carmichael, who was ordained here on the 24tli 
of May, 1832, Mr. Carmichael becoming infirm, obtained 
as his assistant and successor Mr. Samuel Edgar Stewart, 
who was ordained here on the 25th of July, 1871. Mr. 
Carmichael died on the 28th of July, 1873. Mr. Stewart 
resigned the pastoral chai'ge on the 30th of October, 1882, 
on his removal to Carrickfergus ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
John Christie, who was ordained here on the 2ud of October, 
1883. 

CARLAN. 

This congregation was originally known by the name of 
Donoughmore (County Tyrone) , and included in it the town 
of Dungannon, by which name also it was early distinguished. 
Its first minister was Mr. Thomas Kennedy. He was 
one of the Presbyterian worthies who lost their livings 
at the Restoration. He was dej)osed in 1661 ; but he 
settled at Carlan-bridge, where he continued in the exercise 
of his ministry. He was afterwards called Mr. Thomas 
Kennedy senior, to distinguish him from Mr. Thomas 
Kennedy "junior, minister of Ballyclug or Brigh. At the 
Revolution he fled to Scotland. In September, 1691, the 
congregation applied to Synod to procure his return, offering 
".£19 per annum, and this year to plough and sow ten acres 
of land, if he will come over by May next, and they having 
not above a tenth-part of the land there yet planted, they are 
very hopeful, in a short time after his coming thither that their 
land may be planted and so his yearly maintenance be in- 
creased. They also promised him £,5 towards building a 
dwelling-house." He returned in 1693, and continued here 
till his death in February, 1714. He died at the age of 89. 
At his death the congregation divided, and a part was erected 



76 HISTOEY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

into a separate congregation at Dungannon. Mr. Kennedy was 
succeeded at Donouglimore, or Carlan, by Mr. Robert Stuart, 
who was ordained here August 11th, 1720. He died in this 
charge, April 11th, 1746. He was succeeded by Mr. William 
Kennedy, who was ordained at Carlan, as it was now called, 
on the 2nd of April, 1754. Mr. Kennedy becoming infirm, Mr. 
Robert Stewart was ordained his assistant on the 9th October, 
1798. Mr. Kennedy died April, 9th, 1801, leaving a family. 
Mr. Stewart died in 1812, leaving a family. The next 
minister was Mr. John Hogg, who was ordained here on the 
31st of October, 1815. Mr. Hogg died on the 5th of December, 
1846, having previously obtained leave to retire from the 
active duties of the ministry ; and on the 29th September, 
1846, Mr. Stewart Carse was ordained his successor. 

CARLINGFORD. 

Carlingford and Dundalk originally formed a joint charge. 
The first minister was Mr. John Wilson, who was ordained 
here about 1700. In 1707, Dundalk was erected into a 
separate charge, and Mr. Wilson then became exclusively 
the minister of Carlingford. In 1729, Mr. Wilson emigrated 
to America. He was succeeded in Cai'lingford by Mr. 
Alexander Reed, who was ordained to the joint charge of 
Carlingford and Narrowwater on the 16th of November, 1731. 
He died in this charge on the 19th of November, 1737. The 
next minister was Mr. George Henry, who was ordained at 
Narrowwater by the Presbytery of Armagh on the 4th of 
October, 1743. He resigned these charges in May, 1764, and 
went to America. The next minister was Mr. Robert 
Dickson, who was ordained here on the 24th of November, 
1765. He was elected Clerk to the Synod of Ulster in 1787. 
He died October 7th, 1804, leaving a family, and was 
succeeded by Mr. Samuel Arnold, who was ordained to the 
joint charge of Carlingford and Narrowwater on the 2nd 
September, 1805. In 1819, the Presbytery of Armagh in- 
formed the Synod that the persons now worshipping in 
Carlingford were so few, and the augmentation of their 
numbers so very improbable that Mr. Arnold's usefulness as 
a minister would be greater were he to discontinue his present 
practice of preaching there every sixth Sabbath, and devote 
his whole time to Narrowwater. The Synod partly sanctioned 
this arrangement ; and in 1820, Mr. Arnold withdrew entirely 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. ^^ 

from Carlingford. Carlingford, however, continued to be 
supplied with preaching till 1821, when it was erected into a 
separate congregation, and Mr. James Lunn was ordained 
here on the 31st of July of that yeai*. Mr. Lunn joined the 
Remonstrants in 1829, and afterwards the Presbyterian 
interest in Carlingford became virtually defunct. But the 
cause there has recently revived. The Px-esbyterians of Car- 
lingford have been formed into a congregation under the 
care of the Assembly, and on the 29th of March, 1869, Mr. 
William J. M'Cully was ordained to the pastoral charge of 
Omeath and Carlingford. A comfortable Church has since 
been erected in the town of Carlingford. 

CAELOW. 

This had once been a congregation under the Synod of 
Munster, but had become extinct about the year 1750. 
Preaching was revived in it early in 1818, and it was shortly 
afterwards erected into a congregation under the care of 
the Synod of Ulster and Presbytery of Dublin. Its first 
minister was Mr. James Morgan (afterwards D.D., of Belfast) 
who was ordained here on the 21st of June, 1820. He 
resigned this charge on the 19th of May, 1824, on his 
removal to Lisburn. The next minister was Mr. Edward 
Alexander, who was ordained June 23rd, 1825. He resigned 
the charge on the 5th of April, 1828, and was succeeded 
by Mr. William Blood, who was ordained on the 20th of 
March, 1830. Mr. Alexander died at Belfast in November, 
1832 ; and Mr. Blood resigned the charge in August, 
1835, and removed, first to England, and afterwards to 
America. The next minister was Mr. Warrand Carlile, who 
was ordained here on the 26th of May, 1837. Mr. Carlile 
resigned the charge on the 1st of November, 1842, and 
became a missionary to Jamaica. He was succeeded by 
Mr. David M'Taggart, who was ordained here on the 8th of 
March, 1843.. Mr. M'Taggart resigned the charge on the 
26th of June, 1848, and connected himself with the Estab- 
lished Church of Scotland ; and, on the 1st of November 
following, Mr. John Powell, who had previously been minister 
of Bray, was installed as pastor. In 1855 Mr. Powell resigned 
the charge, and was succeeded by Mr. John Barnett, who 
was installed here on the 24th of June, 1856. Mr. Barnett 
resigned the charge on the 3rd of July, 1866, on his removal 



78 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

to Katesbridge, and was succeeded by Mr. R. S. Coffey, who 
was ordained here on the 10th of December, 1866. Mr. Coffey 
resigned this charge on the 18th of February, 1875, on his 
removal to Bandon; and was succeeded by Mr. George 
W. Neely, who was ordained here on the 7th of October, 1875. 
Mr. Neely resigned this charge on the 6th of November, 
1878, having accej^ted a call from the congregation of Malin; 
and was succeeded 'hj Mr. Neil S. Forsythe, who was installed 
here on the 20th of May, 1879. 

CAENDONAGH. 

This congregation, sometimes called Donagh, was pretty 
early settled. In May, 1695, the people called Mr. Robert 
Neilson, a probationer under the care of the Presbytery of 
Lagan, to be their minister. They were required to build a 
meeting-house, but not being found able to support a pastor, 
Mr. Neilson left them about 1698, without having been 
ordained. Mr. Neilson soon after settled at Kilraughts. In 
January, 1701, Mr. Thomas Harvey was ordained here as the 
minister. He died in this charge on the 24th of February, 
1718. The next minister was Mr. Thomas Strawbridge, who 
was ordained here on the 3rd of October, 1721. Mr. Straw- 
bridge died in this charge on the 2nd of April, 1762. The next 
minister appears to have been Mr. Samuel Patton, who was 
here in 1773. He was succeeded by Mr. Robert Scott, who 
was ordained here on the 22nd of November, 1777. Mr. 
Scott resigned this charge through bodily infirmity in 1801, 
and died October 1st, 1803, leaving a widow and family. 
After a long vacancy, Mr. Reuben Rogers was ordained here 
on the 27th September, 1808. Mr. Rogers becoming infirm, 
his son, Mr. Robert L. Rogers, was ordained as his assistant 
and successor on the 2nd of January, 1844. Mr. Reuben 
Rogers died on the 12th of February, 1846 ; and Mr. Robert L. 
Rogers resigned the pastoral charge on the 20th November, 
1847, and was succeeded by Mr. Alexander Pinkerton, who 
was ordained here on the 28th of March, 1848. The Rev. 
Robert Morrison was, on the 16th December, 1884, ordained 
as his assistant and successor. 

CARNMONEY. 

The first minister of this congregation of whom we have 
any account was Mr. James Shaw, who was ordained here in 



HISTORT OF CONGREGATIONS. 79 

May, 1657. He was deposed by Jeremy Taylor in 1661, but, 
notwithstanding, continued privately to officiate among the 
people. In September, 1672, he brouglit his servant, George 
Eussell, before the Presbytery " for conferring with a spirit 
that was in the habit of troubling his dwelling-house," and, 
at the same meeting, asked the advice of the Presbytery 
about holding the communion in the parish. They advised 
him " to delay it a little till the confusion in the parish 
settle a little," and they also appointed a fast to be held 
there on September 17th, which was kept accordingly. Mr. 
Shaw, who never recovei'ed the shock occasioned by these 
suspected evidences of witchcraft, died in December, 1672. 
In March, 1673, the congregation gave a unanimous call to 
his son, Mr. Patrick Shaw, who had been entered on trials 
in April, and was licensed in Sejitember, 1672. After passing 
his second trials he was ordained privately at Larne, 
November 12, 167?, Mr. Cunningham, of Ballycarry, preach- 
ing and presiding on the occasion. Mr. Shaw died in 1683. 
In August, 1684, the congx-egation gave a call to Mr. James 
Bruce, but he declined to accept it. Soon after, refusing 
the advice of the Presbytery relative to their settlement, two 
ministers were sent to remonstrate and to show them that 
" the Presbytery was troubled to see them so self-willed and 
disingenuous." In 1686 they gave a call to Mr. John Munro, 
an ordained Scottish minister at this time in Ireland, who 
accepted it and settled among them. In August, 1688, he 
received a call from his former congregation in Argyleshire, 
and in November, James Wylie, an elder, shows that " the 
rigid dealing of the landlords pursuing after rent occasions 
little done to Mr. Munro, and that in three years they are 
in arrear dS48." The Presbytery, in consequence, threatened 
to permit Mr. Munro to return to Scotland. He continued, 
however, in Carnmoney until the troubles drove him out of 
the country in 1689, when he Avent to Scotland, and did not 
return. In January, 1690, Mr. George Lang, formerly 
minister of ISTewxy, sojourning in this neighbourhood, under- 
took the supplying the congregation till he should be enabled 
to return to his former charge. Mr. Lang returned to Newry 
in May, 1692, when the congi-egation was again thrown 
vacant. The next minister was Mr. Andrew Crawford, son 
of Mr. Thomas Crawford, formerly minister of Donegore, 
who was ordained here about 1695. He died in this charge 
June 7, 1726. He was succeeded by Mr. John Thompson, 



80 HISTOKY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Templepatrick, 
July 14th, 1731, and who died in this charge March 18th, 
1764. He was succeeded by his nephew, Mr. John Thompson, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Dromore, March 
10th, 1767. Mr. Thompson, who was the grandfather of the 
Eev. W. M'Clure, of Londonderry, was long a leading 
minister of the Synod of Ulster. He possessed a remarkably 
vigorous mind united with great dignity of deportment, and, 
at a time when latitudinai-ian views were prevalent in the 
Synod of Ulster, was known as a decided Calvinist. Becom- 
ing infirm, Mr. William Craig was ordained his assistant, 
February 2nd, 1819. Mr. Craig removed to Dromara iu 
December, 1823, and was succeeded by Mr. John Dill, who 
was ordained here May 10th, 1825. Mr. Thompson died 
March 23rd, 1828, in the 87th year of his age and the 62nd 
of his ministry. Mr. Dill died on the 19th of February, 
1841 ; and was succeeded by Mr. David Wilson (now D.D.), 
who was ordained here on the 31st of January, 1844. On 
the 17th of December of the same year Mr. Wilson resigned 
this charge on his removal to Limerick ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Joseph Barkley, who was ordained here on the 28th 
of May, 1845. Mr. Barkley becoming infirm, obtained leave 
for the congregation to choose an assistant, and died on the 
17th of November, 1880. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh 
Waterworth, who was ordained here on the 29th of July, 
1880. 

CAEEICKFERGUS 1st. 

About 1620 Mr. Hubbard removed with his congregation 
from London to this place, where in died in 1623. After him 
Mr. James Glendinnmg resided here as a lecturer, but retired 
to Oldstone about 1625. On the arrival of the Scotch forces 
here, in 1642, Presbyterian worship was re-established and 
conducted regularly by their chaplains. The covenant was 
taken in the church in April, 1644 — the Eev. James Weir 
presiding on the occasion. At length, in the end of the year 
1646, Mr. John Greg became the fixed pastor. He was forced 
to fly from his charge in 1649, when Cromwell and the 
Eegicides obtained the ascendency. The Eev. Timothy 
Taylor, an English Independent, held the parish under the 
Eepublican sway from 1650 till after the Eestoration. In 
1668 he removed to Dublin. The congregation remained 
vacant after his removal, but was supplied every other 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 81 

Sabbath by Mr. Keyes, of Belfast. In December, 1671, Mr. 
Alexander Lees, their commissioner, supplicated the Presby- 
tery that Mr. Keyes mio-ht be settled exclusively with them ; 
but without success, as he was finally confirmed in Belfast in 
February, 1672.* In May, the Presbytery wrote to Scotland 
for Mr. Alexander Grordou, and the congregation sent a com- 
missioner with the lettei". But in November Mr. William 
Mayne appears before the Presbytery as commissioner, and 
declares there is no hope of obtaining Mr. Grordou. In March, 
1673, Baptist Boyd was commissioner to the Presbytery, and 
in May the commissioners were Mr. Robert Dalway, and Mr. 
John Jowland, who expressed their anxiety for the settlement 
of a minister. In June the peoj^le succeeded in obtaining a 
hearing of Mr. Archibald Hamilton, formerly minister of 
Benburb, but now unsettled ; and in July they presented him 
with an unanimous call ; but, the Presbytery of Tyrone 
settling him in Armagh at this time, they were obliged to 
remain yet longer vacant. Mr. Robert Henry, a probationer, 
who had been licensed in June, is sent to preach here in 
October. In January, 1674, they presented him with a call ; 
but at the same meeting the people of Glasslough, who had 
previously heard him, requested him to be sent back, which 
is refused; and he is enjoined to embrace the call from 
Carrickfergus. After second trials he is ordained in the 
neighbourhood of Ballyclare, at the house of Mr. John 
Crawford, on the 22nd of April, 1674. Mr. Thomas Hall, of 
Larne, preached on the occasion, from Matt, ii., 5, 6. The 
High Church party now rode rough-shod over the Presby- 
terians, maintaining that they violated the laws of the land 
by presuming to ordain ministers, and hence this ordination 
took place in a private dwelling many miles from Carrick- 
fergus. In August, 1688, Mr. Henry had a call from Derry, 
presented by Mr. William Lennox and Mr. Robert Harvey, 
two gentlemen whose names soon aftei'wards acquired 
celebrity in connection with the siege of the maiden city. 
The call was further prosecuted in September, by Mr. Frederic 
Cunningham and Mr. Henry Long, from Derry, and opposed 
by Mr. John M'Gee, Mr. James M'^Cullough, Mr. John Brown, 
and Mr. David Hood, from Carrickfergus. The result was 
that Mr. Henry was appointed to continue here. At the same 
meeting he had a call from Ayr, but the Presbytexy would 

* Belfast was then a small town ; but it was early made a borough, 
and was represented in the Irish Parliament. 

P 



82 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 

not entertain it. In Februaiy, 1689, Mr. Henry retired to 
Scotland, as Carrickfergus was in the hands of the partisans 
of King James, and the town suffered much during the 
Revolution. Mr. Heniy returned to his congregation in 
November, but was again in Scotland during January and 
February, 1690. In March, 1691, Mr. William M'Cracken 
appeared as commissioner from Glenluce, in Galloway, seek- 
ing his removal there, but the Presbytery would not consent. 
The Synod, in September, 1691, sent him to supply the Capel 
Street congregation, in Dublin, for six weeks. In April, 1692, 
two calls were addressed to him, one from G-lenluce, presented 
by Sir Charles Hay, and the other from Capel Street. Mr. 
John Brown, at that time one of the Sheriffs of Carrickfergus, 
Mr. William Dawson, and others, apjjeared as commissioners 
from the congregation opposing his removal ; but the Synod 
decided that he should settle in Dublin. In 1693 the j^eople 
gave a call to Mr. Joshua Fisher, but the Synod removed him 
to Donaghmore, County of Donegal. The next minister after 
Mr. Henry was Mr. Archibald Ross, who had been licensed 
by the Presbytery of Irwin, and who was ordained here in 
1694. He is named as one of the trustees for the Regnmi 
Donnm in the patent dated September, 1699. He died in 
the beginning of the year 1700. The next minister was Mr. 
Patrick Adair, who was ordained here December 9th, 1702. 
He died June 12tli, 1717. This gentleman appears to have 
been related to the Adair family of Ballymena. His son, 
William Adair, Esq., acquired a considerable fortune, and 
died unmarried. By his last will he bequeathed =£2,000 
in consolidated three per cent, annuities, in trust to the 
Adair's of Ballymena, to go annually for the benefit of the 
poor freemen of Carrickfergus, and to be divided as the owner 
of the Ballymena estate for the time being may direct. Mr. 
Adair was succeeded by Mr. James Frazer, who was ordained 
here June 3rd, 1718. Even at this time the Presbyterians 
were considerably disturbed by the threats of the High 
Church party. They were particularly opjjosed in the license 
and ordination of ministers. In memoranda which he left 
behind him, Mr. Frazer relates that he was licensed to preach 
by the Presbytery of Armagh, in Lurgan, in March, 1710, 
between 11 and 12 o'clock at night, by Mr. Hutcheson, of 
Armagh ; and that he was ordained as minister of Carrick- 
fergus, in Captain John Davies' garden, by the Presbytery 
of Bc-ifcist. There was at this time an old meeting-house in 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 83 

Carrickfergus, but a new one was erected very soon after- 
wards. The following account exhibits the quarterly jDayments 
of Reijium Dommi received by Mr. Frazer the year after his 
ordination : — 

Jan. 6th, 1719, received my 1st quarter of "R.D"., £1 19 104 

Mar. 12, „ „ 2iid „ ,, 2 4 

June 11, ,, ,, ord ,, „ 2 7 

Sept. 10, ,, ,, 4th „ ,, 1 19 61 

Additional eodem die, 16 6'-^- 

£8 16 lOi 
Towards the close of Mr. Frazer's ministry, a committee of 
Presbytery appointed to compose certain differences existing 
in the congregation, reported that they " fully vindicated and 
acquitted Mr. Frazer of endeavouring to procure one seat 
more than another for Mr. Dalway," and for " receiving 
Mr. Dalway as a member of the congregation." Mr. Frazer 
died August, 1748, and was succeeded by Mr. David 
Fullarton, who, after a long vacancy, Avas ordained March 
11th, 1756. At his ordination he subscribed the following 
formula, — " I believe the "Westminster Confession of Faith 
contains a good system of the Christian doctrines, which 
I subscribe as the confession of my faith." In 1760, 
when Thurot appeared in Belfast Lough with three 
French frigates, Carrickfergus was taken, and Mr. Fullar- 
ton was sent to Belfast with a flag of truce and a letter 
to the Sovereign, or Mayor, in which the French Com- 
modore threatened to burn the town, if not immediately 
furnished with a supply of provisions. The ministry of Mr. 
Fullarton in Carrickfergus was uncomfortable ; he was 
charged with indiscretion; and he at length resigned the 
congregation in 1767, and conformed to the Established 
Church. He was succeeded by Mr. William Blakely, who 
was ordained December 12th, 1770. He resigned in 1779, 
and was suspended sine die. In 1770 a petition was presented 
to the corporation from the Masters and Wardens of the 
Trades, requiring a grant of an old house in North Street, 
for the use of the Presbyterian minister, and it was ordered 
that a deed for ever be made to Marriot Dalway, Esq. (who 
in 1761 was elected M.P. for Carrickfergus), in trust for said 
minister for the time being, and that twenty guineas be given 
to Mr. Dalway towards building the same. In March, 1783, 
Mr. John Savage was ordained to the pastoral charge. He 
died December 19th, 1822. The next minister was Mr. James 



84 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

Seaton Eeid, formerly minister of Donegore, and afterwards 
D.D. and Professor of Ecclesiastical History in the University 
of Glasgow. In Dr. Eeid's time the present church was 
erected. Having been appointed Professor of Ecclesiastical 
History in Belfast, he resigned this charge on the 6th of 
November, 1838, and was succeeded by the Rev. James White 
(son of the Rev. Patrick White, of Bailieborough), who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Templepatrick, on the 
31st December, 1838. Dr. Eeid died at Belmont, the seat of 
Lord Mackenzie, near Edinburgh, on the 26th of March, 
1851, aged 52. 

CASTLEBLAYNEY. 

The earliest notice "we have of this congregation is in 1718, 
when the people applied to the Synod of Ulster for the 
hearing of a licentiate. They stated that they were able to 
pay <£20 per annum stipend ; and that Mr. Arthur Maxwell* 
of Drumbeg, in County Down, promised them ^81 10s. a-year 
to assist them. At the same time Lord Blayney wrote to 
the Synod on their behalf, " setting forth his regard for the 
Protestant Dissenters in his country ; that they want a 
meeting-house ; that they were not able to build it ; and 
that he is willing to assist them." They soon after obtained 
as their minister Mr. Samuel Hemphill, who was ordained 
here on the 24th of December, 1718. In 1729 he had a call 
to the 2nd congregation of Antrim ; but the Synod continued 
him here. Lord Blayney wrote to the Synod praying Mr. 
Hemjihill to be settled here. He died in this charge on the 
28th of March, 1741. The next minister was Mr. James 
Gordon, who was ordained here on the 18th of January, 
1744. In 1750 he was translated from this to Eaphoe. He 
was succeeded by Mr. John Warnock, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Cootehill in October, 1756. He 
was succeeded by Mr. John Davis, who was ordained here 
on the 13th of December, 1774. Becoming infirm, Mr. 
James Harpur was ordained his assistant and successor on 
the nth of December, 1810. Mr. Davis died March 7th, 
1818, leaving neither widow nor family. Mr. Harpur died 
on the 11th of December, 1838, leaving both widow and 
family. The next minister was the Eev. Thomas Boyd, 

* This gentleman was a distinguished benefactor of the Irish 
Presbyterian Church. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 85 

formerly assistant minister of Magherally, who was installed 
here on the 21st of June, 1839. Mr. Boyd died on the ■26th 
of November, 1863 ; and on the 13th of May, 1864, Mr. 
Joseph M'Askie was installed in the pastoral charge. Mr. 
M'Askie resigned this charge on the 4th of October, 1881 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. Robert H. Smythe, who was 
installed here on the 27th of March, 1883. 



CASTLEDAWSON. 

The first minister of this congregation of whom we have 
any account was Mr. John Tomb, who was ordained here 
about the year 1696. Prior to this time Maghera and Castle- 
dawson were united. Mr. Tomb continued in this charge till 
his death in February, 1718. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh 
Wallace, who was installed here September 7, 1720. He had 
previously been minister of Loughgall, and the congregation 
of Castledawson now included Magherafelt. The latter place 
was erected into a separate congregation in 1738, and Mr. 
Wallace became the minister. Castledawson was thus left 
vacant, and it then obtained as minister Mr. Robert Henry, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Route, June 7, 
1743. He resigned this charge through age and infirmity 
October 28, 1798 ; and died November 1, 1802, leaving a family. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Solomon Brown,* brother to the Rev. 
John Brown, D.D., of Aghadoey, who was ordained on the 
1st Tuesday of December, 1802. On the 24th of Decembex*, 
1833, Mr. Brown resigned the charge through infirmity, and 
died November, 20, 1834. The next minister was Mr. James 
Glasgow, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Magherafelt, October 6, 1835. At the first meeting of the 
General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland 
Mr. Glasgow (now D.D.) was sent abroad as a missionary to 
India, and Castledawson became vacant. The next minister 
was Mr. John Radcliffe, who was ordained here on the 23rd 
of June, 1841. Mr. Radcliffe, having been appointed to a 
charge in the West Indies, resigned the congregation on the 
15th of August, 1848 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert 
Gamble, who was ordained on the 1st of August, 1849, by 
the Presbytery of Magherafelt. 

* Father of Dr. S. Browne, R.N., J.P., Belfast. 



86 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

CASTLEDEEG 1st. 

The congregation of 1st Derg, or Castlederg, now belong- 
ing to the Presbytery of Donegal, was established about the 
year 1700. In July, 1699, Mr, Holmes, of Urney, signified 
to the Presbytery that there was a considerable prospect of a 
congregation being formed here, provided a part of his con- 
gregation and of Mr. Haliday's, at Ardstraw, were joined to 
the existing nucleus. There is reason to believe that the first 
minister was Mr. John Dunlop, who was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Convoy, September 15th, 1710, and died, 
NovemlSer 29th, 1713. The next minister was Mr. Nehemiah 
Donaldson, ordained here, December 19th, 1716. Mr. 
Donaldson was the valued fi'iend and pastor of the celebrated 
Mr. David Cairns, of Knockmany, one of the heroes of the 
siege of Derry ; and Mr. Cairns, at his death, bequeathed to 
him a pledge of his affection.* Mr. Donaldson died, July 7th, 
1747, and was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Young, who was 
ordained here, June 8th, 1748. In 1750, Mr. Young was 
called to be colleague to Mr. M'Collum, of Capel Street, 
Dublin ; but expressing his sincere attachment to Derg, the 
Synod refused to require his removal. In 1772, it was re- 
ported to Synod that Hugh Edwards, Esq., had bequeathed 
to the congregation d£10 yearly, for ever, a sum which is, we 
believe, still regularly paid to the minister. Mr. Young died 
in this charge in 1789, leaving a family. He was succeeded 
by Mr. James Henderson, who was ordained here. May 27th, 
1791. Mr. Henderson was drowned, December 20th, 1818, 
leaving a widow and family ; and was succeeded by Mr. James 
Adams, ordained here, September 27th, 1820. Mr. Adams 
died in this charge. May 22nd, 1837. In November, 1827, 
the congregation of Killeter was disannexed from that of 
Derg. In Sejitember, 1837, Mr. John Crockett, formerly of 
Killeter, was installed as successor to Mr. Adams. Mr. 
Crockett becoming infirm applied for an assistant, and died 
on the 11th of February, 1875; and was succeeded by Mr. 
James M'Cay, who was ordained here on the 20th of May, 
1874. 

* Mr. Cairns, who was long M.P, for Derry, died in May, 1722. He 
was married to Margaret Edwards. In 1743, Matthew Edwards, of the 
same family, was married to the daughter of Nehemiah Donaldson. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 87 

CASTLEREAGH. 

This congregation was originally a joint chai'ge, there 
being two congregations — one at Knock and another at 
Bredfi . The first minister of whom we have any account was 
Mr. Hugh Wilson, who, in 1661, was deposed by Bishop 
Taylor. Mr. Wilson continued to preach to his people as 
often as he had opportunity till 1690, when he removed to 
Scotland, and settled in the Presbytery of Wigton. His 
successor was Mr. James Montgomery. He died October 
26th, 1710. He was succeeded by Mr. Francis Montgomery, 
who was ordainedhere April 27th, 1715. In 1741 he iDecamo 
infirm, and Mr. Samuel Alexander was ordained his assistant 
and successor by the Presbytery of Bangor, January 26th, 
1742. Mr. Montgomery died in 1761. Mr. Alexander 
becoming infirm, Mr. Alexander Henry was ordained his 
assistant and successor, December 13th, 1774. Mr. Alexander 
died November 18th, L787. Mr. Henry died July 14th, 1806. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Chai-les Grey, who was ordained 
March 3rd, 1807. On the 16th of March, 1814, he resigned 
this charge, and on the same day was suspended. He died 
February 14th, 1816. The next minister was Mr. Henry 
Haslett, who was ordained here September 24th, 1816. Mr. 
Haslett having retired from the active duties of the ministry, 
Dr. John James Given was installed as his assistant and 
successor, February 7th, 1854. Dr. Given, on his appoint- 
ment to a professorship in Magee College, resigned this 
charge in June, 1870; aad was succeeded by Mr. William 
Rogers, who was ordained hei'e on the 3rd of August, 1871. 
Mr. Rogers (now LL.D.)* resigned the charge of this con- 
gregation in 1876 on his removal to Whiteabbey ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. John B. Thomson, who was ordained here 
on the 13th of March, 1877. 

CAVAN. 

This congregation was erected in November, 1833. The 
first minister was Mr. James M'Clatchy, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Monaghan on the 3rd of April, 
1834. He died of consumption on the 21st of November, 

* Tlie great-grandfather of Dr. Rogers, who was minister of the 
Secession church of Cahaus, was the first Professor of Divinity in 
Ireland appointed by the Secession Church. 



88 HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

1836, and was succeeded by Mr. Robert Fleming— who had 
been minister of the Seceding congregation at Bellaghy, in 
County Derry — but who had joined the Belfast Presbytery 
in 1836. He was installed here on the 5th of March, 1837. 
Mr. Fleming died on the 26th of March, 185] ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. James Carson, who was ordained here on 
the 30th of June, 1851. On the 30th of July, 1879, Mr. 
Carson retired from the active duties of the ministry, and 
was succeeded by Mr. John Howard Murphy,* who was 
ordained here on the 27th of November of the same year. 
Mr. Carson died on the 21st of December, 1880. 

CAVANALECK. 

This congregation was at first called Aghalurcher or Five- 
mile-town. The first minister of whom we have any account 
is Mr. Josias Cornwall, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Monaghan, May 21st, 1704. He was deposed 
for gross misconduct on his own confession, December 26th, 
1728. In 1730 he came before the Synod, " confessed his 
sin, and made such professions of his repentance as were 
very satisfactory to the Synod." He was restored to the 
ministry by the Presbytery of Monaghan, October 4th, 1738, 
but never held a charge. The next minister was Mr. John 
Gibson, who was ordained here February 23rd, 1732. He 
removed to Keady in January, 1738. The next notice we 
have of this congregation is in the account of the ordination 
of Mr. Thomas Boyle, who was settled here May 21st, 1745. 
He died October 25th, 1780, leaving a family. He was 
succeeded by Mr. W. Johnson, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Clogher, December 4th, 1781. Becoming 
infirm, the Rev. James Philijis was ordained his assistant 
and successor May 19th, 1812. Mr. Johnson was afterwards 
suspended and finally degraded. Mr. Philips becoming 
infirm, Mr. John M' Michael was ordained his assistant and 
successor on the 29th of June, 1858. Mr. M'Michael having 
resigned the charge and emigrated to the colonies, Mr. David 
Greer was installed in this charge on the 29th of September, 
1864. Mr. Philips died on the 21st of April, 1867. Mr. 
Greer died on the 17th of May, 1884, and was succeeded by 
Mr. James Melville Irwin, who was ordained here on the 
14th of October of the same year, 

* Son of Professor J. G. Murphy, D.D., LL.D., of Assembly's 
College, Belfast. 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 89 

CLARE. 

The first minister here of whom we liave auy account was 
Mr. John Macbride. He was here in 1679. In the year 1694 
he was removed to Belfast, where he continued till his death. 
In 1697 Moses Cherry was ordained at Clare as his successor. 
He died in 1727. He was succeeded by his son, George 
Cherry, who had been ordained here as his father's assistant 
and successor on the 14th of December, 1725. Mr. Cherry 
died in this charge on the 17th of May, 1765, leaving a 
widow and children. He was succeeded by Mr. Samuel 
Livingston, who was ordained here on the 20th of August, 
1765. He died minister of this congregation on the 26th of 
February, 1802, leaving a widow and family. After much 
disputing, Mr. Robert Adams was ordained here on the 22nd 
of June, 1807. In 1812 he was admonished and suspended 
one Lord's Day for neglect of his pastoral duty in not visit- 
ing the sick, and for transgressing the regulations of Synod 
respecting the celebration of marriage. This was the origin 
of much trouble in the congregation, as the people were very 
unwilling that Mr. Adams should return to the performance 
of pastoral duties among them. In 1816 it was at length 
agreed that the congregation should have liberty to choose a 
successor to Mr. Adams, on the understanding that Mr. Adams 
was topay,out of the "B.D.",£dO per annum to such successor. 
Accordingly Mr. James Gardner was ordained here on the 
28th of March, 1817. On the 9th June, 1824, he was set aside 
from the ministry for immorality. The next minister was 
Mr. John Bell, who was ordained here on the 21st December, 
1824. Mr. Adams died about 1840. In 1876, in consequence 
of the increasing infirmity of Mr. Bell, leave was granted to 
his congregation to elect an assistant and successor, and on 
the 14th of November, 1877, Mr. David Wilson was ordained 
to the pastoral charge. Mr. Wilson, on his removal to 
Mourne, resigned this charge on the 5th of October, 1881 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. Robert J. Whan, who was ordained 
here on the 28th of March, 1882. 

CLOGHER OR CARNTALL. 

This congregation was originally knoAvn by the name of 
Clogher, and the earliest notice we have of it is in connection 
with an unsuccessful application of the people to the Synod 



90 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

of Ulster in September, 1691, for the continuance with them 
of Mr. Neill Gray, who was then about to be settled at 
Taughboyne or St. Johnstone. They promised to the Synod 
to make good to him ^30 per annum. Their commissioners 
were Messrs. James Kennedy, William Cairns and William 
Ury. Mr. Neill G-ray had been preaching to them for some 
time. He was succeeded by Mr. William Cornwall, who was 
ordained here about 1695. In 1717 he expressed his desire 
to demit the charge of the congregation, on account of the 
distance of his dwelling-house from the meeting-house, of 
his bodily indisposition, and of the great arrears due by the 
people. In 1718 he resigned this charge, purposing to go to 
America. He returned from New England, not long after 
his arrival there, and was settled at Taughboyne in 1722, 
The next minister was Mr. John Carlisle, who was ordained 
here on the 10th of January, 1722. He died in this charge 
May 22nd, 1 748. He was succeeded by Mr. William M'Neill, 
who was ordained here May 22nd, 1754, by the Presbytery 
of Tyrone. In 1770 he was suspended, sine die, and the 
Synod in 1771 oi'dered that unless he satisfied the Presby- 
tery of Tyrone as to the disposal of ^20 bequeathed to the 
minister of Carntall, and of <£20 bequeathed to the poor of 
said parish, he should be deposed. The next minister was 
Mr. Andrew Millar, who Avas ordained here June 15th, 1773. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. John Hanna was ordained his assistant 
and successor November 5th, 1829. Mr. Millar died on the 
11th of February, 1831. Mr. Hanna died on the 7th of 
December, 1857. He was succeeded by Mr. James G. Robb, 
who was ordained here on the 24th of June, 1858. Mr. 
Robb (afterwards D.D.) resigned this charge on the 16th of 
March, 1874, on his removal to Toronto; and was succeeded 
by Mr. William H. Bailey, who was ordained here on the 
18th of August, 1874. 

CLONMEL. 

In June, 1673, a letter from Colonel Sankey was laid before 
the Presbytery of Lagan, together with a call from certain 
people of Clonmel, to Mr. William Cock. He was accordingly 
ordained as their minister on the 25th of November, 1673. 
He was here in 1688. The congregation subsequently joined 
the Presbytery of Munster, and among its ministers was the 
Eev. William Campbell, D.D., so famous for his controversy 



HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 91 

with Dr. Woodward, Bishop of Cloyne. Dr. Campbell was 
a New Light minister, and notwithstanding his learning and 
ability, the congregation did not flourish under him. His 
successors were at least equally lax in their theology. In 
1832 several families here applied to the Synod of Ulster foi- 
preaching, and soon afterwards a congregation was erected in 
the place. Their first elected minister was the Rev. M. 
Mitchell, formerly minister of the seceding congregation of 
Moneymore, but he died before his installation. The next 
minister elected was Mr. John Dill, who was ordained here 
on the 25th of May, 1836. Mr. Dill died on the 5th of 
August, 1868 ; and on the 30th of December of the same 
year Mr. H. H. Beattie (now LL.D.) was ordained as minister. 
On the 2nd of Api*il, 1878, Dr. Beattie, having received an 
appointment as chaplain to the Forces, resigned this charge. 
On the 27th of June, 1878, the Rev. James Wilson was 
installed in the congregation of Clonmel as a joint-charge 
with Fethard. 



CLONTIBRET 1st. 

This congregation was erected in 1725. Their commis- 
sioner to the Synod in that year was George Meek. The 
first minister was Mr. William Sloan, who was ordained here 
by the Presbytery of Monaghan on the 3rd of April, 1728. 
He died in this charge on the 12th of June, 1732. He was 
succeeded by Mr. James Clarke, who was ordained here on 
the 26th May, 1736. He died in November, 1756. He was 
succeeded by Mr. James Kinnear, who was ordained here on 
the 25th of June, 1759. He died in this charge on the 21st 
of March, 1777. His successor was Mr. William M'Ferson,. 
who was ordained by the Presbytery of Dromore on the 6th 
of May, 1778. He resigned the charge of the congregation 
on the 24th of August, 1789; and was succeeded by Mr. 
James Goudy, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Monaghan on the 25th of March, 1790. JSe died on the 10th 
of September, 1826, leaving a widow and family. The next 
minister was Mr. Alexander Patterson, jun., son of the Rev. 
Alexander Patterson, of Magherally, who was ordained here 
by the Presbytery of Monaghan on the 3rd of July, 1827. 
On the 2nd of March, 1830, Mr. Patterson resigned this 
charge and removed to Ballymena. He was succeeded by 
Mr. John Arnold, who was ordained here on the 30th of 



92 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS, 

September, 1830. On July 3rd, 1835, Mr. Arnold resigned 
the charge and removed to Omagh. The next minister was 
Mr. James Buchanan Hamilton, a licentiate of the Church 
of Scotland, who was ordained here on the 1st of September, 
1836. On the 3rd of October, 1843, Mr. Hamilton resigned 
the pastoral charge, having received a presentation to a 
parish in connection with the Established Church of Scot- 
land ; and on the 24th of June, 1846, Mr. Andrew Molyneux 
was ordained as pastor. 

CLOUGH, Co. Antrim. 

This congregation was early i)lauted. The first minister 
was Mr. Andrew Rowan, who was originally from the neigh- 
bourhood of Glasgow, and who was ordained here about 1650. 
At the Restoration he was one of the few who conformed, 
and he was consequently admitted rector of Dunaghy, or 
Clough, by the Bishop of Down and Connor, on the 13th of 
September, 1661. This seems to have impeded the settle- 
ment of a Presbyterian minister here for some time. The 
next minister was Mr. Peter Orr, who was ordained to this 
charge in January, 1673. At the Revolution he fled to 
Scotland, but returned shortly afterwards, and remained here 
till his death, on the 27th of December, 1706. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Alexander Orr (probably his son), who was 
ordained here on the 20th December, 1709. His pastorate 
was short, as he died on the 1st of May, 1713. His successor 
was Mr. Thomas Cobham, Avho was ordained on the 12th of 
March, 1718. He died in this charge on the 3rd of February, 
1732. He was succeeded by Mr. James M'Curdy, who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Coleraine on the 12th of 
August, 1735. He died in this charge on the 8th of January, 
1758 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Joseph Douglass, who was 
ordained here on the 3rd of June, 1760. Mr. Douglass is 
said to have been a man of commanding presence ; he was a 
ciiptain of the Volunteers ; and he sometimes preached in his 
military dress. His daughter Margaret — who is said to have 
been extremely beautiful — was married to Richard Bateson, 
Esq., of Londonderry, grandfather of Sir Robert Bateson, 
Bart., of Castruse, County of Donegal. Mr. Douglass 
resigned the charge of the congregation in consequence of 
age and infirmity on the 1st of November, 1795. The next 
minister was Mr. Thomas Kinnear, who was ordained here 



HISTORY OF CONGEECtATIONS. 93 

on the 23rd of June, 1801. He resigned the charge in 
December, 1804. Mr. Douglass died on the 18th of November, 
1805. The next minister was Mr. John Hall, who was 
ordained here on the 17tli of June, 1806. Becoming infirm, 
Mr. Hall retired from the discharge of the pastoral diities, 
and on the 14th of March, 1865,* Mr. James Reutoul was 
ordained his assistant and successor. Mr. Hall died on the 
11th of January, 1866. Mr. Rentoul resigned this charge 
on the 14th of May, 1878, on his removal to 2nd Dromore ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. S. E. Brown, formerly of Athlone, 
who was installed here on the 19th of November, 1878. 

CLOrGH, Co. Down. 

The earliest notice of this congregation in the Synodical 
records is under the name of Drtimca. Its first minister was 
Thomas Maxwell, who was here in 1687, and probably for 
some time before. He died in this charge on the 14th of 
July, 1705. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Eamsay, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Down on the 7th of 
May, 1707, and who died on the i2th of November, 1720. 
The next minister was Mr. Hugh Williamson, who was 
ordained here by the same Presbytery on the 31st of Julv, 
1722. He died in this charge March 3rd, 1748. He was 
succeeded by Mr. John Williamson (probably his son), who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Killileagh on the 4th 
of February, 1752, and who was a subscriber to the West- 
minster Confession of Faith. He was present at the Synod 
of 1766, but he is not afterwards noticed. The next minister 
was Mr. Robert Porter, who was ordained here on the 16th 
of June, 1773. Becoming infirm, Mr. William Campbell was 
ordained his assistant and successor on the 22nd September, 
1813. Mr. Porter died on the 22nd of March, 1815. Mr. 
Campbell died on the 2nd of April, 1829. A dispute having 
occurred respecting the choice of a successor, and the Synod 
of Ulster having, in 1829, put the congregation under the 
care of a committee, a part of it seceded to the Presbytery 
of Antrim in July, 1829. The next minister was Mr. Francis 
Dill, formerly of Eay, County Donegal, who was installed 
here by the committee of Synod on the 3rd of November, 
1829. The congregation was annexed by the Synod in 1830 

* It thus appears that the ministrj- of Mr. Hall is one of the longest 
on record. 



:94 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 

to the Presbytery of Dromore. About this time they com- 
menced a suit for the recovery of the meeting-liouse, mean- 
■while occupied by the Arian party, and a decision was given 
in their favour by the Barons of the Exchequer in May, 1836. 
Mr. Dill becoming infirm, Mr. Edward Stuart was ordained 
his successor on the 3rd of February, 1842. Mr. Dill died 
•on the 29th of January, 1848. Mr. Stuart having become 
infirm, Mr. Eobert Scott was ordained as his assistant and 
successor on the 4th of July, 1883. 

CLOrGHERNEY. 

This congregation was erected off the 1st congregation of 
Omagh in 1720, and, with Pettigo, was under the ministry of 
Mr. Joseph Hemphill from 1721 till his death in 1747. It 
then became a separate charge under the name of Termont, 
and its first minister was Mr. James Scott, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Strabane on the 16th of April, 
1752. He was annexed to Clogher Presbytery in 1777, and 
was killed on the 2nd of January, 1780, leaving a widow. 
Mr. James Ker was ordained his successor by the Presbytery 
of Clogher on the 13th of February, 1781. He died in this 
charge on the 5th of June, 1823, leaving neither wife nor 
family, and was succeeded by Mr. Archibald Armstrong, who 
was ordained here on the 2nd of September, 1823. Mr. 
Armstrong died in September, 1849. He was succeeded by 
Mr. Joseph M'Caskie, who was ordained here on the 10th of 
September, 1850. On the 9th of April, 1864, Mr. M'Caskie 
resigned the charge of this congregation, having accepted a 
call to 1st Castleblayney. He was succeeded by Mr. Samuel 
Cochrane, who was ordained to the pastoral charge on the 
27th of June, 1865. 

COAGH. 

The first notice we have of this congregation is in 1708, 
when the inhabitants about Coagh and Ballinderry com- 
plained to the Synod that the Presbytery of Tyrone had 
refused to erect them into a congregation, and join to them 
some from Moneymore and Ballyclug (now Brigh) congrega- 
tions. The Presbytery was rebuked for this oi>position ; and 
in 1710 the whole matter, after many disputes, was satis- 
factorily adjusted, and Mr. David Thomb was ordained here 
on the 17th of October, 1711. He died in this charge on the 



HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 95 

6tli of October, 1726. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugli 
Sharp, wlio was ordained here ou the 6th of Juue, 1732, after 
a vacancy of nearly six years. In 1751 the people applied to 
the Synod for supplies, Mr. Sharp having become infirm. 
He died on the 7th of February, 1753 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. John M'Clelland, who Avas ordained here on the 9th 
of September, 1755. Mr. M'Clelland died in this charge ou 
the 28th of August, 1798. The next minister was Mr. John 
Cowan, who was ordained here on the fi.rst Tuesday of May, 
1801. Becoming infirm, he resigned the pastoral charge in 
1835 ; and on the 5th of October of that year Mr. Edward 
M. Dill, M.D., was ordained his assistant and successor. Dr. 
Dill resigned this charge, and removed to Cork. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Eobert Holmes, who was ordained here on 
the 29th November, 1839. Mr. Cowan died on the 26th of 
July, 1841. Mr. Holmes died on the 18th of September, 
1881 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Alexander Coskery, who 
was ordained here on the 2nd of March, 1882. 

COLERAINE, 1st. 

The name of the first pastor of this congregation is un- 
known. On Easter Sunday, 1644, the Covenant was 
administered in the town by Messrs. Weir and Adair, ministers 
from Scotland, to the garrison and inhabitants, and was 
taken by Mr. Vesey, the minister. In 1668 and 1669, the 
congregation was vacant. Mr. Thomas Wylie, a Scotch 
minister, whose relatives lived in Coleraine, came over and 
supplied the i)lace for three years, from 1670 to 1673, but 
declined settling in the charge. On his return to Scotland 
the people sent with him a blank call, dated June 25th, 1673, 
to be presented to such a person as he would recommend. 
He sent them over Mr. William Weir, who had been the 
minister of West Calder, in Scotland, and who had been 
brought prisoner to Edinburgh, on the olst of July, 1673, for 
maintaining his Presbyterian principles. Mr. Weir continued 
in Coleraine from 1674 to 1687, when he returned to Scotland, 
where he died in the ministry at Linlithgow in 1695. In 
May, 1688, the congregation of Coleraine gave a call to Mr. 
Abernethy, of Money more, but partly in consequence of the 
unsettled state of the country, this minister did not remove 
there till 1691. The peojjle promised him fuel, a dwelling- 
house, and c£40 per annum stipend. Mr. Abernethy died in 



96 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

tliis charge November 14th, 1703. In 1705 the congregation 
wished to call Mr. Robert G-emmill from Scotland, but the 
Synod, not being satisfied with his testimonials, could not 
permit them. This created great and long-continued dissatis- 
faction in the congregation. The people at length agreed 
upon a call to Mr. Robert Higinbotham, who was ordained 
here, December 26th, 1710. In 1714 Mr. Higinbotham was 
rebuked before the Synod for refusing to marry Mrs. Martha 
Woods, of Four-loan-ends, in Belfast parish, and was allowed 
three months for fulfilling that contract, otherwise the 
Presbytery of Route were instructed to depose him. At the 
time of the disputes respecting subscription, he at first took 
tlie side of the non-subscribers, when a new erection was 
sanctioned in Coleraine, and he, in consequence, withdrew 
from the Synod; but in the year 1727 he returned, and pro- 
fessed his adherence to subscription and the Westminster 
Confession of Faith. He was now joined to the Presbytery 
of Derry, but the Sessions of Ballykelly and Boveva suppli- 
cated that he should be removed to another Presbytery, and 
he was joined to that of Templepatrick. He was afterwards 
connected with the Presbytery of Ballymena when it was 
formed in 1745. In 1761 he and his congregation supplicated 
to be put again into the Presbytery of Derry, and the Synod 
acceded to the application. Mr. Higinbotham becoming 
infirm, Mr. Arthur Kyle was ordained as his assistant 
September 23rd, 1761. Mr. Higinbotham died in 1770. On 
the 4th of June, 1799, Mr. Matthew Culbert was ordained as 
assistant to Mr. Kyle, who died in August, 1808. Mr. Culbert 
becoming blind, Mr. Andrew M'Caldin, formerly minister at 
Stratford, was installed here on the 20th of March, 1811. 
Mr. Culbert died January 30th, 1819. Mr. M'Caldin died on 
the 10th of July, 1844, and on the 6th of May, 1845, Mr. 
William Richey was ordained to the pastoral charge. It thus 
appears that Mr. Richey was the sixth minister of Coleraine 
since the time of the Revolution, and that the pastorate of 
Mr. Higinbotham extended over a period of about sixty years. 
Mr. Richey obtained as his assistant Mr. Robert W. Fleming, 
who was installed here on the 20th of November, 1860. Mr. 
Richey died on the 14th of October, 1867. Mr. Fleming re- 
tii'ed from the active duties of the ministry some time 
pi'eviously, and died on the 23rd of July, 1882. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Francis Stuart Gardiner, who was ordained 
here on the 10th of May, ] 882. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 97 

COLEEAINE 2nd. 

This congregation was erected in 1727, in consequence of 
the part taken by Mr. Higinbotham, the minister of the 
place, in the debates respecting subscription to the West- 
minster Confession of Faith. In December, 1727, Messrs. 
Hugh Bankhead, Robert Dunlop, and Isaac Tod appeared as 
commissioners at the Synod from this new erection. Their 
first minister was Mr. Charles Lynd, formerly minister of 
Fannet, who was installed here by the Presbytery of Route 
in the beginning of the year 1728. He died in this charge 
on the 21st of December, 1751. He was succeeded by Mr. 
John Simpson, who was ordained here on the 17th of 
October, 1753. He died in this charge on the 4th of March, 
1795. The next minister was Mr. John Glasgow, who was 
ordained here on the 8th of March, 1796. He died on the 
13th of July, 1801, and was succeeded by Mr. John White- 
side, who was ordained here on the last Tuesday of July, 
1802. About the year 1840 a charge was brought against 
Mr. Whiteside, connected with the making of the will of Mr. 
Daniel Fulton, and a painful investigation followed. The 
result was that Mr. Whiteside retired from the discharge of 
the pastoral duties, and on the 10th of June, 1842, the Rev. 
Robert Knox was installed as his assistant and successor. 
Mr. Whiteside died on the 14th of April, 1843. Mr. Knox 
(afterwards Dr. Knox of Belfast), resigned the pastoral 
charge on the 27th of March, 1843 ; and on the 8th of 
August of the same year the Rev. Hugh Porter, formerly 
minister of 2nd Dunboe, was installed as the pastor of this 
congregation. Mr. Poi-ter died on the 9th of June, 1847 ; 
and was succeeded by the Rev. James Alfred Canning, who 
had formerly been minister of Mourne, and who was installed 
here on the 11th of April, 1848. Mr. Canning died on the 
9th of June, 1864 ; and on the 15th of March, 1865, the 
Rev. Robert Wallace was installed as the minister of this 
congregation. 

COMBER 1st. 

The first minister here was the Rev. James Gordon, who 
was ordained by the Presbytery of Down, about the year 
1645. Mr. Gordon was deposed for nonconformity, in 1661, 
but afterwards conformed. He was succeeded by the Rev. 



98 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

John Hamilton, who retired to Scotland, at the time of the 
troubles in 1689. Mr. Hamilton was subsequently appointed 
one of the ministers of Edinburgh. In 1687, and during the 
ministry of Mr. Hamilton, Mr. John Binning opened a 
philosophy school at Comber, where some candidates for the 
ministry received part of their education ; but the scheme 
was interrupted by the revolution, and never resumed. Mr. 
Hamilton was succeeded by the Eev. Thomas Orr, who was 
ordained by the Presbytery of Down, in the year 1695. Mr. 
Orr continued in this charge till his death, in 1722. He was 
succeeded by the Eev. John Orr, probably his son, who was 
ordained here, January 6th, 1724. He joined the non- 
subscribing Presbytery of Antrim, and the meeting-house 
having been seized by those adhering to the Synod, in July, 
1 726, the congregation continuing to worship therein, 
obtained, as their minister, the Eev. Robert Cunningham, 
who was ordained here, by the Presbytery of Bangor, October 
22nd, 1728. Becoming infirm, he demitted the charge in 
1722, and died in February, 1776. He was succeeded by the 
Eev. William Henry, who had formerly been minister of the 
second congregation of Dromore. Mr. Henry was father of 
the Eev. Thomas Henry, minister of Eandalstown, and 
grandfather of the late Eev. P. S. Henry, D.D., President of 
Queen's College, Belfast. Mr. Henry died June 19th, 1789, 
and was succeeded by the Eev. John M'Cance, who was 
ordained here, June 15th, 1790. Mr. M'Cance, becoming in- 
firm, demitted the charge in 1837, and the Eev. Isaac Nelson * 
was ordained as his assistant, on the 27th August, 1838. In 
March, 1842, Mr. Nelson removed to Belfast, and on the 9th 
of May, 1843, the Eev. J. M. Killen (afterwards D.D.) was 
ordained to the pastoral charge. Mr. M'Cance died on the 
4th of November, 1843. One of the Colville family granted 
for ever, at a small rent, to the congregation of Comber, the 
plot of ground on which the meeting-house and manse now 
stand. The grant was made before the time of the revolution. 
About half a century afterwards, the Colville property was 
purchased by the ancestor of the present Lord Londonderry. 
Dr. Killen died on the 3rd of September, 1879, and was 
succeeded by Mr. John M'Keown, who was ordained here on 
the 23rd of March, 1880. Mr. M'Keown has recently 
removed to Birmingham. 
* Late M.P. for Mayo. 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS, 99 

COMBER 2nd. 

This congregation was erected in 1838, and its first 
minister was Mr. John Eogers, who was ordained here on 
the 27th of March, 1839. In 1869 Mr. (now Dr.) Eogers 
was elected Professor of Sacred Ehetoric in Assembly's 
College, Belfast. He was succeeded by the Eev. James 
Niblock, who was installed here on the 17th of Jime, 1873. 
Mr. Niblock, having accepted a call from a congregation in 
the Established Church of Scotland, resigned the charge in 
the summer of 1877, and was succeeded by Mr. David A. 
Taylor, who was ordained here on the 4th of December, 1877. 

CONLIG. 

The congregation of 1st Bangor has been one of the most 
prolific in the General Assembly. Within the memory of 
many still living, it has given birth to no less than five other 
congregations, viz., Conlig, Bally gilbert. Bally grainey, Groom- 
sport, and 2nd Bangor. The late John Sinclair, Esq., of 
Belfast, father-in-law of the Eev.W. Fleming Stevenson, D.D., 
of Eathgar, was mainly instrumental in the establishment of 
the congregation of Conlig. Mr. Sinclair erected entirely at 
his own exjiense the handsome church in which the congrega- 
tion now meets for worship. The district was then much 
more populous than it is at j^resent, as the lead mines in the 
neighbourhood gave much employment. The first minister 
was Mr. Samuel Hamilton, who was ordaiaed here on the 
24th of February, 1846. Mr. Hamilton removed to 1st 
Saintfield in February, 1854, and was succeeded by Mr. S. J. 
Hanson, who was ordained here on the 22nd of August, 1854. 
Mr. Hanson removed to Kingstown in January, 1860, and was 
succeeded by Mr. William Craig, who was ordained here on 
the 4th of September, 1860. Mr. Craig died in 1872, and was 
succeeded by Mr. David Gordon, who was ordained here on 
the 7th of January, 1873. Mr. Gordon on his removal to 
New Zealand, resigned this charge on the 14th of Febi'uary, 
1884 ; and was succeeded here by Mr. Hugh Porter, who was 
ordained here on the 8th of October, 1884. 

CONNOE. 

The first minister of this congregation was Mr. Eobert 



100 HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

Dewart, who was put on trial, with a view of his settlement 
here, in March, 1658, and ordained soon after. In 1661, 
after the Restoration, he was deposed by Bishop Taylor, and 
thus his ministry here terminated. Mr. Thomas Gowan, 
formerly minister of Glasslough, supplied the congregation, 
without being fixed in the charge, from 1667 to 1671. On 
March 27th, 1672, Mr. David Cunningham was ordained 
minister. Having arrived from Scotland the year preceding, 
he was entered on trials by the Presbytery in August, 1671, 
and licensed in October. Such was the intolerance of the 
period that the ministers dare not venture on a public 
ordination at Connor. He was, in consequence, ordained 
privately at Caimcastle, Mr. Patrick Adair presiding. The 
Presbytery entered upon their records a declaration to the 
effect that " it was not convenient for him to preach at 
Connor for some time in their jjresent circumstances." Mr. 
Cunningham accordingly went to Scotland, and returned in 
July, when the elders, in the presence of the Presbytery, and 
in the name of the congregation, received him as their 
minister. In February, 1674, Mr. John Blacklow appeared 
as the commissioner of the congregation before the Presby- 
tery, and stated that " their kindness and dutifulness to 
their minister was considerable, tho' their quota came not 
altogether up to their expectation." In 1688, James Brown, 
on behalf of the congregation, stated to the Pi'esbytery that 
they " would bestir themselves to get ijp arrears due to Mr. 
Cunningham, when victual came into their hands." About 
this time Mr. Cunningham, in consequence of declining 
health, expressed a wish to return to his native air in Scot- 
land. The Presbytery gave him permission to do so ; but he 
did not leave this country until March, 1689, when the 
troubles forced him to fly. In April, 1691, he again 
returned ; and in June following the commissioner of the 
congregation, James Brown, promised that he should receive 
d£30 in hand, and have security for ^624, with from eight to 
twelve bolls of corn yearly. They also promised to repair 
his house. Mr. Cunningham died May 21st, 1697. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Robert Murdoch, who was ordained 
December 6th, 1699. His ministry was short, as he died in 
June, 1702. The next minister was Mr. Charles Masterton, 
who appeared before the Synod in 1703, with his license from 
the Presbytery of Linlithgow, and who was ordained May 
17th, 1704. Mr. Masterton was one of the most distinguished 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 101 

ministers of the Synod, and a staunch advocate of orthodoxy — 
then beginning to be attacked. In the month of February, 
1723, he was removed to the congregation of Rosemary 
Street, Belfast. He was succeeded by Mr. Robert M' Master, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Antrim, March 
18th, 1724. In 1729 Mr. M'Master received a call from the 
congregation of Usher's Quay, Dublin. The congregation of 
Connor opposed his removal, and sent Messrs. James Dickie, 
William Harpur, and Samuel Blakely as their commissioners 
to the Synod, to j^rotest against it ; but the Synod deemed it 
expedient to permit him to go to Dublin. The congregation 
now remained a considerable time vacant ; but at length, in 
August, 1733, Mr. Thomas Fowler was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Templepatrick. His ministry was brief, as he 
died in June, 1736. The next minister, Mr. James Cochrane, 
was ordained by the Presbytery of Route, February 14th, 
1738. He died December 19th, 1770, leaving a widow and 
family ; and was succeeded by Mr. James Brown, who was 
ordained here February 27th, 1775. He demitted his charge 
here August 1st, 1788. The next minister was Mr. Henry 
Henry, who had previously been settled at Carvagh, and who 
was installed here December 9th, 1788. Becoming infirm, 
Mr. David Hamilton was ordained his assistant September 
29th, 1829. Mr. Hamilton resigned this charge, and removed 
to York Street congregation, Belfast, in January, 1840. He 
was succeeded by Mr. John Hamilton Moore, who was 
ordained here 6th July, 1840. Mr. Henry died the November 
following. Mr. Moore (now D.D.)* on his removal to Belfast, 
in 1862, resigned this charge ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
John S. M'Intosh, who was ordained here on the 5th of 
November, 1862. Mr. M'Intosh removed to Belfast, and 
resigned this charge in February, 1868 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Samuel Lyle, who was ordained here on the 29th of 
December, 1868. Mr. Lyle resigned the charge on the 1st 
of January, 1878, on his removal to Canada ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. John C. Moore, who was installed here on the 
28th of May of the same year. Mr. Moore resigned the 
charge on the 20th of August, 1883 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. William Colvin, LL.D., who was installed here oa the 
28th of February, 1884. 

* The great Ulster awakening of 1S59 commenced in Connor congre- 
gation under the ministry of Mr. Moore. 



102 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

CONVOY. 

The parish of Raphoe formerly embraced that of Convoy, 
and the meeting-house was erected on the Montgomery 
estate at Convoy, though the minister was known in church 
records as the minister of Raphoe. There were a consider- 
able number of Presbyterians in the district in the former 
half of the seventeenth century ; and in April, 1644, the 
covenant was administered in the town of Raphoe to the whole 
regiment of Sir Robert Stewart, and a great multitude from 
the surrounding parishes, by the Revs. Messrs. Weir and 
Adair, ministers from Scotland. Two curates, named Leslie 
and Watson, opposed them, but without success. Mr. John 
Crookshanks appears to have been the first minister. He 
was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Haliday, who was ordained 
here in 1664, and who removed to Omagh in 1677. In 
February, 1678, Mr. James Alexander was ordained the 
minister. In February, 1691, the congregation paid to him 
.£24 per annum of yearly salary, and twenty-four barrels of 
corn. He died November 17th, 1704. His successor was 
Mr. David Fairly. His son, Robert Fairly, was thrice mayor 
of the city of Derry, viz., in 1769, 1770, and 1782 ; and among 
his descendants are the Rev. William M'Clure, late senior 
minister of the first Presbyterian congregation of Derry, 
and his brother, Sir Thomas M'Clure, Bart., one of the 
original Trustees of the Belfast Presbyterian College. 
Mr. Fairly was licensed in 1708, and ordained to the 
charge of Convoy and Raphoe, March 21st, 1711. He 
was an excellent minister, and the traditions of the neigh- 
bourhood yet attest his integrity and piety. During 
his ministry the people of Raphoe were erected into a separate 
congregation; and in August, 1751, Mi\ James Cordon, who 
had formerly been settled in Castleblayney, was installed to 
the pastoral charge. Mr. Fairly died January 7th, 1776, at 
a very advanced age. Mr. James Taylor was ordained August 
28th, 1766, as his assistant and successor. The ministry of 
Mr. Taylor was also very extended ; but, becoming infirm, 
Mr. John Wray was ordained his assistant and successor, 
March 13th, 1822. Mr. Taylor died on the 15th February, 
1831, after a pastorate of 65 years. That of Mr. Fairly had 
been of the same length. Mr. Wray died March 6th, 1858. 
On the 23rd March, 1859, the Rev. Robert Beattie was 
ordained to the pastoral charge. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 103 



COOKSTOWN" 1st. 



The first minister was Mr. John MacKenzie. He was 
ordained here in the summer of 1673. He was in the City of 
Deny during its famous siege, and published an account of 
it, in which he shows that George Walker was very much of 
a sham, that he would more than once hnve capitulated if he had 
been peimitted, and that Colonel Adam Murray was the true 
hero who upheld the Protestant cause in its last refuge. The 
oongregation of Cookstown was originally called Derriloran. 
In September, 1691, the people applied to the Synod for Mr. 
MacKenzie's continuance with them, though they could not 
promise him more than d£15 per annum of stipend. The 
Synod recommended Moneymore, then vacant, to be joined 
with them. Whether this was done, does not clearly appear; 
but Mr. MacKenzie remained here till his death. He is said 
to have died in 1696, aged 49 years. The next minister was 
Mr. John M'Cleave, a licentiate of the Presbytery of Glasgow, 
who was ordained here on the 5th of February, 1701. He 
died in this charge on the 17th of June, 1749 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. James Hall, who had been licensed in England, 
and had been received by the Synod in 1749. He was 
ordained to this charge on the 5th of August, 1752. In 
January, 1763, he removed to Bangor, and was succeeded by 
Mr. George Murray, who was ordained on the 10th of 
December, 1765. He died in this charge on the 8th of 
September, 1795, leaving a family.* The next minister was 
Mr. John Davison, who was ordained here on the 26th of 
September, 1797. In 1835, Mr. Davison resigned the pastoral 
charge ; and, after many disputes, Mr. Alexander Fleming 
was ordained on the 28th of March, 1837, as assistant and 
successor to Mr. Davison. Meanwhile, a new congregation 
had been formed ; and the first minister, Mr. John Knox 
Leslie, who had been ordained in August, 1834, as a Home 
Missionary, under the Synod of Ulster, was installed in the 
new charge on the 11th of November, 1835. On the 15th of 
April, 1846, Mr. Fleming resigned the charge of 1st Cooks- 
town, having accepted a call to 1st Armagh ; and on the 11th 
of August, 1846, Mr. Hamilton Brown Wilson (now D.D.,) 
was ordained to the pastorate. Mr. Davison died on the 22nd 

* Formerly the Synod of Ulster very frequently held its annual 
meeting in Cookstown on account of its central position. The ministers 
and elders travelled to it mostly on horseback. 



104 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

of November, 1847. The meeting-liouse was first placed in 
the old town of Cookstown, where it continued till 1701, 
when it was pulled down hj the rector. Mrs. Margaret 
Stewart, of Killymoon, within three weeks, built a house, at 
her own expense, within the demesne, where the congregation 
worshipped till 1764. The present church is of recent 
erection. 



COOTEHILL. 

This congregation was erected off the congregation of Drum 
in 1718. Its first minister was Mr. Andrew Dean, who was 
ordained here on the 9th of October, 1721. He died in this 
charge in April, 1760, and was succeeded by Mr. Thomas 
Stewart, who was ordained here on the 22nd of April, 1766. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. John Johnston, was ordained here as 
his assistant and successor on the 2nd of February, 1808. 
Mr. (afterwards Dr.) Johnston, resigned this congregation on 
his removal to Tullylish a few years afterwards ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Robert Camj)bell, who was ordained here 
on the 8th of December, 1812. Mr. Stewart died on the 
10th of December, 1816, leaving a family. On the 26th of 
February, 1828, the connection between the congregation and 
Mr. Campbell was dissolved by order of Synod ; and on the 
same day Mr. James Bones was ordained to this charge. Mr. 
Campbell afterwards removed to America. Mr. Bones be- 
coming infirm, his congregation obtained leave to choose an 
assistant, and Mr. John R. M'Cleery was ordained to the 
pastoral charge on the 27th of September, 1870. Mr. Bones 
died on the 23rd of August, 1884. Mr. M'Cleery, on his 
removal to 1st Dromara, resigned this congregation on the 
23rd of August, 1880 ; and was succeeded by Mr. W. M. 
Henry, who was ordained here on the 7th of April, 1881. 

CORBOY AND TULLY. 

This congregation was originally known by the name of 
Longford. It was early planted, but its first minister, who 
was settled here about 1675, has not been ascertained. In 
1697 Mr. John Mairs, of Loughbrickland, is transported 
thither, when we find him complaining of the greatness of 
his charge, " being at least ten miles over, and the two 
places for preaching, in each other Sabbath, being five miles 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 105 

distant." In 1706 the Synod loosed his relation to this 
people on account of " his intolerable grievances, his wife 
losing her health, his own craziness, and the greatness of the 
charge." He removed to Newtownards, and died there. 
Their next minister was Mr. William Hare, ordained here 
November 13th, 1708. He resigned the charge, and was 
installed in Enniskillen in 1720. Their next minister was 
Mr. James Bond, who was ordained here by the Presbytery 
of Longford, February 20th, 1723. In 1731 he was called to 
Armagh, but the Synod would not permit him to be removed. 
He was the grandfather of the late Willoughby Bond, Esq., of 
Para, County Longford, an attached member of the Irish Pres- 
byterian Church, who in his time was perhaps the largest landed 
proprietor connected with her communion. Mr. James Bond 
died, aged seventy years, on the 11th September, 1762. He 
was succeeded by Mr. Joseph Martin, who was ordained here 
November 19th, 1765. He died in this charge June 19th, 
1767, aged thirty years. He was succeeded by Mr. William 
Fleming, formerly minister of Kingscourt, who was installed 
here in 1767, and died in this charge July 25th, 1784. He 
was succeeded by Mr. Robert Rodgers, formerly minister of 
Minterburn, who was installed March 9th, 1785. He died 
in March, 1791. The next minister was Mr. Joseph Osborne, 
who was ordained here March 16th, 1792. In May, 1799, 
he resigned the charge, and removed to Dungiven. The 
next minister was Mr. James Wilson, who was ordained 
March 5th, 1801. He died in September, 1816. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Thomas Kennedy, son of Mr. Kennedy, of 
Ballyjamesduff, who was ordained here May 17th, 1817. In 
1839 he was suspended by the Synod — when he joined the 
Remonstrants ; and was succeeded by Mr. John Henry, 
formerly minister of Drumbanagher, who was installed here 
by a committee of Synod, December 11th, 1839. On the 3rd 
of May, 1843, Mr. Henry resigned the charge and removed to 
Scotland. He was succeeded by Mr. John M'Cubbin, who 
was ordained on the 1st of November, 1843. Mr. M'Cubbin 
died in October, 1847, and the next minister was Mr. Robert 
W. Fleming, who was ordained here on the 17th of March, 
1848. Mr. Fleming having received a call to Coleraine, 
demitted the charge of this congregation on the 15th of 
October, 1860; and on the 31st of December, 1860, Mr. 
Alexander Ferguson was installed as pastor. Mr. Ferguson, 
having received a call from Creggs and Roscommon, resigned 



106 HISTOET OF CONGREGATIONS. 

this charge on the 15th of June, 1881 ; and was succeeded 
bj Mr. William Burke, who was installed here on the 1st of 
November of the same year. 

COEK— TRINITY CHUECH. 

A Presbyterian congregation existed in Cork at an early 
period. In an account of a fund established in 1710 for the 
support of the Presbyterian interest in the South of Ireland, 
and published in 1815, we have the names of no less than 
thirteen ministers who had preached there in succession. It 
is further stated that, in 1718, when a sum of =£800 per 
annum was added to the Regium Dommi, the one-half fell to 
Presbyterian ministers in the South of Ireland, among whom 
was the minister of Cork. But New Light at length made 
its appearance in what was called the Southern Association, 
or the Presbytery of Munster, and in consequence evangelical 
religion languished and died. Upwards of fifty years ago 
Orthodox Presbyterianism again asserted its position in the 
city ; a congregation was erected in it by the Synod of Ulster ; 
and on the 11th of September, 1834, the Eev. Henry 
Wallace (now Professor Wallace, of Belfast Presbyterian 
College), was installed as the minister. In consequence of 
failing health, Mr. Wallace resigned this charge in the 
beginning of April, 1837. He was succeeded by Mr. Edward 
M. Dill, M.D., formerly minister of Coagh, who was installed 
here od the 26th of August, 1838. On the 21st of September, 
1846, Dr. Dill resigned the charge, having accepted the office 
of General Itinerant Missionary Agent under the Directors 
of the Home Mission; and on the 13th of January, 1847, 
Mr. William Magill (now D.D.) was installed as minister. 
Dr. Magill retired from the active duties of the pastorate in 
1884 ; and Mr. Samuel Law Wilson, late of Dungannon, was 
installed as his successor in December, 1884. 

COELEA. 

In 1816 a memorial was presented to the Synod of Ulster 
in the name of upwards of one hundred families residing in 
Bally train and its vicinity, promising d£50 a year of Stipend 
to a minister, and praying to be erected into a congregation. 
The memorial was referred to the Presbytery of Monaghan. 
As they neglected to report to the next meeting of Synod, 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 107 

the business of the erection was meanwhile postponed. In 
the year 1823 the application was renewed and granted. The 
first minister was Mr. Matthew Adams, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Monaghan on the 11th of May, 
1824. The congregation obtained Eegium Donum in 1827. 
In 1833 Mr. Adams was disannexed from the congregation by 
a committee of Synod ; but, conducting himself improperly 
afterwards, he was eventually degi-aded. The next minister 
was Mr. John Parr, who was ordained here on the 24th of 
December, 1834. The congregation was, in 1835, entered on 
the minutes of the Synod as Corlea, instead of Ballytraiu. 
Mr. Parr died on the 14th of February, 1876, and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. James M'Kee,who was ordained to the pastoral 
charge on the 19th of July, 1876. Mr. M'Kee resigned the 
charge on the 5tb of February, 1878, having received a call 
from Lowtherstown ; and was succeeded by Mr. James Knox, 
who was ordained here on the 23rd of July, 1878. Mr. Knox 
resigned the charge on the 21st of December, 1881, having 
accepted a call from Alt ; and was succeeded by Mr. Alexander 
Milligan, formerly of Ballycolla, who was installed here on 
the 4th of April, 1882. 

CEEGGAN. 

The first notice we have of this congregation is the settle- 
ment of Mr. Alexander M'Comb, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Killileagh on the 18th of April, 1733. He 
demitted this charge on the 5th of January, 1795, and died 
on the 3rd of June, 1797, leaving a widow and family. Mean- 
while, Mr. Joseph Jackson was ordained his assistant on the 
11th of June, 1795. Mr. Jackson's ministry was short, as 
he died on the 17th of January, 1801. The next minister 
was Mr. John Huey, who was ordained here on the 17th of 
August, 1802. On the 25th of April, 1809, the Presbytery 
dissolved the connection between the congregation and Mr. 
Huey, on account of his intemperance and other irregularities. 
He was succeeded by Mr. William Simpson Maclaine, who 
was ordained here on the 20th December, 1809. Mr. Huey 
was subsequently put under the care of the Presbytery of 
Tyrone, and died April 26th, 1820. In consequence of 
charges relating to certain money transactions, the Presbytery 
of Armagh, on the 1st of May, 1832, suspended Mr. Maclaine 
sine die, which sentence was confirmed by the Synod in June 



108 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

following. He died in December, 1835, leaving a family. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Daniel Gunn Brown, who was 
ordained by the Presbytery of Armagh on the 5th of March, 
1833. On the 13th of May, 1835, the Presbytery dissolved 
the connection between Creggan and Newton-Hamilton, 
erected Creggan into a separate charge, and Mr. Brown con- 
tinued in charge of Newton-Hamilton. The first minister of 
Creggan, as a separate congregation, was Mr. Thomas 
M' Williams, who was ordained here on the 27th of April, 
1837. Mr. M'Williams becoming infirm, Mr. Thomas 
Croskery was ordained his assistant on the 17th of July, 
1860. Mr. Croskery (now D.D. ; and Professor of Theology 
in Magee College), resigned the charge on the 25th of 
February, 1863, on his removal to Clonakilty, and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. John Anderson, who was ord8,ined here on the 
1st of September, 1863. Mr. M'Williams died on the 16th 
of June of the same year. Mr. Anderson resigned this 
charge on the 6th of May, 1879, having accepted a call from 
Grey abbey ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert J. Smyth, 
who was installed here on the 26th of August, 1879. Mr. 
Smyth, having accepted a call from Tartaraghan, resigned 
this charge on the 6th of March, 1882 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Robert R. Drysdale, who was installed here on the 
23rd of May, 1882. 

CROAGHMORE. 

This congregation was erected in 1828. The first minister 
was Mr. Robert J. Kennedy, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Route, on the 23rd of February, 1830. Mr. 
Kennedy died in this charge on the 19th of August, 1851 ; 
and on the 17th of August, 1852, Mr. William Ritchie was 
ordained to the pastoral charge. Croaghmore is not far dis- 
tant from the Giants' Causeway; and, in quarries there, 
stones of the same conformation as those at the Causeway 
may be seen. 

CRUMLIN. 

The parent settlement whence this congregation proceeded 
was at Glenavy. At the erection of the congregation of 
Ballinderry, properly so called in 1713, Glenavy was much 
weakened ; and, to effect a reparation, it was proposed, in 1715, 
that the meeting-house be removed to Crumlin, as Lower 
Kilmacaret, which only paid £8 per annum, would, in that 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 109 

case, pay ,£13 per annum. Tlie first minister at this new 
place was Mr. Thomas Crawford, son of Mr. Crawford, of 
Carnmoney, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Belfast on the 10th of June, 1724. He died, July 5th, 1782, 
leaving a widow and family ; and was succeeded by Mr. John 
Gibson, who was ordained on the 18th of February, 1783. 
He died in this charge on the 18th of July, 1796, leaving a 
widow and family. Their next minister was Mr. Nat. 
Alexander,* who was ordained here, September 3rd, 1799. 
He separated from the Synod of Ulster in 1829. On the 6th 
of February, 1838, the Presbytery of Templepatrick erected 
the families in Crumlin who adhered to the Synod into a 
congregation ; and the first minister was Mr. A. C. Canning, 
son of the minister of Malin, who was ordained here on the 
9th of October, 1838. 

CULLYBACKET. 

The first notice we find of this congregation is in connec- 
tion with the ordination of Mr. James M'Creight by the 
Presbytery of Route, on the 13th of December, 1730. He 
died in this charge on the 12th of March, 1757. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Alexander M'Mullan, who had been 
minister of Broughshane, and who removed here in 1758. 
Mr. M'Mullan demitted the charge in September, 1772, and 
removed to America. He was succeeded by Mr. Robert 
Christy, who was ordained hei'e on the 17th of August, 
1773. He died in this charge on the 1st of August, 1818 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. William Cuthbertson, who was 
oi-dained here on the 22nd September, 1818. Mr. Cuth- 
bertson having resigned the charge of the congregation, Mr. 
Hugh Hamilton was ordained on the 6th of May, 1832. Mr. 
Cuthbertson died on the 27th of March, 1836. Mr. Hamilton 
becoming infirm, Mr. George R. Buick was ordained on the 
1st of February, 1868, as his assistant and successor. Mr. 
Hamilton died on the 31st of July, 1882. 

CUMBER, Co. Derry. 

This congregation originally formed part of that of Glen- 
dermot, and there is reason to believe that the famous Colonel 
Adam Murray, the hero of the siege of DeiTy, was then con- 

* Mr. Alexander had an Academy at Crumlin, which educated a 
large number of highly respectable pupils. 



110 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

nected with it. It became a separate charge about 1717 ; and 
its first minister was Mr. Major Murray, who was ordained 
here on the 15th of April, 1718. He died in this charge in 
February, 1751. He was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Patton, 
who was ordained here on the 3i-d of July, 1 753. He died in 
this charge on the 30th of June, 1799, leaving a family. The 
next minister was Mr. James Allison, who was ordained here 
on the 14th of September, 1800. Mr. Allison died on the 
13th of September, 1853 ; and on the 27th of December 
following, his son, the Rev. Samuel S. Allison, who had 
previously been minister of Donegore, was installed as his 
successor. On the 14th of November, 1867, Mr. Allison re- 
signed the charge of Cumber, and returned to Donegore — 
where he appeared to be the only minister likely to please the 
congregation ; and on the 5th of May, 1868, Mr. S. M. Dill, 
son of Professor Dill of Queen's College, Belfast, was ordained 
to the pastoral charge of Cumber. This congregation is 
commonly known as Lower Cumber, and is thus distinguished 
from another congregation in the same Presbytery of Glen- 
dermot, and which is called Upper Cumber. Mr. Dill, on 
his removal to 1st Ballymena, resigned this charge in May, 
1874 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Morrison, who was 
ordained here on the 10th of November of the same year. 

CUSHENDUN. 

Cfshendun and Cushendall, two beautiful watering places 
in the glens of Antrim, had at an early date some Presbyterian 
settlers. In 1708 we find Mr. James Stuart minister at 
Cushendall. He had previously resigned the charge of the 
congregation of Macosquin. The place was not, however, 
sufficient to support a minister ; and Mr. Stuart obtained 
special aid from a fund then at the disposal of the Synod 
of Ulster. He died here on the 22nd of March, 1719. For 
a long time afterwards there was no Presbyterian minister 
settled in this district ; and those of our communion who 
resided there had to travel far when they wished to enjoy 
Presbyterian ordinances. At length a movement was made 
to revive the Presbyterian interest in this locality ; and in 
November, 1848, the Presbytery of Ballymena, in conjunction 
with the Presbytery of Route, formed the Presbyterians of 
the Glens into a congregation. The site of the meeting- 
house led to much discussion ; but, in the end, it was 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. Ill 

arranged that it should be erected between Cushendall and 
Cushendun. On the 23rd of October, 1849, Mr. Charles 
Gillis was ordained here by the Presbytery of Ballymena. 

DEEVOCK. 

This congregation was originally known by the name of 
Derrykeichan. We find Mr. John Baird settled here in 1646. 
The minister immediately before the Revolution was Mr. 
Robert Stirling. In 1688 he fled to Scotland and officiated 
at Stevenson till 1695, when he returned to Ireland, and died 
in this charge in 1699. He was uncle to John Stirling, who 
was Principal of Glasgow College in the early part of the 
eighteenth century. He was succeeded as minister of Dervock 
by his son, Thomas Stirling, who was ordained here June 
22nd, 1 703. He died in this charge on the 20th of November, 
1718 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John Orr, who was ordained 
here October 29th, 1723. Mr. Orr died December 5th, 1745. 
The next minister was Mr. Joseph Douglass, who was 
ordained here April 9th, 1751. Becoming infirm, he obtained 
as his assistant Mr. Alexander Martin, who was ordained 
here May 18th, 1790. Mr. Douglass died December 14th, 
1799. Mr. Martin becoming infirm, obtained as his assistant 
Mr. Joseph Bellis, who was ordained here September 11th, 
1827. Mr. Martin died September 21st, 1838. Mr. Bellis 
becoming infirm, obtained as his assistant Mr. Alexander 
Field, who was ordained here on the 2nd of September, 1857. 
Mr. Bellis died on the 31st of July, 1872. 

DONAGHADEE 1st. 

The first minister of whom we have any record here was 
Mr. Nevin, who had previously been an Episcopalian, but 
who became a Presbyterian in 1642. He was succeeded by 
Mr. Andrew Stewart, son to Mr. A. Stewart, minister of 
Donegore. He was ordained here about the year 1658. He 
suffered many severe trials and persecutions, but died in this 
charge, January 2nd, 1671. The next notice of this congre- 
gation does not occur till 1697, when we find the Presbytery 
of Down stating to the Synod of Ulster, " that they used 
their best endeavours to bring Mr. Henry Hamilton to 
Donaghadee, but to none effect." It continued vacant till 
this object was at last accomplished ; and Mr. Hamilton, who 



112 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

had been minister first of Falkland, and afterwards of 
Currie, was installed here in February, 1701. He was the son 
of the Rev. A. Hamilton, of Bangor. He died in this charge 
in August, 1730. The commissioner of the congregation to 
the Synod, in 1731, was Joseph Madowell, Esq. They had 
called Mr. M'Bride, of Ballymoney, and Lord Mount 
Alexander had written to the Presbytery of Route, requesting 
them to permit him to remove to Donaghadee ; but the Synod 
appointed him to continue in Ballymoney. Their next minister 
was Mr. James Maxwell Stewart, ordained here, March 7th, 
1733. He died in this charge, June 2nd, 1743; and was 
succeeded by Mr. William Wai-nock, ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Bangor, May 20th, 1747. He died, January 
19th, 1768, leaving a widow and family ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. John Adams, ordained by the Presbytery of Bangor, 
December 8th, 1772. He died, January 9th, 1779, leaving 
neither widow nor family. Their next minister was Mr. 
Alexander Goudy, ordained here, March 14th, 1780. His 
relation to this congregation was dissolved by the Presbytery, 
June 30th, 1791, and he emigrated to America. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. James Knox, formerly minister at Drum- 
banagher, who was installed here, March 18th, 1794. On the 
1st of May, 1798, Mr. Knox resigned this charge on account of 
mental infirmity. Their next minister was Mr. John Arnold, 
ordained here on the 11th of June, 1799. Mr. Knox died 
March 22nd, 1801; and Mr. Arnold died, August 10th, 1811, 
leaving a widow and family. Their next minister was Mr. 
William Skelly, ordained here, September 15th, 1812. In 
August, 1819, he was suspended swie die for alleged immorality, 
and the congregation declared vacant. The next minister 
was Mr. John M'Aulay, who was ordained here on the 4th of 
June, 1822. A pai't of the congregation still adhered to Mr. 
Skelly, and a second meeting-house was erected by them in 
Donaghadee. On the 10th of January, 1849, the Rev. W. J. 
Skelly, son of Mr. Skelly, was ordained by the Presbytery of 
Belfast to the pastoral charge of this congregation. In 1856, 
a commission of the General Assembly was appointed to re- 
consider the case of Mr. Skelly, sen. This commission agreed 
on the expediency of restoring him to the ministerial status. 
Some members protested against this finding ; but before the 
case could come before the annual meeting of 1857, for final 
adjudication, Mr, Skelly died. Mr. M'Aulay becoming infirm, 
obtained as his assistant Mr. William Witherow, who was 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 113 

ordained here on the 3rd of March, 1874. Mr. M'Aulay died 
on the 27th of February, 1879. Mr. Witherow, on his re- 
moval to Killyleagh, resigned this charge on the 16th of 
March, 1882 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Walker, 
who was installed here on the 25th of July, 1882. 



DONAGHADEE 2nd. 

The origin of this congregation is given in the account of 
1st Donaghadee. It may be added that Mr. W. J. Skelly 
died on the 20th of July, 1875 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Weir Hamilton (now LL.D.), who was ordained 
here on the 23rd of March, 1876. 



DONAGHEADY 1st. 

The first minister mentioned as connected with Donagheadv 
is Mr. John Hamilton, who was ordained here in 1658. In 
1688 he retired to Scotland, but he must soon have returned, 
as he was in DeiTy during the siege. He probably died 
shortly afterwards. The next minister was Mr. Thomas 
Winsley, who had been licensed by the Presbytery of Edin- 
burgh, and had come to Ireland in 1698. He was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Lagan on the 18th of January, 
1699 ; he died October 28th, 1736. lie was succeeded by 
Mr. William Armstrong, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Strabane on the 21st of July, 1741. He died 
in this charge on the 17th of May, 1761 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. James Turbit, who was ordained here on the 19th of 
June, 1764. He died June 14th, 1783, leaving a widow and 
family. The next minister was Mr. Hugh Hamil, ordained 
here on the 4th of March, 1784. He died December 7th, 
1803, leaving a widow and family ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. William M'Crea, ordained here December 13th, 1804. 
He died suddenly on the 17th of June, 1832, leaving neither 
widow nor family. The next minister was Mr. Samuel 
T. Wray, ordained here March 7th, 1833. Mr. Wray 
becoming infirm, obtained as his assistant Mr. John Roul- 
stone, who was ordained here on the 19th of January, 3 860. 
Mr. Wray died on the 16th of September, 1863. 



114 HISTORY OF CONGBEGATIONS. 



DONAGHEADY 2nd. 



This congregation originated in disputes relative to the 
appointment of a minister in the old congregation. The new 
congregation was annexed to the Presbytery of Letterkenny, 
Its first minister was Mr. Robert Wirling, formerly of Kilrea, 
who was installed here on the 13th of August, 1741. He 
died in this charge in April, 1765. Mr. John M'Mean had 
previously been ordained his assistant on the 15th of July, 
1762. He was deposed in October, 1777; and was succeeded 
by Mr. John Holmes, who was ordained here on the 13th of 
April, 1779. Mr. Holmes, becoming infirm, resigned the 
charge in 1830 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Francis Porter, 
who was ordained here on the 28th of July, 1831. Mr. 
Holmes died on the 5th November of the same year. Mr. 
Porter died on the 22nd of November, 1872 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. George Magill, formerly of Cork, who was 
installed here on the 23rd of April, 1874. Mr. Magill, on 
his removal to Belfast, resigned this charge on the 11th of 
November, 1880 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert Frizell, 
who was ordained here on the 19th of May, 1881. 

DONEGAL. 

This congregation was formerly called Raneny. We have 
no notices of it before the Revolution. In March, 1698, we 
find it jDresenting a call to Mr. Thomas Craighead, and 
promising to advance half a year's salary towards defraying 
the charge of transporting his family from Scotland. He 
accepted their call, and Mr. Alexander, of Raphoe, served 
the edict at Mountcharles. Mr. Craighead was ordained on 
the 6th July, 1698. He either died about 1714, or went to 
America, but thei'e is no mention either of his death or 
removal in the Synod's records. He was succeeded by Mr. 
John Holmes, who had been received by the Synod from the 
Presbytery of Lanark in 1713, and was ordained here on the 
27th September, 1715. He was called to Ardstraw in 1731, 
but the Synod decided that he should remain here. He 
■removed to the 2nd congregation of Glendermot in April, 
1744. Their next minister was Mr. Andrew Hamilton, who 
vas ordained here on the 26th of December, 1744. He died 
in December, 1763, leaving a widow ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Robert Caldwell, who was ordained to the joint charges 



HISTOET OF CONGREGATIONS. 116 

of Donegal, Motintcharles, and Beleek on tlie 16tli of June, 
1767. His call from these united congregations, dated 18th 
August, 1766, was in 1865 in possession of his very worthy 
grandson, Samuel Crawford, Esq., solicitor, Ballyshannon. 
Mr. Caldwell was married to the daughter of the Rev. 
Samuel Delap, minister of Letterkenny. Mr. Delap's wife, 
whose name was Sarah, was the daughter of the Rev. Robert 
Campbell, minister of Ray, who had fled from Scotland 
rather than take the oath of unqualified obedience to 
Charles II., and settled at Ray in 1671. Mr. Delap's direct 
ancestor four generations back, that is, in 1580, resided near 
Irvine in Ayrshire. Mr. Caldwell was succeeded in Donegal 
by Mr. William Houston, who was ordained here March 2nd, 
1791. Becoming infirm, Mr. Samuel Thompson was ordained 
his assistant and successor on the 18th of March, 1824. Mr. 
Houston died on the 1st of June, 1831. In May, 1834, 
Ballyshannon was separated from Donegal, and erected into 
a distinct congregation. Mr. Thompson becoming infirm, 
the Rev. Archibald Lowry was installed as his assistant and 
successor on the 29th of August, 1861. Mr. Lowry died on 
the 12th of Januaiy, 1881 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Waddell, who was ordained here on the 19th of 
October, 1881. Mr. Waddell, having accepted a call from 
Knappagh, resigned this charge in the spring of 1884. 
Early in the century a Seceding congregation was erected in 
the town, and Mr. William Niblock (afterwards D.D.), who 
was ordained the minister, collected the funds needed for 
building a church. Dr. Niblock died on the 23rd of July, 
1868, and was succeeded by Mr. Robert Neilson, who was 
ordained here on the 30th of September of the same year. 
The two congregations meanwhile remained weak ; and, on 
the resignation of Mr. Waddell, they agreed to amalgamate 
— Mr. Neilson undertaking to conduct an afternoon service 
for the convenience of the people of Raneny. 

DONEGORE 1st. 

The first minister of this congregation was Mr. Andrew 
Stewart. Several interesting particulars respecting him are 
to be found in the well-known book entitled, " Fleming's 
Fulfilling of the Scriptures." He commenced his ministry 
in this parish about the year 1627, and after seven years 
labour, died in September, 1634, aged 36. His tombstone is 



116 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

in Donegore churcli-yard, and his character is given by 
Livingstone in his " Memorable Characteristics." The next 
minister was Mr. Thomas Crawford, son-in-law to the preced- 
ing. He was settled here bv the Presbytery on the 28th of 
August, 1655, the congregation having been destitute of a 
gospel ministry since the death of Mr. Stewart. He was de- 
posed by Bishop Jeremy Taylor, and his tombstone in the 
church-yard relates that he died in December, 1670, aged 45. 
The next minister was Mr. William Shaw, ordained by the 
Presbytery of Antrim, in 1671, in a private manner, as 
prelatic persecution was then so severe that the ministers 
dare not venture on a public celebration. He demitted the 
charge in consequence of increasing infirmity, in 1687. There 
were then eight elders in the conj^regation. Mr. John Stor- 
mont and Mr. J. M'lveig appeared as commissioners to the 
Presbytery after the resignation of Mr. Shaw. His arrears 
were secured bv Mr. Henry Shaw and Mr. Alexander Adair. 
In February, 1688, Mr. Crawford, Mr. Adair, and Mr. Henry 
Shaw, appeared at the Presbytery with a unanimous call to 
Mr. Francis Iredell, who had been entered on trials in May, 
1683, and licensed in March following. He was ordained 
here June 19th, 1688, Mr. Anthony Kennedy, of Temple- 
patrick, j^reaching and presiding. Mr. Shaw died the next 
month. In 1697, Mr. Iredell was ordered to remove to 
Armagh; but he refused compliance, and was, inconsequence, 
rebuked by the Synod, though permitted to remain in Done- 
gore. In December, 1699, he removed to Capel Street congre- 
gation, Dublin. Mr. Iredell was one of the most distinguished 
ministers of the Synod during his day. He was frequently in 
London on the public business of the Church, and, in 1715, in 
company with Mr. Upton, of Templepatrick,* he waited as a 
deputation from the Synod, on George I., after his arrival in 
England. On his return, Mr. Iredell reported that his Majesty 
received them very graciously, and appeared sensibly concerned 
when told of the grievances under which they laboured. His 
successor in this congregation was Mr. Alexander Brown, 
ordained here December 3rd, 1702. The ministry of Mr. 
Brown exceeded half a century. In 1754, the people applied 
to the Presbytery for supplies ; and Mr. John Wright was 
ordained, April 15th, 1755, as assistant and successor to Mr. 
Brown. Mr. Wright was married to one of the Adairs of 

* Ancestor of Lord Templetown. The Upton family remained con- 
niH'ted with the Irish PresbyierianChurch until their removal to England. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 117 

Lo-ugbmorne. Mr. Brown died, January 2nd, 1758. Mr. 
Wright becomiug infirm, Mr. James Crawford Ledlie was 
ordained his assistant and successor, April 8th, 1806. Mr. 
Wright died, May 1st, 1807, and Mr. Ledlie (afterwards 
D.D.), resigned. May 10th, 1808, and removed to Lame. 
After much disputing, Mr. Henry Cooke, formerly minister 
of Dunean, was installed here, January 22nd, 1811. Mr. 
Cooke (afterwards D.D., LL.D), resigned this charge, July 
6th, 1818, and removed to the congregation of Killyleagh. 
'i'Lioir next minister was Mr. James Seaton Reid, ordained 
here, July 20th, 1819. Mr. Reid (afterwards D.D. and Pro- 
fessor of Church History in the University of Glasgow), 
resigned this charge, July 6th, 1823, and removed to Carrick- 
fergus. He was succeeded l)y Mr. John Dogherty, who was 
ordained here, December 21st, 1824. Becoming intemperate, 
he was, in March, 1836, suspended from the exercise of his 
ministry by a committee of Synod, and subsequently suspen- 
ded sine die. He died under melancholy circumstances, 
February 18th, 1837. After a protracted vacancy, the con- 
gregation chose Mr. Samuel S. Allison, son of the minister 
of Cumber, County Derry, who was ordained here, January 
8th, 1839. In December, 1853, Mr. Allison resigned the 
charge of the congregation, on his removal to Cumber, County 
Den-y, and was succeeded by Mr. William John Grillespie, 
who was ordained here on the 5th of December, 1854. Mr. 
Gillespie, on his removal to Australia, resigned this charge 
on the 7th of May, 1867; and was succeeded by Mr. S. S. 
Allison, who thus returned to his former charge. Mr. Allison, 
becoming infirm, withdrew from the active duties of the 
ministry in May, 1883 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Alexander 
M'Kinney, who was ordained here on the 4th of March, 1884. 
Mr. Allison died on the 19th of November, 1884. 

DONOUGHMORE, Co. Down. 

This congregation was erected off that of Newry in 1705 
during the vacancy there caused by the death of Mr. Lang. 
The first minister was Mr. James Johnson, who was ordained 
by the Presbytery of Armagh on the 23x-d of June, 1707. In 
the following year the Synod annexed Drumbanagher and the 
Glen to this new erection to enable it to maintain its minister. 
Mr. Johnson becoming infirm, Mr. James Richey was ordained 
here as his assistant on the 27th of June, 1763. Mr. Johnson 



118 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

died October 20tli, 1765, leaving a widow and family. Mr. 
Eichey died in this charge on the 7th of December, 1771, 
leaving a widow and family. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Joseph Hay, who was ordained here on the 9th of March, 
1773. He died in this charge on the 15th of May, 1803, 
leaving a widow and family. The next minister was Mr. 
Moses Findlay, who was ordained here on the 4th September, 
1804. In 1837 reports injurious to Mr. Findlay's reputation 
led to an investigation by the Presbytery, when he resigned 
the charge with all its emoluments. The next minister was 
Mr. Verner M. White, who was ordained here in 1840. Mr. 
White resigned the charge on the 5th of July, 1844, having 
accepted a call from Liverpool. He was succeeded by Mr. S. 
J. Moore, who was installed here on the 28th of October, 1845. 
Mr. Moore resigned the charge on the 20th of August, 1850. 
having accepted a call from Ballymena ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Patrick White, who was installed here on the 11th of 
March, 1851. Mr. White resigned the charge on the 26th of 
February, 1862 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John Elliott, who 
was installed here on the 29th of December, 1862. Mr. 
Elliott resigned the charge in 1875 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Henry M'Dowell, ordained here 18th January, 1876. 
Mr. M'Dowell retired from the discharge of active duty, on 
account of declining health, in July 1881 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Lawson Burnett, who was installed here on the 21st 
of December, 1881. Mr. M'Dowell died on the 25th of 
December, 1882. 

DONOUGHMORE, Co. Donegal. 

The first minister of this congregation was Mr. Eobert 
Craghead, who was settled here in 1658. After the Restora- 
tion, Mr. Craghead was deposed by Bishop Leslie. He 
became minister of Derry in 1690, and there distinguished 
himself in a controversy with Dr. King, bishop of the diocese. 
Mr. Craghead was succeeded in Donoughmore by Mr. Joshua 
Fisher, who was settled here in 1694. Mr. Fisher died 
March 11, 1706, and the following inscription on his tomb- 
stone in Donoughmore churchyard is still legible : — 

" The man whose dust under this stone doth ly 
Lov'd much the honour of his God on hy ; 
Those that did ill he could not bear, therefore 
Th' abuse was great he suffered on that score." 

Mr. Fisher was succeeded by Mr. Francis Laird, who was 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 119 

ordained to tlie pastoral charge September 1st, 1709. Mr. 
Laird married the daughter of Captaia Henderson, mentioned 
in the History of the Presbyterian Church in IreLand, (vol. iii., 
page 40, notes, second edition) ; and from this pair Sir 
Thomas M'Clure, D.L., Bart., is lineally descended. Captain 
Henderson, the father-in-law of Mr. Laird, was married to 
the sister of Sir Harry Cairns, baronet. Mr. Laird died 
June 7th, 1742 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Benjamin Holmes, 
who was ordained to the pastoral charge October 25th, 1744. 
Mr. Holmes died in February, 1798 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Samuel Dill (father of the Rev. S. M. Dill, D.D., of Magee 
College), who was ordained to the pastoral charge July 16th, 
1799. Becoming infirm, Mr. Alexander Caldwell was ordained 
as his assistant on the 14th of August, 1844. Mr. Dill died 
in December, 1845. Mr. Caldwell removed to Australia in 
1864 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert Smyth, who was 
ordained here on the 30th of March, 1865. 

DOUGLASS. 

This congregation separated from Clady, with which it 
had been previously connected, in 1831. The first minister 
was Mr. James Alexander, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Letterkenny on the 3rd of November, 1831. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. Robert Dick was ordained as his 
assistant on the 12th of March, 1868. Mr. Alexander died 
sometime afterwards. 

DOWNPATRICK. 

The earliest minister of whom we have any account here 
was Mr. John Fleming. He was deposed in 1661 by Jeremy 
Taylor, Bishop of Down and Connor, for nonconformity ; but 
we do not know what became of him afterwards. His suc- 
cessor was Mr. Archibald Young, who was ordained in June, 
1673. He took refuge in Scotland at the Revolution, and 
in May, 1690, signified his willingness to return to his charge; 
but it seems probable he did not do so, as Mr. John Hutcliin- 
son was ordained here during the same year. Mr. Hutchinson 
was called to Armagh in 1694, but the Presbytery of Down 
did not permit him to remove at that time. He did so 
eventually in 1697. We find Mr. Thomas Jackson here in 
1700 ; and he died in this charge on the 2nd of November, 
1708. His successor was Mr. Thomas Nevin, who was 



120 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

ordained to this charge on the 20th of November, 1711. He 
joined the non-subscribing Presbytery of Antrim in 1725, 
and died here in March, 1744. The congregation was now 
under the care of a succession of ministers of suspected 
orthodoxy, among whom was Mr. William Nevin, who 
resigned the ministry, and became a physician. In 1791 
Mr. James Neilson was ordained to this charge. Mr. Neilson 
died on the 28th of January, 1838. Meanwhile Mr. S. C. 
Nelson became the minister. In August, 1825, certain 
families in the town and neighbourhood applied to the 
Presbytery of Dromore, connected with the Synod of Ulster, 
for preaching, which was granted ; and the Presbytery after- 
wards erected them into a congregation. About this time 
the pious Captain Hamilton Rowan * was governor of Down- 
patrick Jail, and he was mainly instrumental in promoting 
the establishment of the new erection. The first minister 
was Mr. William D. Stewart, who was ordained here on the 
29th of March, 1827. He was a very acceptable and able 
minister, but his career was brief. He died here on the 21st 
of July, 1831. He was succeeded by Mr. James A. Canning, 
son of Mr. Canning, minister of Malin. He was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Dromore on the 4th of September, 
1832. Mr. Canning resigned this charge on the 1st of 
October, 1839, and removed to Mourne. He was succeeded 
by Mr. William White, formerly minister of Killyshandra, 
who was installed here on the 1st of November, 1839. 

DEOGHEDA. 

In 1708 the Presbyterians of Drogheda suj)plicated the 
Synod of Ulster for a supply of religious ordinances. The 
application was granted ; and in 1710 the people gave a call 
to Mr. Hugh Henry, a licentiate of the Down Presbytery, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Armagh on the 27th 
of March, 1711. Mr. Henry died in this charge on the 1st 
of August, 1744. At the meeting of the Synod in 1745 the 
people, at their own request, were transferred to the body 
known as " The Southern Association." What was called 
"the new light" was then making much progress in many 
Presbyterian congregations ; and under its blighting in- 

* Captain Kowan, who was nearly related to the present Lady 
Dufferin, gave influential support to Dr. Cooke throughout the Arian 
controversy. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 121 

fluence religion did not flourish in Drogheda. In the begin- 
ning of the present century Presbyterianism was all but 
extinguished in the place. About that time the Secession 
Church began to send preachers to it ; and in 1822 the Rev. 
Josias Wilson, who had previously been minister of Tassagh, 
was installed in the charge of a newly-erected congregation. 
Mr. Wilson laboured here for years with great acceptance and 
success. In 1836 he was transferred to the newly-erected 
couti'regation of Townsend Street, Belfast ; and was succeeded 
in L>rogheda by Mr. Samuel Boyd. On the 4th of May, 1842, 
Mr. Boyd resigned the pastoral charge ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Thomas Logan, who was installed here on the 16th of 
August of the same year. Mr. Logan resigned the pastoral 
charge on the 29th of June, 1871. In consequence of increas- 
ing physical debility, Mr Logan, in 1865, had applied to the 
Assembly for leave to the congregation to choose an assistant ; 
and on the 8th of November of that year Mr. A. E,. Crawford 
(now LL.D.), was accordingly ordained to the pastoral charge. 

DROMAEA 1st. 

This congregation was originally a part of Dromore. In 
1713 the Synod of Ulster erected it into a distinct congrega- 
tion — annexing to it the townlands of Tullyniskey, Enoch, 
Girvachy, Fedoney, and Carnew, belonging to Magherally 
congregation; with those of Killalen, Leppoch, and the upper 
half of the townland. of Ballykeel belonging to Dromore con- 
gregation. The first minister was Mr. John Campbell, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Armagh, December 
13th, 1715. He died in this charge June 25th, 1724; and 
was succeeded by Mr. John King, who had been licensed by 
the Presbvtery of St. Andrews, in Scotland, and was received 
by the Synod in 1719. He was ordained here by the Presby- 
tery of Armagh, December 14th, 1726. Mr. King died 
November 9th, 1762,; and was succeeded by Mr. James 
Birch, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Dromore, 
August 12th, 1764. Becoming infirm, his grandson, Mr. 
James Birch Black, was ordained his assistant and successor, 
July 30th, 1816. Mr. Birch died November 10th, 1820. 
On the L3th of May, 1823, Mr. Black was suspended sine die 
for drunkenness. Their next minister was Mr. William 
Craig, formerly minister of Carnmoney, who was installed 
here December 26th, 1823. Mr. Craig died on the 22nd of 



122 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

December, 1871 ; and after his death the congregation was 
greatly disturbed by disputes respecting the choice of a 
successor. There was in the end a strong secession to the 
Reformed Presbyterians, who illegally toolc possession of the 
meeting-house, and held it until compelled by legal proceed- 
ings to give it up. After a lengthened vacancy, Mr. William 
Shepherd, formerly of 2nd Stewartstown, was installed here 
on the 23rd of September, 1874. Mr. Shepherd, having 
resigned this charge after a short incumbency, was succeeded 
by Mr. John R. M'Cleery, who was installed here on the 28th 
September, 1880. Mr. M'Cleery, on his removal to another 
charge, was succeeded by Mr. Edward Ekin, who was ordained 
here on the 28th of March, 1884. 

DROMORE 1st. 

It appears that the earliest minister of Dromore was Mr. 
Henry Hunter, who seems to have died shortly after the 
Restoration. Mr. William Leggat was next settled here. 
He was licensed by the Presbytery of Antrim in 1670, and 
was shortly afterwards ordained to the charge of this con- 
gregation. At the Revolution he retired for some time to 
Scotland; but in 1691 he returned here. He was Moderator 
of the Synod of Ulster in 1693, but absent from it in 1694, 
The congregation was vacant in 1697, but whether in con- 
sequence of the death of Mr. Leggat or his removal to 
Scotland, is not known. The next minister was Mr. Alexander 
Colville, who was ordained here in 1700. He died on the 1st 
61 December, 1719. In 1724 the majority of the congrega- 
tion, by their commissioners, Messrs. Robert Hamilton and 
Thomas Ingram, supplicated the Synod to be annexed to the 
Presbytery of Down ; and a minority, by their commissioner, 
Mr. John Magill, supplicated to be continued with the 
Presbytery of Armagh. The Synod annexed them to Down, 
The subscription controversy had now commenced, and this 
congregation felt the effects of it. In 1724 Mr. Alexander 
Colville, son of the preceding minister — being refused 
ordination by the Presbytery, because he refused to subscribe 
the 'Westminster Confession of Faith — repaired to London, 
and was ordained there. He was afterwards irregularly 
installed in Dromore by the Synod of Munster. For this he 
was suspended by the Synod of Ulster in 1725, and many of 
the people withdrew from his ministry, and formed another 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 123 

congregation in Dromore. The first minister of this congre- 
gation was Mr. James Allen, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Armagh on the 18th of May, 1726. He 
appears to have demitted this charge about 1752. He was 
succeeded by Mr, William Henry, who was ordained here on 
the 1st of May, 1753. Mr. Allen died on the 14th of 
January, 1764. Mr. Henry — who was grandfather of Dr. 
Henry, late President of Queen's College, Belfast — resigned 
this charge and removed to Comber, County Down, in 1776. 
He was succeeded by Mr. John Cochrane, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Dromore on the 5th of May, 1777. 
He died September 8th, 1779, leaving neither widow nor 
family. He was succeeded by Mr. James Waddle, who was 
ordained here on the 3rd of August, 1784. He died in this 
charge on the 12th of July, 1815, leaving a widow and 
family ; and was succeeded by Mr. James Collins, who was 
ordained here on the 17th of September, 1816. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. Collins obtained leave for the congregation to 
choose an assistant and successor ; and on the 20th of 
January, 1857, Mr. Jackson Smyth was ordained here. Some 
time afterwards Mr. Smyth (now D.D.) resigned the pastoral 
charge, on his removal to Armagh ; and on the 27th of 
March, 1860, Mr. James Kirker Strain was ordained to this 
charge. Mr. Collins died on the 19th of December, 1863. 

DEUM 1st. 

This congregation was originally called Dartry. In 1675 the 
Tyrone Presbytery asked advice about removing Mr. William 
Leggatt from Dartry, a statement from which it appears that 
the congregation was early settled. Its next minister was 
Mr. Hugh Kelso, who was ordained here on the 30th of 
March, 1704. He died February 7th, 1706. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Samuel M'Gaughey, who was ordained here on 
the 22nd September, 1708. In 1718 the congregation was 
divided, part of it being erected into a separate congregation 
at Cootehill. Mr. M'Gaughey (or Gachim) died October 
12th, 1722, He was succeeded by Mr. Matthew Chalmers, 
who was ordained here in 1725. In 1729 Mr. Chalmers was 
removed by the Synod to Plunket Street congregation, Dublin. 
He was succeeded here by Mr. Alexander M'Kee, who was 
ordained here on the 16th of May, 1733. Mr. M'Kee was 
removed to Bailieborough in May, 1761. We have not been 



124 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

able to recover the name of the minister who next succeeded ; 
but Mr. James Walker was ordained here on the 11th of 
December, 1786. He died in this charge on the 20th 
November, 1825, leaving neither widow nor family. Their 
next minister was Mr. William M'Ewen, who was ordained 
here on the 4th of October, 1826. On the 13th of May, 1849, 
Mr. M'Ewen resigned this charge and emigrated to America. 
He was succeeded by Mr. James D. Crawford, who was 
ordained here on the 27th September, 1849. Mr. Crawford 
resigned the charge on the 13th of February, 1866, on his 
removal to Hillhall ; and was succeeded by Mr. James Steen, 
who was ordained on the 29th of June, 1866. Mr. Steen re- 
signed this charge on his removal to Turlough, on the 13th 
of April, 1880 ; and the congregations of 1st and 2nd Drum 
were then amalgamated. On the 5th of May, 1881, Mr. 
Joseph M'Kinstry was installed as minister of the united 
charge. Mr. M'Kinstry, on his removal to Randalstown 
shortly afterwards, was succeeded by Mr. George Stuart 
Moorehead, who was ordained here on the 13th of December, 
1883. 

DEUMACHOSE. 

This congregation originated in a dispute relative to the 
choice of a minister in Newt own limavady in 1742. Many of 
the people were favourable to Mr. Areslvine or Erskine ; but 
his opponents obtained possession of the meeting-house, 
and induced the Presbytery of Antrim to ordain Mr. Joseph 
Osborne. Mr. Erskine's friends were now formed into the 
congregation of Drumachose, and he was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Derry on the 4th of May, 1742. Mr. Erskine's 
ministry was not comfortable. He was often in collision with 
his brethren, and he was charged with various irregularities. 
He demitted the charge in 1761, and was succeeded by Mr. 
Jacob Davis, who was ordained hei-e by the Presbytery of 
Route on the 26th of April, 1763. He died December 30th, 
1786, leaving a widow. The next minister was Mr. Daniel 
Blair, who was ordained here in the end of May, 1788. He 
died here on the 10th of February, 1811, leaving a widow and 
family ; and was succeeded by Mr. Richard Dill, formerly 
minister of Buckna, who was installed here on the 10th of 
March, 1812. He resigned the charge January 28th, 1823, 
and removed to the adjoining congregation of Bally kelly. 
The next minister was Mr. John M'Laughlin, who was or- 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 125 

daincd here on the 28th of September, 1824. Mr. M'Laughlin, 
died suddenly on the 3rd of November, 1831 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. George Steen, who was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Route on the 12th of March, 1833. Mr. Steen 
resigned the charge on the 31st of March, 1845, and removed 
to the lately erected congregation of 2nd Newtownlimavady ; 
and on the "25th of November, 1845, Mr. Nathaniel M'Auley 
Brown (now D.D.), was ordained to the pastoral charge. 
According to the last return, the congregation consists of 206 
families. 

DRUMBANAGHER 1st. 

This congregation was originally a part of Newry congre- 
gation. At the erection of Donoughmore into a congregation, 
it formed a part of it, though the people were averse to the 
junction. The first notice we have of it as a separate charge 
is on the occasion of the ordination of Mr. Charles Heslem 
on the 22nd of July, 1740. Mr. Heslem's ministry was very 
short, as he died on the 27th of March, 1741. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Michael Henry, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Killyleagh on the 20th of October, 1742. He 
died April 1st, 1789, leaving a widow and family. The next 
minister was Mr. James Knox, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Killyleagh on the 29th of June, 1789. Mr. 
Knox removed to Donaghadee in February, 1794; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Alexander Patterson, who was ordained 
here on the 14th of June, 1796. Mr. Patterson resigned this 
charge in October, 1805, on his removal to Magherally. The 
next minister was Mr. James Black, who was ordained hei-e 
on the 4th of March, 1806. In August, 1831, the Presbytery, 
by permission of Synod, authorised the congregation to choose 
an assistant and successor to Mr. Black ; and accordingly 
Mr. John Irvine was ordained as his assistant and successor 
on the 8th of May, 1832. Mr. Irvine died at Clonmel, whilst 
there on the service of the Synod's Mission, on the 17th of 
April, 1835, and was succeeded in this charge by Mr. John 
Henry, who was ordained here on the 13th of October, 1835. 
Mr. Henry resigned this charge on the 26th of November, 
1839, and removed to Corboy. The next minister was Mr. 
Robert R. Lindsay, who was ordained here on the 18th of 
August, 1840. 



126 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 



DEUMBO. 



The earliest notice we have of this congregation is in 1655, 
when we find Mr. Henry Livingston ordained here. He was 
nephew to the famous John Livingston, of Killinchy. He 
continued in this charge till April, 1697, when he died, aged 
66 years. His successor was Mr. Edward Bailly, who was 
ordained here shortly after, and who died June 23rd, 1703. 
The next minister was Mr. Tliomas Gowan, ordained here 
March 29th, 1706. In 1716, he had an unanimous call from 
the English Presbyterian Church at Leyden, in Holland, 
which the Synod permitted him to accept. He was succeeded 
by Mr. Patrick Bruce, son of Mr. James Bruce, of Killyleagh, 
and brother of Mr. Michael Bruce, of Holy wood. Mr. Patrick 
Bruce was ordained here on the 12th of June, 1717. Towards 
the close of the year 1728, he resigned this charge, and re- 
moved to Scotland, where he became minister of Killalan, in 
the Presbytery of Paisley, whence he subsequently returned 
to Killileagh. In 1 729, the congregation of JDrumbo was put 
under the care of the Presbytery of Bangor. In 1730, their 
commissioner, Captain Hamilton Maxwell, supplicated the 
Synod for supplies of probationers. Their next minister was 
Mr. Andrew Malcom, who was ordained here, November 27th, 
1731. He died in this charge on the 2nd of March, 1763, and 
left a widow. He was succeeded by Mr. James Malcom, 
probably his son, who was ordained here on the 24th of 
December, 1764. In 1775, commissioners from the congre- 
gation reported to the Synod that Mr. Malcom had not been 
able to officiate for two years, and requesting to be declared 
vacant, which was granted. Their next minister was Mr. Hugh 
M'Kee, ordained here by the Presbytery of Belfast, September 
25th, 1776. He demitted the charge in June, 1781. In 1792, 
Mr. Malcom having recovered, the people applied for his re- 
storation to the ministry among them. The Synod appointed 
a committee to judge the case. They installed him in his 
charge towards the close of the same year ; and the Synod 
approved of this proceeding. In May, 1794, in consequence 
of indisposition and infirmity, Mr. Malcom was again obliged 
to resign the pastoral charge. The next minister was Mr. 
Samuel Hanna,* who was licensed by the Presbytery of Bally- 
mena in 1790, and ordained here on the first Tuesday of 

* Afterwards D.D., and tlie first Professor of Divinity appointed by 
the Synod of Ulster. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 127 

August, 1795. He removed to Belfast in 1799, and was 
succeeded by Mr. James Riddle, who was ordained here on 
the 3rd of September, 1800. Mr. Malcom died October 3rd, 
1805, leaving a widow and family. In 1825, Mr. Riddle was 
suspended for twelve months, and, in 1826, he was sus2:)ended 
sme die. The next minister was Mr. Campbell Blakely, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Belfast, July 4th, 
1827. Mr. Riddle died February 25th, 1828. Mr. Blakely 
becoming infirm, Mr. James M'Neill was ordained his assis- 
tant and successor on the 7th of May, 1867. Mr. Blakley 
died in December, 1872. 

DRUMLOUGH. 

In 1816 the inhabitants of this district supplicated the 
Synod of Ulster for supplies every Lord's Day. In 1817 
they stated that the Presbytery of Dromore had supplied 
them with preaching one Sabbath in the month, and that 
they were able to support a minister. Their erection was, 
however, deferred for another year ; but in 1818 they were 
at length recognised as a separate congregation in connection 
with the Presbytery of Dromore. The Presbytery received 
instructions not to ordain a minister until the debt due for 
the building of the meeting-house had been liquidated. The 
first minister was Mr. Samuel Crory, who was ordained here 
on the 23rd of March, 1819. In 1852, in consequence of 
certain charges preferred against him, Mr. Crory was set 
aside ; and on the 2nd of July, 1855, Mr. John M'Clelland 
was ordained to the pastoral charge. Mr. Crory, who was 
subsequently restored, died on the 19th of May, 1861. 

DRUMQUIN. 

In 1792 Drumquin was separated from Castlederg and 
joined to Pettigo. Mr. Thomas Anderson was ordained the 
first minister of this joint-charge on the 21st of March, 1794. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. Samuel Armour was ordained his 
assistant on the 7th of December, 1812. Mr. Anderson died 
on the 27th of th.e same month, leaving a widow and family. 
In November, 1827, the congregation of Pettigo was dis- 
annexed from Drumquin and formed into a separate charge. 
Mr. Armour died on the 10th of March, 1844. He was 
succeeded by Mr. John Davison, who was ordained here on 
the 4th of June, 1845. 



128 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS, 

DUBLIN— MAEY'S ABBEY— now EUTLAND SQUAEE. 

This coBgregation was at first known by the name of 
Capel Street. It originated in a division of the congregation 
of Bull-alley under Mr. William Jacque, who separated from 
that people, and bringing with him such as adhered to him, 
founded this new settlement in 1672. For this he was 
censured by the brethren in the North in the October of that 
year. He apologised to them for the step he had taken ; 
and in May, 1673, " appeared before the Presbytery of 
Antrim, and gave satisfaction for his former irregularities in 
gathering a congregation after having been declared loosed 
from Bull-alley." He did not continue in this charge above 
ten years, when differences again arose between him and the 
people. He is mentioned in Eenwick's Letters in 1683. A 
party went off in the middle of the year 1684, and founded 
another congregation at New-market. Mr. Jacque, however, 
continued in Capel Street. In March, 1691, he being 
valetudinary, their commissioner, Mr. Samuel Martin, applied 
to the Presbytery of Antrim — to which this congregation was 
annexed — to assist them in prosecuting a call to Mr. A. 
Hutchinson of Saintfield. This was granted, and Mr. 
Hutchinson was removed thither. He continued here, i^ow- 
ever, only till April, 1692, when, on account of his ill-health, 
he is loosed from this, and restored to his former charge in 
Saintfield. At the same time the Synod declared Capel 
Street to be " free of any relation to Mr. Jacque, he ha\ing 
never been fixed here by the Presbytery." Being thus free 
to choose a minister, their commissionei's, Messrs. S. Martin, 
Thomas Bond, and Patrick Campbell, gave a call to Mr. 
Eobert Henry, minister of Carrickfergus, in April, 1692 ; and, 
though his removal is opposed by Carrickfergus, he is 
transported hither in the end of that year. In June, 1698, 
they apply by their commissioners, Messrs. Patrick Campbell 
and Jo. Williamson, for leave to call a colleague to Mr. Henry 
— " he being now crazy." They soon after called Mr. Francis 
Iredell, minister of Donegore ; and Mr. Henry dying in the 
beginning of the year 1699, the Synod in June of that year 
removed him to this charge — they promising him <£100 per 
annum, and to defray the expenses of his transportation. 
The congregation increasing, the Synod sanctioned them in 
becoming a collegiate charge. They accordingly called Mr. 
John Milling, who, producing bis license from London, and 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 129 

testimonials from Lejden — where lie had been a minister — 
was installed here June 23rd, 1702. He died June 17th, 
1705.* His successor, as colleague to Mr. Iredell, was Mr. 
Laughlin Campbell, minister in the Highland charge at 
Campbeltown in Kintyre, who was installed here by the 
Presbytery of Belfast on the 10th of September, 1707. He 
was not more than a year in this charge — as he died on the 
6th of October, 1708. In 1709 their commissioners, James 
Kennedy, Esq., and Mr. Daniel Mills, commissioned by 
Alderman Bell and others, presented a call to Mr. Robert 
Craighead, jun., son of the minister of Derry. He accepted 
the call in preference to one from Derry; and he was 
accordingly ordained here as the third colleague to Mr. 
Iredell on the 11th of October, 1709. Mr. Craighead died 
in this charge on the 31st of July, 1738, aged fifty-four; and 
Mr. Iredell died on the 31st of January, 1739 — so that the 
congregation was now altogether vacant. The first minister 
they obtained was Mr. James Smith, formerly minister at 
Newtownards — who was installed here on the 15th of 
February, 1740. In 1744 their commissioners, Col. Jo. 
Martin and Mr. Jo. Errving, supplicated the Synod to trans- 
port Mr. John Brown of Ballymena, but the application was 
refused. Mr. Smith died on the 23rd of February, 1745 — 
Mr. Charles M'Collum, formerly minister of Loughbrickland, 
having been installed here a little before. His colleague was 
Mr. William Wight, who was ordained here August 9th, 
1753. He became Professor of Church History in Glasgow 
in 1762, and afterwards, in 1778, Professor of Divinity in the 
same university. He died in 1783. Mr. M'Collum demitted 
his charge hex-e in May, 1765 ; and Mr. William Knox suc- 
ceeded him on the 21st of the same month. He was after- 
wards settled at Dunbo. Their next minister was Mr. John 
Beard, from the Isle of Man, who was installed here on the 
11th of January, 1767. In 1777 the relation of Mr. Beard 
to this congregation was dissolved, and he was deposed from 
the ministry for several immoralities. He afterwards con- 
formed to the Episcopal Establishment, and obtained the 
benefice of Cloughran. The next minister was Mr. Benjamin 
M'Dowell (afterwards D.D.), formerly minister of Ballykelly, 
who removed here in 1778. Mr. James Horner (also after- 
wards D.D.) was ordained here as co-pastor on the 4th of 

* Mr. Milling is mentioned in "Steven's History of the Scottish 
Church, Pwotterdam," p. 315, as minister of Leyden in 1696. 

I 



130 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

November, 1791. Dr. M'Dowell becoming infirm, Mr. James 
Carlisle (afterwards D.D.) was ordained his assistant on tbe 
14tli of May, 1813. Dr. M'Dowell died on the 13th 
September, 1824. Dr. Horner becoming infirm, Mr. W. B. 
Kirkpatrick (afterwards D.D.) was ordained his assistant 
and successor on the 29th of July, 1829.* Dr. Horner died 
in January, 1843, leaving Messrs. Carlisle and Kirkpatrick 
the two ministers of this charge. Dr. Carlisle, who had 
meanwhile retired to Birr to conduct missionary operations 
there, died in Dublin on the 31st of March, 1854. On the 
8th of September, 1858, the Rev. John Hall, formerly, 
minister of 1st Ai-magh (and afterwards D.D.), was installed 
here as colleague to Dr. Kirkpatrick. Soon afterwards, 
Alexander Findlater, Esq., J. P., erected at his own expense 
the splendid church of Rutland Square and presented it to the 
congregation. On Dr. Hall's removal to New York in 1867, 
he was succeeded by the Rev. David M'Kee, formerly of 
Ballywalter, who was installed here on the 8th of February, 
1869. On the 27th of August, 1879, Mr. M'Kee resigned 
this charge on his removal to New Zealand ; and on the 20th 
of January, 1880, the Rev. Andrew Charles Murphy, formerly 
minister of 1st Derry (and now D.Lit.), was installed here. 
On his removal to London, Dr. Murphy resigned the charge 
on the 22nd of August, 1883; and was succeeded by the Rev. 
J. S. Hamilton, formerly minister of 1st Banbridge, who was 
installed here on the 20th of March, 1884. Dr. Kirkpatrick 
died on the 23rd of September, 1882. 



DUBLIN— USHER'S QUAY— now ORMOND QUAY. 

This congregation originated in the year 1717. Mr. 
Arbuckle, who died in 1721, was the first minister. In 1721 
their commissioners, Messrs. Bagnal, Newton, Lord, and 
Aickman, presented a call to Mr. William Gray of Taboin. 
The Synod ordered him to remove hither ; but he was not 
installed until 1724. He demitted the charge in 1728, and 
returned to the North. Their next minister was Mr. Robert 
M'Master, from Connor, who was installed here in 1729. 

* At this time the entrance to Mary's Abbey was, not from Capel 
Street, but by an inconvenient lane. An entrance direct from Capel 
Street was then purchased. In the reign of Henry VIII. the Irish 
Parliament met in Mary's Abbey. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 131 

The congregation increased so much that they found it 
necessary to take a colleague to Mr. M'Master. They 
obtained Mr. William M'Beath of Urney, who was installed 
here in 1745. Mr. M'Master died February 27th, 1754 ; and 
Mr. M'Beath died in the following year. The next minister 
was Mr. Thomas Vance of Eamelton, who was removed here 
in 1755. His colleague was Mr. Robert Nichol, who was 
ordained here on the 11th of September, 1760. He died in 
this charge in October, 1762. He was succeeded by Mr. 
James Caldwell, who was ordained here June 11th, 1763. 
Mr. Vance died June 1st, 1772. The congregation of Plunket 
Street now united with Usher's Quay under Mr. Caldwell ; 
and in 1780 Mr. Hugh Moore, formerly minister of Billy, 
removed here as his colleague. He was installed by the 
Presbytery of Dublin on the 19th October of that year. Mr. 
Caldwell died on the 24th of May, 1783. He was succeeded 
by Mr. William Wilson, formerly minister of Magherafelt, 
who was installed here in 1785. He died on the 9th of June, 
1807. He was succeeded by Mr. W. D. H. M'Ewen, who was 
ordained here on the 16th of March, 1808. He resigned this 
charge on the 30th of June, 1813 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
Samuel Simson, who was ordained as colleague to Mr. Moore 
on the 23rd of May, 1815. Mr. Moore died on the 14th of 
December, 1824, leaving Mr. Simson in the sole charge of 
the congregation, in which he continued till the year 1835, 
when Mr. Eichard Dill, formerly minister of Tandragee, was 
installed as his colleague on the 26th of August of that year. 
Mr. Simson died about 1846.* Mr. Dill died on the 8th of 
December, 1858 ; and was succeeded by the Rev. John James 
Black (now LL.D.), who was installed here on the 31st of 
May, 1859. During Mr. Dill's time a fine new church was 
built on Ormond Quay, when the congregation assumed its 
present designation. On his removal to Inverness, Dr. Black 
resigned this charge on the 21st of December, 1871 ; and 
was succeeded by the Rev. James Cargin, who was installed 
here on the 14th of January, 1873. On his removal to 1st 
Derry, Mr. Cargin resigned this charge on the 1st of 
December, 1880 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Prenter, 
who was installed here on the 13th of July, 1881. 

* Mrs. Magee, who bequeathed legacies amouuting to £60,000 for 
Presbyterian objects— including £20,000 for founding Magee College- 
was a member of Mr. Dill's congregation. 



132 HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

DUNBOE 1st. 

The first minister of Dunboe is said to have been Mr. 
Thomas Fulton, who was here in 1660. He appears to have 
been succeeded by Mr. Blair; but of his ministry nothing is 
now known with certainty. The next minister was Mr. John 
Wilson, who was here in 1684. He fled to Scotland in the 
troublous times which preceded the Revolution ; and settled 
at Largs. The Presbytery of Irwin in 1691 supplicated for 
his removal from Dunboe, but the Synod of Ulster refused 
to accede to this proposal. He continued, notwithstanding, 
to remain in Scotland, and at length in 1697 the Synod 
yielded, and he was formally installed at Largs. After this 
a Mr. Woodside ajDpears for some time to have ministered to 
the people. In October, 1 719, Mr. Robert Knox was ordained 
to the ministry in this congregation. Mr. Knox died here 
on the 1st of April, 1746. The next minister was Mr. William 
Cochrane, who was ordained here on the 10th of May, 1748. 
In 1762 Mr. Cochrane resigned this charge, and conformed 
to the Established Church. He was succeeded by Mr. William 
Knox, who was installed here on the 18th of August, 
1765. Mr. Knox had previously been minister of Mary's 
Abbey, Dublin. Mr. Knox died here on the 29th of August, 
1801, and a stone inserted in a conspicuous position in the 
front wall of the j^lace of worship still bears honourable 
testimony to the excellence of his character. His descendants, 
in good worldly circumstances, are still to be found in the 
neighbourhood of Coleraine ; but with the exception of the 
family of the late Mr. Wark, of Castlerock, they no longer 
adhere to the Px'esbyterian Church. The next minister was 
Mr. Thomas Greer, who was ordained here on the 9th of 
March, 1802. Among his descendants are the Rev. Thomas 
Greer of Anahilt, and the late S. M. Greer, Esq., Recorder of 
Derry, and at one time M.P. for the county. Mr. Greer died 
on the 15th of December, 1812, and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Lyle, who was ordained here on the 7th of June, 
1814. Mr. Lyle died on the 3rd April, 1867, and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. John Mark, who was ordained here on the 
24th of July of the same year, 

DUNDALK. 

This congregation was established about 1706. The first 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 133 

minister was Mr. Jolm Wilson, who was ordained to the 
joint-charge of Dundalk and Carlingford about 1700. In 
1706, Dundalk was permitted to become a distinct congrega- 
tion, though the people could not pay to a minister above 
jei5 per annum. Thirty pounds were added out of the 
General Fund of the Synod to enable the people to support 
a minister. Mr. Patrick Simpson was accordingly ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Armagh on the 30th of December, 
1713. He resigned the charge in 1721, in consequence of 
insufficient maintenance, but was induced to resume it, and 
continue here some time longer. In 1725 he appears to have 
joined the Presbytery of Antrim, and he continued in con- 
nection with it till his death. The congregation then reverted 
to the Presbytery of Armagh, and by them Mr. Colin Lyndsay 
was ordained here on the 16th of August, 1779. His relation 
to this congregation was dissolved in 1785. The next 
minister was Mr. Andrew Bryson, who was ordained here on 
the 15th of August, 1786. He resigned this charge on the 
22nd of June, 1796; and was succeeded by Mr. William 
Neilson (afterwards D.D.), who was ordained here on the 21st 
December, 1796. Mr. Bryson died in the month of March 
following. Dr. Neilson, who was one of the most dis- 
tinguished linguists of his day, resigned this charge on 
the 2ord of July, 1818, and became Professor of Greek, 
Latin, and Hebrew in the Belfast Academical Institution. 
He died on the 27th of April, 1821. The next minister 
was Mr. David Davison, who was ordained here on the 
2nd of March, 1819. He resigned this charge on the 6th 
of April, 1825, and removed to the congregation of Old 
Jewry, London. The next minister was Mr. William Cun- 
ningham, son of Mr. Cunningham, minister of St. Johnstone, 
County Donegal, who was ordained here on the 23rd of June, 
1825. Mr. Cunningham was greatly beloved, but he was of 
a delicate constitution, and was not long able to perform 
the duties of the ministry. He died on the 15th of May, 
1829. Meanwhile Mr. James Beattie had been ordained his 
assistant and successor on the 25th of November, 1828. Mr. 
Beattie died on the 28th of December, 1851 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. W. M'Hinch, who was installed here on the 
15th of June, 1852. Mr. M'Hinch died on the 7th of 
January, 1860 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert Black, who 
was installed here on the 26th of June of the same year. 
Mr. Black, having obtained leave for his congregation to 



134 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

choose an assistant and successor, Mr. John Macmillan was 
installed here on the 19th of May, 1880. Mr. Black died in 
the summer of 1885. 

DIJNDONALD. 

The first minister here was Mr. Thomas Peebles. He 
came from Scotland in 1642, as chajjlain to Eglinton's 
regiment — at that time forming a part of the Scotch army 
that came over under Munroe. He was ordained at Dun- 
donald, then including Holywood, in 1645 ; and was Clerk to 
the Presbytery during his life. He died after various vicissi- 
tudes in 1670. He was succeeded by Mr. Gilbert Kennedy, 
who was minister here in 1673. His tomb-stone is in the 
churchyard in this parish. He was succeeded by Mr. Thomas 
Cobham, who was ordained here in 1678. He fled to Scotland 
during the troubles, and was absent nearly five years. He 
was here in 1690, and died in charge of Holywood alone, on 
the 24th of June, 1706, Holywood being now separated from 
it, and Kirk, or Dun-donald having become a distinct charge. 
In 1704 the people of Dundonald applied to the Synod of 
Ulster to be erected into a separate congregation, px'omising, 
by their commissioner, Mr. John M'Kittrick, c£20 jier annum, 
with 20 bolls of oats, and engaging also to provide a farm. 
The application was granted. They were not able for some 
time to obtain a minister. At length Mr. James Stewart was 
installed here by the Presbytery of Belfast, May 24th, 1709. 
He died in this charge, March 3rd, 1748. He was succeeded 
by Mr. James Hamilton, who was ordained here, October 15th, 
1754. He removed to Monaghan in the beginning of the year 
1768. Their next minister was Mr. William Ray, who was 
ordained here June 16th, 1761. He demitted his charge in 
February, 1765, and sailed for North America in the follow- 
ing May. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Smith, who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Bangor, June 3rd, 1766. 
He died in this charge, February 11th, 1771. Their next 
minister was Mr. James Caldwell, who was ordained here 1st 
September, 1772. Becoming infirm, Mr. William Pinlay was 
ordained his assistant and successor ISTovember 20th, 1810. 
Mr. Caldwell died October 2nd, 1814, leaving a widow. Mr. 
Pinlay died in this charge June 14th, 1834, aged 47, leaving 
a widow. The next minister was Mr. William Graham, who 
was ordained here on the 18th of August, 1835. On the 1st 
of November, 1842, Mr. Graham (afterwards D.D.), having 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 135 

been appointed a Jewish Missionary, resis^ned the charge, and 
on the 30th of May, 1843, Mr. E. T. Martin was ordained to 
the pastoral charge. Mr. Martin, having obtained leave for 
his congregation to choose an assistant and successor, Mr. 
James Bingham, formerly of Bandon, was installed here on 
the 22nd of March, 1883. 

DUKDROD. 

In 1827 the Presbytery of Templepatrick erected the 
inhabitants of this district into a separate congregation. The 
first minister was Mr. William Loughridge, who was ordained 
here on the 2nd of March, 1829. On the 6th of November, 
1837, he was suspended sine die. He was succeeded by Mr. 
William Magill, who was ordained here on the 14th of 
January, 184U. On the 1st of February, 1876, Mr. Magill 
retired from the active duties of the ministry ; and on the 
16th of May of the same year Mr. John Clarke was ordained 
to the pastoral charge. On the 26th of June, 1879, Mr. 
Clarke resigned the care of the congregation, and on the 11th 
of March, 1880, Mr. Magill died. On the 22nd of June, 1880, 
Mr. John M'Connell was installed as minister. Mr. M'Counell 
resigned this charge on the 14th of February, 1884, having 
received an appointment from the Board of Missions to New 
South Wales ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert M'Bride, 
who was settled here in April of the same year. 

DUNEAN. 

This congregation and Grange originally constituted one 
charge. We find Mr. Joseph Hamilton minister here in 
1670. In 1674 Mr. Wilson, who two years before had been 
ordained as minister of Randalstown, visited the place, and 
reported that " he found the preaching-house very incon- 
venient for the Grange, and yet the people of Dunean utterly 
unwilling to have a house accommodated to both places." 
Mr. Hamilton died in April, 1686. In June following, the 
people gave a call to Mr. Alexander M'Cracken, with bonds 
for =£26 per annum of stipend ; but he declined the charge, 
" particularly on the ground of the two meeting-houses to 
be here." In October, 1667, the people presented an unanimous 
call to Mr. James Scott, who had been entered on trials by 
the Presbytery in June, 1686, and licensed in February, 



136 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

1687. Before his ordination the Presbytery sent a minister 
to " endeavour to get a central meeting-place convenient for 
all, as but few attend when there is preaching in the Grange ;" 
but to this proposg^l the people in Grange would not agree. 
Mr. Scott was ordained June 19th, 1688, Mr. Munroe, of 
Cammoney, preaching and presiding on the occasion. His 
text was 1 Tim. iv. and last verse. He continued here till 
his death, November 11 th, 1710. In 1713 their commissioner, 
Major John Dobbin and others petitioned the Synod for 
assistance to support the Gospel among them, assigning as 
their reasons that several of their number had been removed 
by death, and that even before this they could not advance 
above =£22 or =£23 per annum. Their next minister was Mr. 
John Henderson, who was ordained here August 26th, 1713. 
He joined the Presbytery of Antrim in 1725, and died 
January, 1753. Mr. Robert Scott was ordained to the united 
congregations of Dunean and Grange on the 28th of June, 
1762. Becoming infirm, Mr. Henry Cooke (afterwards D.D. 
and LL.D.), who had been licensed by the Presbytery in 
July, 1807, was ordained as his assistant November 10th, 
1 808. He resigned this charge on his removal to Donegore 
on the 13th of March, 1810. He was succeeded by Mr, 
Matthew Elder, who was ordained here June 21st, 1811. He 
resigned his charge here on the 7th of January, 1817, and on 
the 18th of May following was suspended sine die. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Archibald Hutchinson, who was ordained 
here November 10th, 1818. Mr. Scott died April 17th, 1813, 
after an incumbency of 51 years, leaving neither widow nor 
family. Mr. Hutchinson died on the 4th of December, 1843 ; 
and on the 27th of August, 1844, Mr. William Denham, who 
had formerly been minister of Bovedy, was installed in 
Dunean. Mr, Denham died on the 14th of July, 1883 ; and 
was succeeded by Mr. John J. M'Clure, who was ordained 
here on the 2 7th November, 1883. 

DUNFANAGHT. 

DxJNFANAGHY and Kilmacrenan, in the County of Donegal, 
were long associated. The first minister in the joint charge 
would appear to have been Mr, Robert Drummond, son of 
Mr. Seth Drummond, of Ramelton. He was entered on trials 
by the Presbytery of Lagan in January, 1700, and licensed in 
Mav, He was ordained at Kilmacrenan on the 3rd of 



HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 137 

November, 1702, and died on tlie 8tli of June, 1712. The 
next notice we have o£ this joint charge is the ordination of 
Mr. James Cochran at Dunfanaghy, on the 20th of September, 
1715. He removed hence and was installed in Grejabbey, 
County Down, in June, 1736. We have not been able to 
ascertain the name of his immediate successor ; but Mr. 
David Allen was ordained here in August, 1775.* In May, 
1778, he was suspended shie die, but was restored in 1779. 
The same year the people of Kilmacrenan prayed to be erected 
into a distinct charge. On this occasion it appeared that for 
some time there had been preaching only at Kilmacrenan. 
Mr. Allen died as minister of the joint charge on the 9th of 
January, 1812, and was succeeded by his son, Mr. John 
Allen, who was ordained here on the 12th of March, 1812. 
In 1829 these congregations were divided, and Kilmacrenan, 
with .the Regium Donum, remained under the care of Mr. 
Allen. The first minister of Dunfanaghy in its separate state 
was Mr. David Eeid, who was ordained by the Presbytery of 
Letterkenny on the 21st January, 1830. Becoming infirm, 
Mr. Reid, in 1849, obtained leave for his congregation to 
choose an assistant ; and on the 19th of December of the same 
year Mr. Joseph Gallagher was ordained there. Mr. Eeid 
died on the 11th of July, 1860. On the 22nd of June, 1869, 
Mr. Gallagher resigned the pastoral charge; and on the 4th 
of August of the same year Mr. William Kane was ordained 
his assistant and successor. 



DTJNGANNON, 1st. 

The congregation of Dungannon was also known, at an 
early period, by the name of Donoughmore. Its first minister 
was Mr. Thomas Kennedy, who was deposed for non-conformity 
at the Restoration, and who afterwards preached at Carlan 
Bridge. In February, 1673, the people of Dungannon were re- 
commended by the Presbytery to adhere to their minister, Mr. 
George Keith, and to give him maintenance, otherwise it would 
be necessary for him to remove from them. Mr. Keith appears 
soon to have resigned the charge ; and after the Revolution 
we find Mr. Thomas Kennedy, sen., ministering to the con- 
gregation, which was now joined with Carlan. On the death 
of Mr. Kennedy, aged 89, in 1714; Dungannon was erected 

* About this time the family of Mr. Stewart of Ards was Presby- 
terian. 



138 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

into a separate charge. In April, 1718, Mr. Nathaniel 
Cochrane was ordained the minister. He died here in March, 
1735. A long vacancy seems to have now followed, as the 
next minister, Mr. Adam Duffiu, was not ordained till October 
10th, 1744. Mr. Duffin died in this charge September 14th, 
1770, leaving a widow and family. From this gentleman 
Charles Duffin, Esq., J.P., of Belfast, is collaterally descended. 
Mr. Duffin was succeeded by Mr. Alexander Mercer, who was 
ordained here December 22nd, 1772. Mr. Mercer demitted 
the charge in 1776, and removed to the neighboui-hood of 
Dublin. He was succeeded by Mr. William Stitt, formerly 
minister of Moira, who was installed here September 1st, 
1777. About this time the Volunteers made their appearance ; 
and on the 8th of September, 1783, one of the greatest 
political meetings ever held in Ulster assembled in the 
Presbyterian churcli of Dungannon. The Bishop of Derry 
and fifteen members of the Irish House of Commons were 
present on the occasion. On that day the Rev. Dr. Black, a 
distinguished minister, long connected with Derry, made a 
speech which electrified the auditory. During the course of 
the eighteenth century, the Synod of Ulster held its annual 
meeting no less than twenty-five times at Dungannon. Mr. 
Stitt died here September 1st, 1803, leaving a widow and 
family. The next minister was Mr. Thomas Waughope, who 
was ordained August 25th, 1804. He resigned the charge 
November 9th, 1805, and in the March following was sus- 
pended sine die by the Presbytery. He was succeeded by 
Mr. David Bennett, who was ordained June 7th, 1806. Mr. 
Bennett becoming infix'm, Mr. Charles L. Morell was ordained 
as his assistant on the 16th of September, 1844. Mr. Bennett 
died on 8th March, 1847. Mr. Morell (now D.D.), at length 
obtained as his assistant Mr. S. L. Wilson, who was ordained 
here on the 8th of April, 1879. On receiving a call from Cork 
in October, 1884, Mr. Wilson resigned this charge ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. David Wilson, formerly of Mourne, who 
was installed here in 1885. 

DUNLUCE. 

DuNLUCE was originally connected with Billy ; but, on the 
settlement of Mr. John Logue there, a party in Dunluce 
appear to have been dissatisfied. At length in 1753 the 
people of Dunluce, by their commissioners, Messrs. Hugh 
Boylan and Robert Patterson, supplicated the Synod of 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 139 

Ulster to erect tliem into a separate congregation, as they 
had built a new meeting-house ; but this was not granted 
on the first application. They were, however, erected at the 
next annual Synod, and their first minister was Mr. John 
Cameron, who was ordained here on the 3rd of June, 1755. 
Mr. Cameron was a man of talent and literary attainments, 
as several of his remaining works still testify ; but one of 
the Episcopalian ministers of the neighbourhood, with whom 
he was on habits of intimacy, seduced him into Unitarianism. 
In 1768 he was chosen Moderator of Synod. He died 
December 31st, 1799. He was succeeded by Mr. James 
Boyle, who was ordained here December 1st, 1801. In 1824 
Mr. Boyle reported to Synod various donations and legacies 
left to this congregation, which are detailed in the minutes 
of that year. Mr. Boyle died November 13th, 1835. The 
next minister was Mr. William Oliver, who was ordained 
here September 20th, 1836. Mr. Oliver is the author of 
several well-known and highly valued publications. Becom- 
ing blind, Mr. Oliver obtained leave for his congregation to 
elect an assistant and successor ; and, in consequence, Mr. 
James G. Kirkpatrick was ordained here on the 26th of 
September, 1865. 

DUNMUREY. 

This congregation was first erected between the years 1676 
and 1683. In January, 1683, Mr. Alexander Glass was the 
ordained minister. In February, 1683, he retired to Scotland 
in consequence of the disturbed state of the country, and re- 
mained there. In June, 1694, the Synod of Ulster wrote to 
him, requesting him to return, but without success. The 
next minister was Mr. John Malcome, who had been minister 
of Lower Killead; but he removed here about 1699. He died 
in this charge May 17th, 1729. Mr. Malcome was a man of 
superior talent, and in the Non-Subscription controversy took 
a prominent part in support of the Westminster Confession 
of Faith. He was succeeded by Mr. John Moorehead, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Templepatrick on the 
17th of February, 1731. He died in this charge June 20th, 
1768, leaving a widow and family ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
James Stoupe, formerly minister at Euniskillen, who was in- 
stalled here by the Presbytery of Bangor on the 3rd of June, 
1772. He resigned the charge in May, 1780, and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Robert Jackson, who was ordained here on the 



140 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

nth of April, 1782. He died September 5tli, 1788, leaving 
a widow and family. In 1790 we find the following entry in 
the minutes of the Synod of Ulster: — "Ordered that the 
Moderator write a letter to the Presbytery of Munster re- 
monstrating against the conduct of Mr, Blair (of the Leap), 
a member of their Presbytery, for irregularly introducing a 
probationer to Dunmurry, and afterwards presiding in draw- 
ing up a call for him — Eesolved, that we approve of the 
conduct of the Presbytery of Bangor respecting Dunmurry in 
deferring the ordination of Mr. Taggai't in that place until 
the matter might come before this body." Mr. Taggart and 
the congregation annexed themselves to the Presbytery of 
Antrim ; and on the 14th of May, 1805, his connection with 
this congregation was dissolved by them. The congregation 
reverted again to the Presbytery of Bangor in 1806 or 1807 ; 
and their next minister was Mr. Andrew George Malcom, who 
was ordained here on the 11th of March, 1807. He resigned 
this charge on the 11th of September, 1808, and removed to 
Newry. The next minister was Mr. Henry Montgomery 
(afterwards LL.D.), who was ordained September 14th, 1809. 
Dr. Montgomery was the great leader of the Arian party ; and 
in 1829 he and many of the members of the congregation 
seceded from the Synod of Ulster, retaining possession of the 
Church, Manse, and other properties. A few years after this 
secession, the congregation of Malone, in the neighbourhood 
of Dunmurry, was erected by the Synod of Ulster; and on the 
15th of February, 1837, Mr. Joseph Mackenzie was ordamed 
the pastor. The congregation of Dunmurry was subsequently 
erected by the General Assembly; and on the 21st of 
November, 1860, Mr. Eobert James Arnold was ordained 
pastor. 

ENNISEILLEN. 

The first minister of this congi'egation seems to have been 
Mr. James Tailzeur, or Taylor. He was here in 1677, and 
living within two miles of the town. He had come from the 
North of Scotland in 1675, recommended by Mr. Thomas 
Hogg, and in the month of September of that year was 
ordained to Monea, Enniskillen, and Den*yvallen. He appears 
to have left this shortly after 1681. His successor was Mr. 
Robert Kelso. Mr. Kelso had been ordained at Ealoo, in 
County Antrim, in May, 1673 ; but he demitted the charge 
in the following year, on account of the poverty of the people. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS, 141 

He then removed to Wicklow, where he was settled in 1675, 
and, after remaining a short time there, was called to 
Enniskillen. He was in this charge at the time of the 
Eevolution, in 1688, and died shortly after. In 1690, the 
congregation was vacant. In November, 1695, the Presbytery 
of Lagan met at Ballindreat, and ordained Mr. John 
M'Guachin minister of Enniskillen and Magherabuv. In 
1720, he complained to the Synod of his inadequate mainten- 
ance ; and, though the congregation were willing to secure to 
him d£32 per annum, he declared his inability to subsist on 
that stipend and do the duty of his congregation — some of 
his people being eight or ten miles distant from the meeting- 
house. The Synod, therefore, permitted him to resign the 
charge, and he was afterwards settled at Athy. He was 
succeeded by Mr. William Hair, who was installed here in 
the end of the year 1720. He had previously been minister 
at Corboy or Longford. He died in this charge, November 
29th, 1745, and was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Plunkett, son 
of Mr. Plunkett, of Glasslough, who was ordained here 
December 14th, 1748. He was removed to Strand Street, 
Dublin, in January, 1769. He was the father of the late 
Lord Chancellor Plunkett, and grandfather of the present 
Archbishop of Dublin. The next minister of the congregation 
was Mr. James Stoupe, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Monaghan, November 29th, 1769. In June, 
1772, he removed to Dunmurry. Mr. Stoupe was succeeded 
by Mr. David Young, On the day appointed for his ordin- 
ation, none of the Presbytery of Monaghan attended but one, 
who preached and performed all the duties, excei)t the formal 
act of ordination by prayer and the imposition of hands. 
The Synod rebuked the Presbytery for their non-attendance, 
and ordered the ordination to take place in the August 
following. In 1773, it was reported to the Synod that Mrs. 
Cranston, near Enniskillen, had bequeathed <£100 for the 
benefit of the minister there, that the money was in the hands 
of J. Armstrong, Esq., of Lisgool, the only surviving executor 
of her will, that the sum of £30, for the same purpose, was 
in the hands of the Eev. Mr. Plunkett, of Dublin, and that 
there was a third bequest of =£5 per annum, by Mr. Cranston, 
secured on certain lands, but the advantage of which neither 
the present minister nor any of his predecessors had enjoyed, 
though a lawsuit was commenced for the recovery of it, as it 
could not be carried on for want of j)roper support. In 1775, 



142 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

Mr, Young removed to Derry, and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Millar, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Monaghan, January 13th, 1776. He removed to Killeshandra, 
May 7th, 1781, and was succeeded by Mr. Joseph Denham, 
who was ordained here, December 11th, 1781. Mr. Denham 
was father of the late Eev. Dr. Denham, of Derry, and grand- 
father of the late Rev. J. S. Denham, of 2nd Holywood. Mr. 
Denham also removed to Killeshandra, where he was settled 
in September, 1799, and was succeeded in Enniskillen by Mr. 
Christopher Josias G-amble, who was ordained here December 
24th, 1799. He retired from the ministry in February, 1804. 
Their next minister was Mr. Ephraim Stevenson, who was 
ordained here July 10th, 1804. He resigned this charge in 
1835 ; and on the 1st of March, 1836, Mr. Thomas Berkeley 
was ordained his assistant and successor, Mr. Berkeley died 
of fever, December 8th, 1836, leaving a widow. He was 
succeeded by Mr. A. C. M'Clatchy, who was ordained here, 
August 29th, 1837. Mr. M'Clatchy died on the 1st of 
March, 1882 ; and was succeeded by Mr. S. C. Mitchell, who 
was ordained here on the 25th of October, 1882. 

ERVEY. 

Ervet and Carrickmaclim were originally united. They 
were known by the names of Breachy (or Banbreaky) and 
Kells. In 1700 the Presbytery of Tyrone was ordered to 
supply Breachy with preaching. In 1701 Kells was joined 
to it. In ] 702 Mr. Hugh Grier was their commissioner to the 
Synod. On the 12th of May, 1703, Mr. John Lee, formerly 
minister of Glenarm, was installed here on condition of 
receiving d£20 stipend for the first year, ^25 for the second, 
d£30 for the third ; and to get out of the Begiuvi Domim 
Fund <£20 for the first, £15 for the second, and .£10 for the 
third year. After the Presbytery and Synod had made many 
ineffectual attempts to secure his maintenance, he was at 
length, in July, 1710, loosed from this charge. He died 
October 29th, 1717. The next minister was Mr. William 
Patton, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Longford 
on the 7th of December, 1721. In July, 1736, he removed 
to Lisburn ; and was succeeded by Mr. David Hutchinson, 
who was ordained to this charge on the 20th of November, 
1739. In 1744 he removed to Monaghan. The next minister 
was Mr. William Fleming, who was ordained here August 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 143 

3rd, 1748. In 1767 lie removed to Corboy ; and on the 22nd 
of June, 1768, Mr. William Moore was ordained here. Mr. 
Moore died on the 27th of June, 1811 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Robert Winning, who was ordained here on the 9th 
of June, 1812. Carrickmaclim was separated from Ervey in 
1832, and Mr. Winning remained minister of Ervey. To- 
wards the close of the year 1842, Mr. Winning conformed to 
Prelacy,* having obtained the promise of a living in the 
Established Church ; but his people declined to follow him. 
On the 22nd of June, 1843, Mr. James Armstrong was 
ordained to the pastoral charge. On the 28th of November, 
1861, Mr. Armstrong resigned the pastoral care ; and on the 
4th of June, 1863, Mr. John Wilson was ordained here. 

PAH AN. 

This congregation was formerly connected with Buncrana. 
The first minister of whom we have any account was Mr. 
Ninian Cochrane, who was ordained here on the 3rd of 
Pebruary, 1719. He demitted the charge in 1748, and was 
succeeded by Mr. Joseph Eeagh, who was ordained here in 
August of that year. Mr. Cochrane died on the 21st of 
September, 1751. Mr. Eeagh demitted the charge and 
emigrated to America in 1770. Mr, John Erwin was ordained 
here in September, 1777; but resigned the charge through 
bodily indisposition on the 22nd of February, 1796, and was 
succeeded by Mr. David Hamilton, who was ordained here on 
the 3rd of September, 1799. Mr. Erwin was deposed in 
1801, for celebrating marriages ii-regularly. In October, 
1834, the Presbytery dissolved the connection between Pahan 
and Buncrana ; and while the former continued under the 
care of Mr. Hamilton the latter was erected into a separate 
congregation. Mr. Hamilton died on the 31st of October, 
1840 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John Macky, who was 
ordained here on the 7th of June, 1842. On the 5th of April, 
1854, Mr. Macky resigned this charge, having been appointed 
by the directors of the Colonial Mission to go out to New 
Zealand. He was succeeded by Mr. David Hanson, who was 
installed here on the 12th of September, 1854. Mr. Hanson 
resigned the charge on the 23rd of August, 1860 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. John Brown M'Bride, who was ordained 
on the 27th of December of the same year. 

* He had bpen Ions; before virtually in the pay of the Established 
Church as an agent of the Irish Society. 



144 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

FAKNET. 

This congregation was known at first by the name of 
Clondevadock. It was originally associated with Eamullan. 
The first minister of the joint charge was Mr. Adam White. 
He was ordained here in 1654. In August, 1672, the con- 
gregation was found to be unable to support him. Major 
Alexander Stewart came as commissioner to the Presbytery, 
wishing him to be continued in the charge ; but in September 
of that year the Presbytery released him from it. He after- 
wards settled at Ardstraw ; and after the Eevolutiou became 
minister of Billy, in County Antrim. Fannet continued to 
be only occasionally supplied for a length of time ; but on the 
25th of February, 1708, Mr. Charles Lynn was ordained the 
minister. In 1728, he removed to the 2nd congregation of 
Coleraiue. He was succeeded in Fannet by Mr. John 
M'Gachin, who was ordained here by the Px'esbytery of 
Letterkenny on the 1st of April, 1730. He died in this 
charge in April, 1783, leaving a widow and family. The next 
minister was Mr. James Delap. He was ordained as Mr. 
M'Gachin's assistant on the 14th of November, 1782. He 
was suspended sine die, by the Presbytery on the 19th of 
November, 1806. The next minister was Mr. James Marshall, 
who was ordained on the 17th of February, 1808. Mr. 
Marshall died on the 1st of December, 1826, leaving a widow 
and family. He was succeeded by Mr. James Budd, who was 
ordained here on the 17th of October, 1827. On the 20th of 
April, 1837, Mr. Budd resigned this charge and removed to 
Clady. He was succeeded by Mr. Moses Houston, who was 
ordained here on the 21st of December, 1837. On the lOth 
of March, 1841, Mr. Houston resigned the charge of this con- 
gregation and removed to Letterkenny. In the same year 
Mr. Patrick Hay was ordained in Fannet. On the 15th of 
April, 1857, Mr. Hay resigned the pastoral charge. He was 
succeeded by Mr. James Keating, who was ordained here on 
the 17th of March, 1850. 

FAUGHANVALE. 

This was originally called the congregation of Muff. It 
formed part of Glen derm ot congregation in 1696. In 1730 
the people presented a memorial praying to be speedily 
planted with a minister. Their first minister is said to have 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 145 

been Mr. James Smyth, who was ordained by the Presbytery 
of Strabane in 1732. He died here on the 13th of February, 
1770. He was succeeded by Mr. Dunn, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Derry, on the 18th of June, 1771. 
He was deposed by the same Presbytery on the 18th of May, 
1784. The next minister was Mr. Henry Elder, who was 
ordained here on the 4th of February, 1786. He died in this 
charge on the 27th of July, 1817 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
Marshall Moore, who was ordained here in the month of 
November, 1819. Mr. Moore died on the 14th of August, 
1848 ; and on the 26th of March, 1850, Mr. Lowry E. Berkeley 
was ordained to the pastoral charge. On the 25th of August, 
1858, Mr. Berkeley resigned this charge on his removal to 
Lurgan; and on the 17th of February, 1859, Mr. Francis 
Petticrew (now D.Lit.) was ordained to the pastorate. 

FINTONA. 

This congregation was first known by the name of G-olan. 
Its first minister was Mr. Robert Coleheart. He was here in 
1704, and died on the 26th of January, 1730. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Nathaniel Gi-lasgow, who had been ordained 
to go to America on the 3rd of February, 1719, but who 
was installed here on the 5th of April, 1732. He had mean- 
while been in another congregation, probably Ballyjamesduff. 
He died in this charge in April, 1743. The next minister 
was Mr. William Moorehead, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Monaghan on the 26th of September, 1752. 
He died here September 15th, 1806. In 1834 Dromore was 
separated from Fintona. Meanwhile Mr. John Sampson had 
been ordained to the united charge on the 16th of September, 
1808. In 1835 Mr. Sampson was required by the Synod to 
resign the pastoral charge. On the 4th of April, 1836, Mr. 
Robert Chambers was ordained his assistant. Meanwhile 
Mr. James Reid Dill was ordained as the minister of the 
separated congregation of Dromore on the 10th of November, 
1835. A story has been often told to the effect that the Rev. 
Philip Skelton, when rector of Fintona, once preached in the 
Presbyterian meeting-house so much to the delight of the 
congregation that the people all joined the Established 
Church, and that Mr. Skelton paid to the minister ever 
afterwards d£40 a- year, being the amount of his stipend, as a 
compensation for the loss of his income. But this is 



146 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

obviously a misstatement. The same minister had the care 
of the congregation of Tintona during the whole time that 
Mr. Skelton was rector, as well as for many years after his 
removal, and there is documentary evidence that the stipend 
still amounted to £S5. Mr. Chambers becoming infirm, Mr. 
George P. M'Kay was ordained here as his assistant and 
successor on the 17th February, 1874. Mr. Chambers died 
on the 29th of July, 1879. 

FINVOY. 

FiNVOT congregation originated with a Captain G-alland, 
one of Cromwell's officers, who had obtained part of the 
property of the M'Quillans in that parish. A portion of 
these lands was secured by a Colonel Hamilton, of the Dun- 
nemana family, at Ballynegawey, in the parish of Finvoy, 
who also encouraged the settlement of a minister there. The 
first minister is said to have been Mr. Robert Henry, who 
was here about the time of the Revolution. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Robert Haltridge, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Route in 1702. He died in this charge, 
December 22nd, 1727; and was succeeded by Mr. David 
Smylie, who was ordained here in 1734. He removed to 
Maghera in 1738. The next minister was Mr. Gideon Nelson, 
who was ordained here, November 9th, 1742. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. James Elder was ordained as his assistant and 
successor on the 13th of June, 1780. Mr. Nelson died on 
the 20th of November, 1783. Mr. Elder died on the 4th of 
November, 1843, in the 86th year of his age and the 64th 
of his ministry. He was long the father of the Synod of 
Ulster, and was noted for his steadfast orthodoxy. On the 
8th of August, 1843, Mr. Andrew Todd was ordained as his 
assistant and successor. 

GALWAY. 

The first pastor who ministered to this congregation was 
Mr. William Bigger of Limerick, who preached in 1698, and 
was imprisoned in consequence. Mr. Thomas Hooks was 
ordained in 1702. At that time the ministers of Dublin 
requested the Synod of Ulster to allow .£10 towards his 
maintenance. This grant was not regularly paid, and Mr. 
Hooks removed to Dublin. The next minister was Mr. 
Nathaniel Orr, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Down on the 2nd of December, 1707. He demitted this 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 147 

charge in 1710; and was succeeded by Mr. Alexander 
Hamilton, "vrho was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Monaghan on the 23rd of March, 1714. The people sent as 
commissioners to the Synod, after the resignation of Mr. Orr, 
Messrs. Evan Tyler, Jo. Dingwall, and Francis Montgomery. 
In 1722 Mr. Hamilton demitted the charge, there not being 
above eight or ten families belonging to the congregation, 
and these not able to pay the rent of the meeting-house. * 
The congregation was revived by the Synod of Ulster in 1833, 
and after having been supplied for some time by the Synods' 
Mission, Mr. Joseph Fisher was ordained here as fixed pastor 
on the 3rd of June, 1835. In February, 1845, Mr. Fisher 
resigned the pastoral charge and removed to England. On 
the 28th of January, 1846, Mr. William Adair was ordained 
to the pastoral charge. According to the last returns the con- 
gregation consists of 49 families, paying a stipend of d8120. 
Mr. Adair becoming infirm. Dr. W. Ross Hamilton, formerly 
of Ballygawley, was installed here on the 2nd of April, 1872. 
Dr. Hamilton died on the 27th of July, 1873 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. John C. Moore, who was installed here on the 
21st of April, 1875. Mr. Moore, on his removal to Connor, 
resigned this charge on the 3rd of May, 1879 ; and was 
succeeded by Dr. J. G. Eobb, who was installed here on the 
4th of March of the same year. Mr. Adair died on the 13th 
of April, 1882. Dr. Eobb died on the 8th of November, 
1881 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John C. Clarke, who was 
installed here on the 4th of April, 1882. 

GAEVAGH 1st. 

Mr. Law was minister here in 1660. In 1671 he was con- 
nected with the Presbytery of Antrim ; but he seems to have 
soon afterwards joined the Eoute Presbytery. In February, 
1673, it was agreed by the several Presbyteries that Eoute 
may declare the congregation vacant, as Mr. Law had 
demitted the charge, and there was no hope of his returning 
to it. Mr. Eobert Landish or Landess, who was ordained by 
the Eoute Presbytery in January, 1674, appears to have been 
his successor. Mr. Landish removed to Scotland at the 
Eevolution, In 1691 the Synod wrote to him to return to 
his charge ; but without effect ; as he became minister of 

* About this time a Koman Catholic bishop was set up iu Galway. 
The people had before been under the care of a warden. 



148 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

Blantyre. We hear nothing more of the congregation till 
1700, when we find Mr. James Woodside minister here. He 
died or resigned in 1719. He was succeeded by Mr. Francis 
Eoss, who was ordained here on the 7th of May, 1723. He 
died in this charge on the 4th of March, 1751. In 1756 the 
people gave a call to Mr. William Callender, minister of a 
new erection at Ardstraw. Mr. Callender accepted the call, 
and brought his credentials to the Presbytery ; but on the 
day of his installation he did not appear, as he had meanwhile 
been induced to return to his former place. At length Mr. 
Eobert Elder was ordained here in 1761. He died in this 
charge on the 18th of May, 1781. After much disputation, 
Mr. Brice Millar was ordained here on the 21st of December, 
1784 ; but he soon afterwards went to America. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Henry Henry, who was ordained here on 
the 13th of May, 1788. Mr. Henry removed to Connor in 
the December following. He was succeeded by Mr. Gideon 
M'Mullan, who was ordained here in February, 1790. He 
died in February, 1793. The next minister was Mr. James 
Brown, who was ordained hereon the 1st of December, 1795. 
Becoming infirm, he resigned the charge ; and Mr. James 
Millar was ordained his assistant and successor on the 18th 
of February, 1840. Mr. Brown died on the 20th of May, 
1850, in the 88th year of his age and the 55th of his ministry. 
Mr. Millar died on the 19th of November, 1859. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Thomas Davidson, who was ordained here 
on the 25th of September, 1860. Mr. Davidson died on the 
2nd of August, 1865. He was succeeded by Mr. Thomas 
Madill (now LL.D), who was ordained here on the 21st of 
February, 1866. 

GLASTRT. 

This congregation was originally known as Ballyhalbert, 
and was annexed to Ballywalter. It was erected into a 
separate charge about 1720; and its first minister was Mr. 
John M'Murray, who was ordained here on the 28th of 
December, 1725. He died in this charge in 1750. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Thomas Scott, who was ordained here on 
the 14th of June, 1732. He died in April, 1770. He was 
succeeded by Mr. William Steel Dickson, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Killyleagh on the 6th of March, 
1771. He resigned this charge on the 1st of February, 1780, 
and removed to Portaferry. He was succeeded by Mr. James 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS, 149 

Sinclair, wlio was ordained here by the Presbytery of Killy- 
leagh on the 3rd of October, 1781. Mr. Sinclair having 
resigned the charge through age and infirmity, Mr. Alexander 
P. Gondy, son of the late Eev. Andrew Goudy, of Bally waiter, 
■was ordained here on the 20th of September, 1832. Mr. 
Goudy resigned this charge in the Spring of 1833, and 
removed to Strabane. The next minister was Mr. John 
M'Roberts, who was ordained here on the 8th of June, 1834. 
Mr. M'Roberts died on the 17th of April, 1838 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Gilbert Jamieson, who was ordained here as 
assistant and successor to Mr. Sinclair on the 29th of 
January, 1839. Mr. Sinclair died on the 15th of June, 1841, 
aged 85. Mr. Jamieson having resigned the pastoral charge, 
Mr. Robert "Woi-kman was ordained as his successor on the 
3rd of September, 1872, Mr. Jamieson died on the 29th of 
December, 1879. 

GLENARM. 

Glenarm is famous as the place where the celebrated 
Robert Blair landed on his arrival in Ireland before his 
settlement in Bangor. It is probable that there were some 
Scotch Presbyterians here at a very early period ; but the 
first minister of whom we read, as located in it, is Mr. 
Alexander Gilbert, who was ordained in Glenarm on the 2nd 
of May, 1655. His continuance in the charge was very brief, 
as the place was vacant in January, 1656. Mr. James 
Fleming, who was ordained here in June, 1658, was ejected 
on the re-establishment of Prelacy in 1661 ; but he conformed 
to the Episcopal Church shortly afterwards. In July, 1671, 
the people presented a call to Mr. John Anderson, an ordained 
minister, who had fled from Scotland. He accepted the call 
with a reservation of liberty to return to Scotland when a 
door might be opened. In January, 1674, Mr. John 
Abernethy appeared as their commissioner before the Presby- 
tery, and stated that the congregation paid Mr. Anderson 
.£30 per annum — " the usual allowance to ministers in the 
country" — and that they were not much in arrear to him. 
In October, 1685, Mr. Anderson was removed to Antrim — 
his arrears on leaving Glenarm being upwards of =£120. In 
July, 1686, the people presented a call to Mr. Hugh Crawford. 
Their commissioners on this occasion were Messrs. Henry 
Mitchell and Henry Dunn, who promised only ^£20 per 
annum. This call the Presbytery sent back, to be signed by 



150 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS, 

Mr. DoBaldson, as being most forward for Mr. Crawford's 
settlement ; and it is reported to the Presbytery in January, 

1687, that Mr. John Donaldson and his eldest son had both 
subscribed it. The Donaldsons are said at that time to have 
been a family of note, and the remains of their castle were, 
until recently, pointed out in that locality. In February, 

1688, Mr. Crawford went to Scotland — having been previously 
an ordained minister there — and about this time received a 
call from his former congregation in that kingdom. In 
September, 1688, the people presented a call to Mr. John 
Darragh — and Layd and Cushendall joined with Grlenarm in 
this call — seeking preaching every fourth Sabbath from Mr. 
Darragh, as he had the Irish tongue.* The Presbytery 
appointed him to bring testimonials from Scotland and 
liberty from the Church there to settle in Ireland. In 
January, 1689, he accordingly produced testimonials from 
the Presbytery of Kintyre ; but the troubles of the Revolution 
coming on, he retired to Scotland, and the congregation 
remained vacant. In April, 1691, the people gave a call to 
Mr. Peter Orr, of Clough, but the Presbytery of Route would 
not permit his removal. They at last obtained Mr. John 
Lee, who had been licensed by the Presbytery of Antrim in 
February, 1688, and who was ordained here in 1693. In 
1703 he is declared transportable — that is, entitled to a 
removal — for what reason we do not know, but probably on 
account of inadequate maintenance. There was much difficulty 
in obtaining his arrears from Glenarm. They owed him £69, 
and the Synod required them to pay him d£40 by instalments ; 
but there was great altercation about the settlement of 
accounts. He removed to Kingscourt, The congregation 
did not obtain a minister till 1709, when Mr. James Creighton 
was ordained here on the 24th of May of that year. He died 
in this charge July 20th, 1731. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Thomas Brown, who was ordained here June 19th, 1732. On 
the night of November 17th, 1754, Mr. Brown, when turning 
to go over the bridge at Glenarm, fell into the river and was 
drowned, and his body was found next morning. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Thomas Reid, who was ordained here in 
March, 1756. He at length demitted the charge through 
infirmity, and Mr. Robert Acheson was ordained his assistant 
on the 17th of July, 1792. In June, 1799, he was removed 
to Donegall Street Congregation, Belfast. The next minister 

* The Irish tongue is still spoken by many in this neighbourhood. 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 151 

was Mr. Alexander Montgomery, wlio was ordained March 
17th, 1801. Mr. Reid died February 25th, 1814, leaving 
neither widow nor family. At the time of the Unitarian 
Secession, in 1829, Mr. Montgomery and a part of the con- 
gregation left the Synod of Ulster and retained possession of 
the meeting-house. The congregation was soon after annexed 
to the Presbytery of Ballymena, and their next minister was 
Mr. Hugh VVaddell, who was ordained here on the 24th of 
September, 1833. Mr. Waddell becoming infirm, Mr. James 
Scott was ordained here on the 28th of September, 1869. 
Mr. Waddell died on the 27th of August, 1873. Mr. Scott, 
on his removal to Banbridge, resigned this charge on the 
21st of September, 1880 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Charles 
M. Cowden, who was installed here on the 19th of Julv, 
1881. •" 

GLENDERMOT 1st. 

The first minister of Glendermot, then including Cumber 
and Faughanvale, was Mr. John WooU or Will, who was 
ordained here in 1654. In 1679, he became infirm, and his 
session having substantiated against him several charges of 
unseemly carriage, he was advised by the Presbytery to resign, 
which he did accordingly. His successor was Mr. James 
Gordon, so well known in connection with the seige of Derry. 
He it was who advised the apprentice boys to shut the gates, 
and who afterwards urged Kirk to attempt the breaking 
of the boom. In the Presbytery book of that period Adam 
Murray is returned as the elder for Glendermot, and there is 
every reason to believe that he is the Colonel Adam Murray 
who was the true hero of the seige of Derry.* Mr. Gordon, 
as is well known, was on very intimate terms with him, and 
in co-operation with his minister, he took the bold stand 
which compelled Lundy to make his escape out of the city. 
Colonel Murray is interred in the graveyard of Glendermot. 
Mr. Gordon went to Scotland about the time of the Revolution, 
where he remained until immediately before the period of the 
breaking of the boom. In January, 1692, he demitted the 
charge of the congregation of Glendermot by letter addressed 
to the Presbytery of Lagan. He had for some time before 
been ministering to the congregation of Cardross in Scotland, 

* A manuscript history of the Irish Presbyterian Church, by the 
celebrated Rev. Dr. Campbell, attests the Presbyterianisni of Colonel 
Murray. Dr. Campbell had the best means of ascertaining the fact. 



152 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

where he settled, and remained till his death. He was suc- 
ceeded in Glendermot by Mr. John Harvey, who came from 
the Presbytery of Dumfries in May, 1695. He had previously 
been minister of New Abbey in Scotland. In December, 1695, 
the congregation supplicated the Presbytery for the settle- 
ment of Mr. Harvey, promising <£40 per annum, and some 
corn, also to build him a dwelling-house and to keep up the 
aforesaid salary, though Cumber and Muff should fall off and 
not join with them. He was accordingly installed as minister 
in March, 1696. His son, Mr. David Harvey was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Derry, as assistant and successor 
to his father, March 23rd, 1731. In 1737 he was removed to 
Derry; and his father died on the 20th of August, 1739. 
During the subsequent vacancy great dissensions prevailed in 
the congx-egation. At length Mr. William Hare was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Derry, March 1st, 1743. He died 
in 1767, leaving a widow and family, and was succeeded by 
Mr. James Knox, who was ordained here May 1st, 1770. He 
demitted the charge in consequence of bodily infirmity in 
August, 1798. The next minister was Mr. William Monteith 
who was ordained here December 2nd, 1800. Mr. Knox died 
November 21st, 1813, leaving neither widow nor family. 
Mr. Monteith becoming infirm, Mr. Alexander Buchanan was 
ordained his assistant and successor on the 16th June, 1842. 
Mr. Monteith died on the 8th of February, 1849. Mr. 
Buchanan died on the 31st of October, 1871 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Thomas Thompson who was ordained here on 
the 16th of January, 1872. 

GLENDERMOT 2nd. 

This congregation was erected in 1743, and annexed for a 
time to the Presbytery of Route, which installed here Mr. 
John Holmes, formerly minister of Donegall, on the 19th of 
April, 1744. The congregation was subsequently annexed to 
the Presbytery of Letterkenny. Mr. Holmes died on the 
15th of May, 1773, leaving no family, and was succeeded by 
Mr. Henry Miller, who was ordained here in May, 1776. 
Mr. Miller becoming infirm, Mr. Henry Carson was ordained 
his assistant and successor, March 12th, 1815. In April, 
1820, Mr. Miller was suspended for the irregular celebration 
of marriage. He died January 1st, 1821, leaving a family. 
Mr. Carson becoming infirm, Mr. Marshall Moore* was 
* He was Bon of the minister of Faughanvale. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 153 

ordained his assistant and successor on the 3rd of April, 
1855. Mr. Moore died on the 4th of January, 1860 ; and on 
the 27th of September of the same year the Eev. Joseph 
■Corkey (now LL.D.) was ordained his successor. 

GLENN AN. 

This congregation has been also known by the name of 
•Glasslough. Its first minister was Mr. Thomas Gowan, who 
was born at Caldermuir, in Scotland, in 1631, and came to 
Ireland about 1650. When he settled here he was the only 
Protestant minister in the parish. He preached in the 
church and enjoyed the tithes. At the Eestoration he was 
deposed, and he then removed to Antrim. The congregation 
now continued vacant and unplanted for some time. In 
1673 the people called Mr. Robert Henry ; but the Presby- 
tery of Ajitrim settled him at Carrickfergus. Their com- 
jnissioner on that occasion to the Presbytery of Antrim was 
Mr. Charles Caldwell. It does not appear that from this 
date they enjoyed a settled minister, but were united to the 
congregation of Kinnaird — now Minterburn. In 1713 the 
people petitioned the Synod to be erected into a distinct 
congregation. Their commissioners were Messrs. William 
Johnson of Tully, Henry Gillespie, James Widney, and John 
Stewart. Their desire was carried into effect, and sanctioned 
by the Synod in 1714, when it was stated that " all within 
the County of Monaghan towards Cur-bridge were to be 
members of this congregation," which was then indis- 
criminately called Treugh or Scarnagiroch. They soon after 
obtained a stated pastor, as Patrick Plunket was ordained 
here on the 11th of May, 1715. Mr. Plunket growing infirm, 
Mr. Samuel Kennedy was ordained here in October, 1757. 
Mr. Plunket died in 1760, and Mr. Kennedy also departed 
this life on the 7th of May, 1781. The next minister was 
Mr. John M'Curdy, who was ordained here on the 18th of 
October, 1783. Becoming infirm, Mr. William Smyth was 
ordained his assistant and successor on the 27th of November, 
1820. Mr. M'Curdy died on the L9th of February, 1823. 
In 1846 Mr. Smyth applied for leave to his congregation to 
choose an assistant and successor ; and on the 13th of May, 
1847, Mr. James M. Field was ordained here. Mr. Field 
died on the 20th of January, 1855 ; and on the 28th of June, 
1856, Mr. Robert Wallace, who had previously been minister 



154 HISTORY OF CONGBEGATIONS. 

of Scotstown, was installed in Glennan, Mr. Wallace 
resigned this charge on the 24th of September, 1861, having 
accepted a call from the congregation of Athy ; and on the 
28th of May, 1862, Mr. John Davidson was ordained to the 
pastoral charge. 

GLENWHEEEY. 

As early as 1672 the inhabitants of Grlenwherry applied to 
the Presbytery for preaching ; but the country was then very 
sparsely inhabited, and it does not appear that they obtained 
any regular supply of ordinances. Shortly after that date, 
when Peden, the famous Scotch field preacher, was obliged 
to make his escape from Scotland, he found refuge in Grlen- 
wherry. The tradition is that he appeared in the country in 
the dress of a labouring man, and engaged himself to a 
farmer at a place still known as Shoptown, to thrash oats. 
His real character was soon discovered, for his constant 
prayerfulness did not escape the notice of the family, and he 
then confessed that he was the persecuted evangelist. He 
remained for some time in the country ; and often preached 
to crowded audiences in private houses and in the open air. 
About the same time Willie Gilliland, the hero of Sir 
Samuel Ferguson's beautiful poem of that name, appeared 
in Glenwherry. He was a Scottish gentleman who was 
obliged to leave his native country about the time of the 
battle of Bothwell Bridge. He found shelter at the Collin, 
where Mr. Arthur Allen, an elder of the Presbyterian Church, 
and one of his descendants, now inhei'its a valuable estate. 
He had two sons, one of whom lived at Collin, and another 
at Tildarg, about two miles distant. From Willie Gilliland 
many respectable families in the North of Ireland are des- 
cended. Glenwherry long remained without a minister ; 
some of the people attending worshij) at the Braid, some at 
Connor, and some at Ballyeaston ; but at length in 1823 the 
inhabitants applied to the Synod of Ulster, and were erected 
into a separate congregation. Their first minister was Mr. 
John Montgomery, who was ordained here by the Presbytery 
of Ballymena on the 6th of September, 1825. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. Eobert Jeffrey was ordained as his assistant on 
the 22nd of December, 1868. Mr. Montgomery died on the 
22nd of July, 1869. Mr. Jeffrey resigned his charge of the 
congregation on the 23rd of January, 1873, and removed to 
Greyabbey. He was succeeded by Mr. James Morell, who 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 155 

■was ordained here on the 3rd of March, 1874. Mr. Morell 
resigned this charge on the 1st of February, 1881, on his 
removal to Eathf riland ; and was succeeded by Mr. Hamilton 
Moore, who was ordained here on the 1st of November, 1881. 

GRANGE. 

In the Grange, a district in the neighbourhood of Bally- 
mena and Randalstown, the Quakers had one of their earliest 
settlements in Ireland. A Presbyterian congregation was 
also established here in the seventeenth centux-y. It was 
originally associated with the congregation of Duuean. The 
two congregations had alternate supplies of preaching. This 
state of things was unsatisfactory ; and a proposal was made 
that a meeting-house should be erected on some central spot, 
to which all could resort, and thus have public ordinances 
every Lord's day. But they could not agree to such a settle- 
ment. The following is one of several minutes relative to 
this subject: — "May 1st, 1688. — Mr. David Cunningham 
spoke to Mr. Dalway about the privilege of Grange, who 
declares that their privilege is of no weight to hinder their 
joining with Dunean in one meeting-place. On this, James 
Stuart, from Grange, declares they resolve to have a separate 
meeting-house, notwithstanding all that has been said. The 
meeting desired Mr. Elias Travers to speak to the Lord or 
Lady Massereene as to their mind on it." Again : — " As to 
the place of the meeting-house, they declare Dunean and 
Grange cannot be united, which is also the mind of my Lord 
Massereene, reported by Elias Travers ; but both parties 
agree that both the meeting-houses be erected as near the 
march of Dunean and Grange as can be." Mr. Elias Travers, 
who is here mentioned, was chaplain to Lord Massereene. 
He was nephew to Lord Radnor, better known as Lord 
Roberts, who, in 1669, was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Mr. 
Travers could not conform to Prelacy, and became a Presby- 
terian minister. After the Revolution he settled in Dublin 
as minister of Cork Street congregation, and officiated there 
till his death in 1705. The Massereene family at this time 
took much interest in the affairs of the Presbyterian Church, 
and Lady Massereene seems to have been a Presbyterian. 
As the Massereene property was in the neighbourhood of 
Grange, we can well understand why Mr. Elias Travers, Lord 
Massereene' s chaplain, and himself a Presbyterian minister, 



156 HISTOET OP CONGREGATIONS. 

took SO inucli trouble in endeavouring to arrange the site of 
the Grange meeting-house. Mr. Dalwaj, ancestor of Marriott 
Dalway, Esq., formerly M.P. for Carrickfergus, was a member 
of the Presbyterian Church. He was a man of influence in 
the county, and perhaps had some property in the district 
where the dispute was going on. The two congregations of 
Dunean and Grange remained united ; but the association 
was found to be very inconvenient. In 1733 the people of 
Grange complained that Mr. Henderson, the minister of 
Dunean, had given up the charge of them. He had joined 
the Presbytery of Antrim in 1725. The Presbyterians of the 
district were now for a considerable time without a stated 
ministry. At length, on the 4th of June, 1745, Mr. Francis 
O'Bryan was ordained here. He demitted the charge in 
1752, and died on the 30th of June, 1753. The congregation 
was again annexed to Dunean ; and Mr. Robert Scott was 
ordained to the united charge on the 28th of June, 1762. 
Shortly after the death of Mr. Scott the union was again 
dissolved. In 1820 the people sought to be erected into a 
separate congregation ; and the Presbytery of Ballymena 
was ordered to supj^ly them with preaching. In the following 
year they were recognised by the Synod as a distinct charge. 
They then stated that they had their meeting-house in good 
order, and that they would engage to pay an annual stipend 
of d£54. Their first minister in this separate state was Mr. 
Robert Rusk, who was ordained here on the 23rd of March, 
1824. Mr. Rusk died here on the 25th of July, 1841. He 
was succeeded by Mr. Hall Stewart, who was ordained here 
on the 21st of July, 1842. Becoming infirm Mr. Stewart 
retired from the active duties of the ministry in August, 
1881, and was succeeded by the Rev. Robert Erwin, formerly 
of Caledon, who was installed here on the 3rd January, 1882. 

GREYABBEY. 

The earliest minister here was Mr. Fergus Alexander. He 
was imprisoned by Venables in 1650 ; but he had either left 
the country at the subsequent severities of the Republican 
party, or had died before 1660, as we do not find him then in 
the country. The people then joined the congregation of 
Bally waiter. In 1731 the people of Greyabbey, by their 
commissioners, Messrs. Rowan and Ferdinand Baillie, sup- 
plicated to be erected into a separate congregation, which 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 157 

was opposed by Bally waiter, and for a time deferred. It was 
ordered that Mr. Goudy, of Ballywalter, supply here every 
fourth Sabbath, they paying annually to him £,7 10s., with 
meal and turf as usual. At the death of Mr. Groudy they 
were erected into a distinct congregation by the Synod in 
1773, on their promise of d830 per annum and £,10 worth of 
victual and turf. Captain Montgomery became security for 
this sum. Their first minister was Mr. James Cochran, 
formerly minister at Dunfanaghy, who was installed here 
June 9th, 1736. He died in this charge in the end of March, 
1739; and was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Dickson, who was 
ordained here by the Pi'esbytery of Bangor January 13th, 
1742. Mr. Dickson died 18th May, 1771, leaving a widow 
and family ; and was succeeded hj Mr. Samuel Martin 
Stephenson, who was ordained here June 20th, 1774. He 
demitted this charge August 1st, 1785 ; and having obtained 
the degree of M.D., settled in Belfast as a physician, where 
he attained high distinction in his profession. He was the 
father of the late Dr. Stephenson, of Belfast. He was suc- 
ceeded in Greyabbey by Mr. James Porter, who was ordained 
here July 31st, 1787. On the 2nd of July, 1798, Mr. Porter 
was executed on a rising ground in the immediate vicinity of 
his own house for his complicity in the rebellion. He was the 
only ordained minister connected with the Presbyterian 
Church in Ireland who suffered capitally at that time for 
treason. He wrote a famous pamphlet called " Billy Bluff 
and the Squire." Billy Bluff was Billy Lowry, a small 
farmer near Greyabbey, who was the bailiff of the estate ; 
and the squire was Squire Montgomery of Greyabbey. The 
next minister was Mr. John Watson, who was ordained here 
September 3rd, 1799. In 1829 Mr. Watson and a part of 
the congregation seceded from the Synod of Ulster. The 
part of the congregation adhering to the Synod called Mr, 
David Jeffrey, who was ordained here September 13th, 1832. 
Mr. Jeffrey died on the 5th of December, 1872 ; and was 
succeeded by his son, the Eev. Robert Jeffrey, formerly of 
Glenwherry, who was installed here on the 4th of February, 
1873. Mr. Jeffrey, on his removal to Bombay, resigned 
this charge on the 5th of November, 1878 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. John Anderson, who was installed here on the 
20th of May, 1879. 



158 HISTOEY OF CONGKEGATIONS. 

GEOOMSPOET. 

The people of Groomsport were originally connected with 
the congregation of Bangor. Nearly fifty years ago a 
movement was made towards their erection into a congrega- 
tion ; but the lord of the soil strenuously opposed the 
measure, and refused to give any site for a place of worship. 
It so happened, however, that, in the very heart of the 
village, there was a tenement in perpetuity held by a Presby- 
terian willing to part with it on very reasonable terms ; this 
was soon secured, and the congregation forthwith prospered. 
On the 18th of May, 1841, Mr. Isaac Mack was ordained as 
the first minister. Mr. Mack collected funds for the erection, 
not only of the church, but of the schools and other buildings 
connected with it. The people of Groomsport are indebted 
to Mr. William M'Murray, of London, for the very handsome 
balcony in front of the church, as well as for its clock and 
bell. Mr. Mack, who had a great taste for architecture, did 
much to improve the appearance of the village of Groomsport 
and its neighbourhood. He died on the 12th of July, 1877 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. James Latimer,* who was installed 
here on the 2nd of April, 1878. 

HILLSBOEOUGH. 

This congregation was erected by the Presbytery of Belfast 
in April, 1832, and its first minister was Mr. Henry Jackson 
Dobbin (afterwards D.D.), son of the Eev. H. Dobbin, of 
Lurgan. Mr. Dobbin was ordained here on the 18th of 
September, 1833. On the 30th of January, 1837, Mr. Dobbin 
resigned this charge and removed to 1st Ballymena. He 
was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Marcus Dill (afterwards D.D.), 
formerly minister of Magherally, who was installed here on 
the 3rd of October, 1837. On the 28th of September, 1853, 
Mr. Dill resigned this charge and removed to 1st Ballymena, 
as successor to Dr. Dobbin. He was succeeded in Hills- 
borough by Mr. Alexander Montgomery, who was ordained 
here on the 28th of March, 1854. On the 27th of August, 
1854, Mr. Montgomery resigned this charge, having received 
a call to the congregation of Magherafelt. He was succeeded 

* The congregation of Groomsport has recently been much in- 
debted to Samuel Kingham, Esq., J. P., by whose encouragement and 
patronage a beautiful manse has been erected. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 159 

"by Mr. Eobert Templeton, who was installed here on the 
27th of March, 1855. On the 9th of June, 1857, Mr. 
Templeton resigned this charge ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
Galbraith H. Johnston, who was installed here on the 30th 
of September, 1857. 

HILLTOWN. 

This congregation was erected by the Presbytery of 
Dromore in 1826. The first minister was Mr. Edward Allen, 
who was ordained here on the 5th of June, 1827. His 
ministry soon came to a close, as he was set aside for 
immorality in the following year. The next minister was 
Mr. Robert Lockhart, who was ordained here on the 2nd of 
June, 1829. The congregation was still without the Begium 
Bonum, and remained in this position for some time after the 
settlement of Mr. Lockhart. At length in 1831 it obtained 
the grant on what was then the 3rd class — that is, at the 
rate of .£50 a-year, late Ii*ish currency. 

HOLTWOOD 1st. 

The first minister here was Mr. Eobert Cunningham. He 
had been chaplain to the Earl of Buccleugh's regiment in 
Holland, and was admitted to this charge by the Bishop of 
Down and Connor, November 9th, 1615. Mr. Cunningham 
was a man of eminent piety and great ministerial gifts. In 
1636 he was deposed for nonconformity, when he fled to 
Scotland. He died the following year at Irvine, and his 
friend, the great Eobert Blair, of Bangor, composed an 
epitaph in Latin verse, which was inscribed on his tombstone. 
After his deposition there was no minister here till after the 
Irish Eebellion of 1641. On April 8th, 1644, the Covenant 
was administered at Holywood by the Eev. William Adair, 
from Scotland, who preached and presided. An eldership or 
session had been ordained here in June, 1642. Holywood 
was united to Bundonald under the ministry of Peebles, 
Kennedy, and Cobham. Under the ministry of Cobham, in 
1704, a separation took place, and Mr. Cobham died in the 
sole charge of Holywood June 24th, 1706. His successor 
was Mr. Michael Bruce, son of Mr. Bruce, of Killyleagh. He 
was ordained here October 10th, 1711. In 1715 he was 
called to Monaghan, but the Synod decided against his 
removal. The commissioners from Holvwood on this occasion 



160 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

were Arthur Kennedy, Esq., Messrs. Jo. Kennedy, Jo. 
Hamilton, James Russel, and James Hamilton. In 1725 
Mr. Bruce joined the Nonsubscribing Presbytery of Antrim. 
A schism soon afterwards took place in the congregation, 
some of them, with Mr. Bruce, separating from the Synod of 
Ulster, and retaining possession of the meeting-house ; others 
remaining with the Synod, and erecting a new house of 
worship for themselves. Those who remained with the Synod 
were the poorer portion of the congregation. In 1729 they 
applied by their commissioner, Mr. Matthew Eussel, to the 
Synod for assistance, having given a call to a probationer, 
and being able to advance only ^£17 per annum. Their first 
minister was Mr. William Smith, who was ordained here 
November 4th, 1729. He died in this charge October 1st, 
1741 ; and was succeeded by Mr. William Eodgers, who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Bangor, November 20th, 
1743. He removed to Ballynure in 1751. Their next 
minister was Mr. John King, who had been licensed by the 
Presbytery of Warrington, and received by the Synod in 
1743. He was ordained here December 3rd, 1754. He died 
in this charge August 20th, 1777, leaving neither widow nor 
family ; and was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Kennedy, formerly 
minister in America, who was installed by the Presbytery of 
Belfast August 4th, 1778. He died February 7th, 1788, 
leaving a widow and family. Their next minister was Mr. 
Joseph Harrison, who was ordained March 4th, 1788. He 
died February 12th, 1816, leaving a widow and family; and 
was succeeded by his son, Mr. William Hai-rison, who was 
ordained here March 19th, 1816. He died in this charge 
September 15th, 1824, leaving neither widow nor family. 
Their next minister was Mr. Henry Wallace, who was 
ordained here December 5th, 1826. Mr. Wallace (now 
Professor Wallace of the Assembly's College, Belfast) resigned 
this charge on the 6th of May, 1834, and removed to Cork. 
He was succeeded by Mr. William Blackwood, who was 
ordained here on the 17th of February, 1835. In February, 
1844, Mr. Blackwood resigned the pastoral charge, and 
removed to England; and was succeeded by Mr. Henry 
Henderson, who was ordained here on the 25th of September, 
1844. Mr. Henderson becoming infirm, Mr. Henry Halliday 
was ordained here on the 8th of January, 1878. Mr. 
Henderson died on the 7th of December, 1879. 



HISTORY OF CONGKEGATIONS. 161 



INCH. 



The Presbyterians of the island of Incli,near Derry, formerly 
belonged to Burt congregation, but their insular situation 
rendered it inconvenient and somewhat dangerous for them 
to attend public worship on the mainland with very great 
regularity. They were in consequence separated from Burt 
and formed into a distinct congregation by the Presbytery of 
Derry in 1831. Their first minister was Mr. Samuel Armour, 
who was ordained here on the 5th of March, 1833. Mr. 
Armour died on the 11th of June, 1853 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. James Anderson, who had been ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Derry on the 23rd of September, 1852. Ac- 
cording to the Minutes of the Greneral Assembly this little 
congregation consists of twenty-two families. 

ISLANDMAGEE 1st. 

IsLANDMAGEE, a pcuiusula fivo or six miles long and one 
and a-half broad, on the eastei-n coast of the County of 
Antrim, has acquired a historical notoriety as the scene of a 
sad act of party retaliation. Towards the close of 1641, the 
Irish Romanists rose up in rebellion and massacred many 
thousands of the Protestants of Ulster. The butchery went 
on for upwards of two months, and, on the 3rd of January, 
1642, a party of the insurgents murdered in cold blood about 
three score old men, women, and children, about a mile and 
a-half from Carrickfergus Castle. Some of the Protestants of 
the neighbourhood, irritated by these horrid cruelties, on the 
9th of January, 1642, put to death about thirty Romanists in 
their own houses, or near them, in Islandmagee. The story 
that 3,000 Romanists were driven over the Grobbins there is 
a monstrous Popish fiction, invented long afterwards. At 
that time inhere was no Presbyterian minister in the district, 
for the Prelatic party, a few years before, had driven the 
Presbyterian ministers from their pulpits. About six years 
prior to this date, the Rev. Edward Brice, who had preached 
for twenty-three years to the people of Islandmagee and 
Ballycarry, had died, after having been sentenced to deposi- 
tion by the Bishop of Down and Connor. The Presbyterians 
of Islandmagee now remained without a minister till 1647, 
when Mr. Henry Main was ordained among them. He was 
imprisoned by Venables in Carrickfergus in 1650. In 1651 

K 



162 HISTORY or CONGBEGATIONS. 

"we find bim supplying a congregation within tlie bounds of 
the Presbytery of Paisley. In 1658 Mr. William Mill, from 
Aberdeen, was settled here, but, like others brought up in 
that part of Scotland, he was of unsteady principles, and he 
was one of the very few Presbyterian ministers in Ireland 
who conformed at the time of the Restoration. The next 
notice we have of this congregation is in 1671, when we find 
it supplied by Mr. John Haltridge, a probationer, who was 
ordained by the Presbytery of Antrim at Ballycarry on the 
8th of May, 1672. It appears from Wodrow, that Mr. 
Haltridge had been previously chaplain to Sir William 
Cunningham, of Cunningham-head, in Scotland, and that he 
had been brought before the High Commission Court at 
Glasgow in 1664. He was then forbidden to preach by the 
Archbishop of Glasgow, and he, in consequence, came to 
Ireland. He continued in Islandmagee for twenty-five years, 
surviving the Revolution, and dying in 1697. His successor, 
Mr. Robert Sinclair was ordained here May 10th, 1704. He 
died in this charge January 5th, 1731 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Robert Leather, who was ordained here February 
12th, 1733. He was deposed in 1740 for fornication. The 
next minister was Mr. George Heron, a licentiate of the 
Presbytery of Aberdeen, who was ordained here August 8th, 
1747. He was translated from Islandmagee to a living in 
Scotland. He was succeeded by Mr. James Dunbar, who was 
ordained March 14th, 1758. 'Mr. Dunbar died in 1766, 
leaving a widow and family ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
M'Aulay, who was ordained December 14th, 1769. He 
resigned ten years afterwards ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
David Ker, who was ordained March 4th, 1783. Mr. Ker 
demitted the charge in 1788, and removed to America. He 
was succeeded by Mr. John Murphy, who was ordained here 
August 15th, 1789. Becoming infirm, Mr. William Camp- 
bell, a native of Killyleagh, was ordained his assistant and 
successor on the 14th of April, 1829.* Mr. Murphy died 
June 12th, 1842, in the 87th year of his age. Mr. Campbell 
died on the 17th of August, 1876 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. David Steen, who was ordained hei'e on the 14th of 
August, 1877. 

* Soon after his ordination Mr. Campbell took with him one day from 
Belfast a bundle of young trees which he had purchased there ; they 
were j)lanted by him in the meecing-house green of which they are now 
distinguished ornaments. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 163 

KEADY 1st. 

This congregation was established in the heginnino- of the 
eighteenth century. Its first minister was Mr. Thomas 
Milliken, or Mulligan, who was ordained here by the Presby- 
tery of Armagh, December 17th, 1706. He died in January, 
1734, and was succeeded by Mr. John Gibson, formerly 
minister of Cavanaleck, who was installed here January 13th, 
1738. He demitted this charge in 1776. The people now 
gave a call to Mr. Eobert Black, afterwards D.D. and minister 
of Derry, but he did not settle among them. Mr. Joseph 
Smyth was then ordained on the 15th of October, 1777. Mr. 
Gibson died September 25th, 1779, leaving neither widow 
nor family ; and Mr. Smith died July 20th, 1795, leaving 
both a widow and family. The next minister was Mr. Henry 
M'llree, formerly minister of Vinecash, who was installed 
here by the Presbytery of Monaghan, March 8th, 1797. This 
installation was set aside by the Synod in 1798; but in 
1800 it was ordered that he be again installed by the Presbv- 
tery of Monaghan; and the minority who opposed him were 
erected into a separate congregation. Mr. M'llree died 
November 8th, 1817. The next minister was Mr. Andrew 
Breakey, who was ordained here, August 10th, 1819. He 
resigned this charge on the 8th of March, 1831, and removed 
to Killyleagh. He was succeeded by Mr. Solomon Love, who 
was ordained December 28th, 1831. In 1836 Mr. Love was 
degraded. The next minister was Mr. H. W. Carson, now 
D.D., who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Armagh, 
September 12th, 1838. 

KEADY 2nd 

This congregation was erected in 1800, in consequence of 
disputes relative to the election of the minister of the 1st 
congregation. The first minister was Dr. William Steele 
Dickson, who was installed here March 4th, 1803. He had 
previously been minister of Portaferry. In 1812 he was 
suspended ab officio for refusing to retract the assertions 
contained in his famous " Narrative." Dr. Dickson was 
supposed to have been deeply implicated in the Rebellion of 
1798. In 1815 the congregation reported that he had 
resigned the charge through infirmity. The congregation 
was then disannexed from the Presbytery of Tyrone and 



164 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

joined to that of Armagh. The next minister was Mr. 
Joseph Jenkins, who was ordained here March 20, 1816. Dr. 
Dickson was afterwards joined to the Presbytery of Bangor, 
and d ied December 27th, 1824. This congregation did not 
obtain Begium JDonum till l8l6. Mr. Jenkins becoming 
infirm, Mr. George Steen was ordained as his assistant and 
successor on the 9th of November, 1854. Mr. Jenkins died 
on the 30th of August, 1862. 

KILLEAD. 

This congregation appears to have grown out of an early 
settlement at Oldstone. Mr. James Grlendinning removed 
to Oldstone in this parish about 1625, but continued only a 
short time, when he left the country. He was succeeded by 
Mr. Henry Colvert, who had been ordained by the Bishop of 
Eaphoe, May 4th, 1629 ; was helper to Mr. Brice at Broad- 
island, and was admitted to the vicarage of Muckamore 
June 17th, 1630, on the presentation of Eoger Langford, 
Esq. Being deposed by the Bishop of Down in 1636, he fled 
to Scotland, and being admitted minister at Paisley, in 1638, 
died in that charge. This congregation was, no doubt, early 
planted after the restoration of Presbyterianism, but the 
first notice we have of it is not till 1660, when we find Mr. 
Eobert Hamilton minister here. He was deposed by the 
bishop in 1661, but he nevertheless continued to officiate 
among his people till his death in December, 1673. In 
February, 1674, Mr. Patrick Mortimer was their commis- 
sioner to the Presbytery. The following montli they wrote 
to Mr. J. Frieland, in Scotland, to come over with a view to 
being settled here, with which he complied in May, and on 
July" 7th they presented him with a call. In the end of the 
month, however, he returned to Scotland on a visit, and did 
not come back till January 7th, 1675, when he became 
constant supplier. In June their commissioners, Messrs. 
Alexander Gordon and Alexander Bellahill, promised to 
secure Mr. Frieland .£30 per annum, 20 bolls of oats, and 
fuel, and he was ordained in the end of the year. In 
December, 1686, he proposed to have the parish divided, and 
a second minister settled. Accordingly in June, 1687, the 
parish gave a call to Mr. John Malcome to be the minister of 
Lower Killead, where he was ordained December 5th, 1687. 
Mr. Adair, of Ballyeaston, presided on the occasion, and 



HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIOKS. 165 

preached from 2 Cor. ii. 16. Mr. Malcome removed to 
Dunmurry about 1699. Mr. Frieland died March 12th, 
1716 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert Wirling, who was 
installed here May 16th, 1716. The division of this con- 
gregation into Upper and Lower Avas set aside in 1699, and 
the lower part, with Kilmakevit, was ordered to join with 
Glenavy ; and Mr. Malcome removing at the same time to 
Dunmun-y, the whole charge devolved on Mr. Frieland, and 
his successor Mr. Wirling. Mr. Wirling was deposed from 
the ministry in 1726, but for what offence the minutes do 
not specify. In 1730, however, having professed his repent- 
ance, and his resolution to carry more cautiously for the 
future, he was restored to the ministry, but was not suffered 
to preach in this congregation. The nest minister was Mr. 
Hugh Scott, who was ordained here April 9th, 1733. He 
was pi-esent at the Synod in 1735, but removed in that year 
to the first congregation of Newtownards. He was succeeded 
by Mr. John M'Connell, who was ordained here May 3rd, 
1737. He died June 8th, 1770, leaving neither widow nor 
family ; and was succeeded by Mr. Andrew Hume, who was 
ordained here February 26th, 1772. He appears to have 
been deposed about the year 1783. Their next minister was 
Mr. Robert Orr, who was ordained here January 2nd, 1787. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. Joseph M'Kee was ordained to the 
charge September 5th, 1826. Mr. Orr died in Belfast on 
Sunday, the 13th of October, 1833, leaving a widow and 
family. Mr. M'Kee resigned the charge of the congregation 
in July, 1849, and died in 1856. Mr. Henry E. Mecredy 
was ordained to the charge in March, 1850. 

KILLESHANDRA. 

This congregation was at one time also called Croghan. 
In 1688 Mr. Samuel Kelso was minister here. At the 
Revolution he retired to Scotland, and probably never 
returned. The next minister was Mr. James Tate, who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Monaghan on the 10th 
of May, 1705. He died in this charge on the 17th of May, 
1729. The next minister was Mr. James Hamilton, who was 
ordained here on the 23rd of February, 1732. He removed 
from this to Ballyjamesduff in the following year. He was 
succeeded by Mr. George Carson, who was ordained here on 
the 21st of May, 1735. In August, 1780, he resigned the 



166 HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

charge through bodily infirmity ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Millar, who had formerly been minister at Ennis- 
killen, and who was installed here on the 7th of May, 1781. 
Mr. Carson died on the 10th of January, 1782. Mr. Millar 
resigned his charge here on the 1st of July, 1795 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Joseph Lawson, formerly minister at 
Lisluney, who was installed here on the 16th of June, 1796. 
He died in this charge on the 7th of February, 1799, leaving 
a widow and child. The next minister was Mr. Joseph 
Denham, formerly minister at Ennishillen, who was installed 
here in September, 1799. He was the father of the Rev. Dr. 
Denham of Londonderry. Mr. Denham died in this charge 
on the 21st of October, 1834 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William White, son of Mr. Patrick White, minister of Bailie- 
borough. Mr. White was ordained here on the 29th of 
September, 1835. He resigned this charge on the 19th of 
October, 1839, and removed to Downpatrick. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. William Sweeny, who had formerly been 
connected with the Covenanters, and who was installed here 
by the Presbytery of Monaghan on the 30th of March, 1841. 
Mr. Sweeny becoming infirm, Mr. William James Stronge was 
ordained as his assistant on the 31st of December, 1867. 
Mr. Sweeny died shortly afterwards. Mr. Stronge, on his 
removal to Churchtown, resigned this charge on the 29th of 
June, 1880 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John H. Whitsitt, 
who was ordained here on the 3rd of March, 1881. 

KILLETEE. 

This congregation originally formed part of that of Derg. 
It was disannexed from it in November, 1827. The first 
minister was Mr. John Davis, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Strabane on the 6th of February, 1 828. Mr. 
Davis died on the 25th of February, 1832, leaving neither 
widow nor family. He was succeeded by Mr. Joseph 
Crockett, who was ordained here on the 20th of December, 
1832. In August, 1837, Mr. Crockett resigned the charge 
and removed to Derg. He was succeeded by Mr. William 
Hamilton, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Strabane on the 20th of February, 1838 ; but, this ordination 
having been effected in opposition to an appeal to the Synod, 
was declared irregular by the Synod in June, 1838, and Mr. 
Hamilton was consequently disannexed from the congrega- 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 167 

tion. The next minister was Mr. Josepli Love, who was 
ordained here on the 26th of February, 1839. Mr. Love 
died on the 23rd of May, 1885 ; and on the 18th of August 
following, his son, the Eev. George C. Love, was installed 
here. 



KILLINCHY. 

This congregation was originally united to that of Killy- 
leagh, under the ministry of Mr. Bole. Its first settled 
minister was Mr. John Livingston, who was ordained by the 
Bishop of Raphoe, and located here in August, 1630. After 
several vicissitudes, detailed in his Life, he ultimately fled to 
Scotland in the year 1637.* The congregation continued 
destitute of a regular ministry till 1657, when Mr. Livingston, 
now in Scotland, sent them over Mr. Michael Bruce, who 
was ordained in the parish church of Killinchy by the Presby- 
tery in the autumn of the same year. At the Restoration he 
was deposed by the bishop, and fled to Scotland. After 
sustaining various hardships, both in Scotland and at London, 
he obtained permission to return to Killinchy in 1670. In 
the summer of that year the first meeting-house ever erected 
in the parish was built. In 1714 this house was thrown 
down and another erected on the same spot. At the troubles 
in 1689 Mr. Bruce again retreated to Scotland in spring; and 
becoming minister at Anworth, in Galloway, he died there in 
1693, and lies buried in the church of that parish. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Archibald Hamilton, who removed from 
Armagh, and was installed here by the Presbytery of Down 
in March, 1693. He died at Belfast January 4th, 1699, and 
was buried at Bangor, where his tomb and epitaph are still 
to be seen. The next minister was Mr. James Reid, whowas 
ordained here April 28th, 1702. He continued to be minister 
here for fifty-one years, and died in the beginning of June, 
1753. Their next minister was Mr. Joseph Kinkead, who 
removed hither from Stranorlar in 1755 ; but owing to dis- 
putes between the people and the Presbytery of Killyleagh, 
his installation was a long time delayed. At length he was 
installed here by the Presbytery of Bangor April 28th, 1763. 
He died July 20th, 1782, leaving a widow and family. Their 

* Mr. Livingston was one of the most awakening preachers of the 
age. The revival of the Kirk of Shots took place under a sermon he 
delivered. 



168 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

next minister was Mr, George M'Ewen, ordained here by tlie 
Presbytery of Belfast March 11th, 1783. He died March 
20th, 1795, leaving a widow and family ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Samuel Watson, who was ordained here in September, 
1797. In August, 1835, Mr. Watson was suspended sinedie 
for Arianism, whereupon he joined the Eemonstrants ; and 
was succeeded by Mr. David Anderson, who was ordained to 
this charge December 6th, 1836. Mr. Anderson died on the 
25th of January, 1871 ; and was succeeded by Mr. David R. 
Moore, who was ordained here on the 2nd of April, 1872. 

KILLYLEAGH 1st. 

The first minister of this congregation was Mr. John Bole 
He was blind. In 1639 he was imprisoned for refusing to 
take the " black oath," and dissuading his people from the 
same. The next minister was Mr. William Richardson, who 
was ordained here about the beginning of the year 1649. 
He died July 27th, 1670. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Alexander Ferguson, who had before, for twelve years, been 
minister of Sorbie, in Scotland. Mr. Ferguson settled at 
Killyleagh in 1670, and died there in 1684 in the 53rd year 
of his age. He was succeeded by Mr. James Bruce, son of 
Mr. Michael Bruce, of Killinchy, and ancestor of Sir Hervey 
Bruce, of Downhill. Mr. Bruce removed to Scotland at the 
Revolution, where he remained for some time, but returned 
in 1691. During the early part of his ministry here, the 
Hamilton family kept a chaj^lain in Killyleagh Castle, who 
was a member of the Presbytery of Down, and sat with it. 
His name was Patrick Peacock. It is said that he was 
married to a relative of the Hamilton family. In 1697 it is 
reported to the Synod of Ulster that a philosophy school, 
conducted by Mr. James M'Alpine, had been established at 
Killyleagh. It was designed to prepare young men going 
forward to the ministry with a philosophical education. Mr. 
James Bruce died February 17th, 1730 ; and was succeeded 
by his son, Mr. Patrick Bruce, who had previously been 
minister of Drumbo. Mr. Patrick Bruce was installed as 
minister of Killyleagh in the beginning of the year 1731, but 
died here April 9th, 1732. He was succeeded by Mr. Gilbert 
Kennedy, jun., who had been a short time minister of 
Lisburn, and was installed here in the beginning of the year 
1733. In 1744 Mr. Kennedy removed to the 2nd congrega- 



HISTOET OF CONGREGATIONS. 169 

tion of Belfast, but still remained a member of the Synod of 
Ulster, though the congregation to which he was now trans- 
ferred had been previously connected with the Presbytery of 
Antrim. Mr. Kennedy was succeeded in Killyleagh by Mr. 
William Dun, who was ordained May 29th, 1745. Mr. Dun 
removed to Cook Street Congregation, Dublin, in February, 
1765. The next minister was Mr. Joseph Little, who was 
ordained to the pastoral charge November 18th, 1768. Mr. 
Little was a highly respectable scholar, and possessed of no 
small amount of talent. His influence was most beneficially 
exerted towards the end of the last century. He steadfastly 
opposed himself to the spread of revolutionary principles, so 
that the spirit of sedition which broke out into open rebellion 
in the year 1798 made comparatively little progress in the 
neighbourhood of Killyleagh. But his ministerial efficiency 
was greatly impaired by his eccentricities and his avarice. 
At the time of his demise he is said to have possessed 
property to the amount of ,£15,000 or ,£16,000. He died in 
July, 1813 ; and was succeeded by Mr. W. D. H. M'Ewen, 
who had formerly been minister of Usher's Quay, Dublin, 
and who was installed here August 17, 1813. Mr. M'Ewen 
removed to the 2nd congregation, Belfast, in 1817 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Henry Cooke (afterwards D.D., LL.D.), 
who had formerly been minister, first of Dunean, and after- 
wards of Donegore, and who was installed here September 
8th, 1818. Shortly after his settlement at Killyleagh, Mr. 
Cooke distinguished himself as the assailant of Arianism ; 
and in his efforts to free the Synod of Ulster from that 
heresy he was nobly supported by his elder, Captain Rowan. 
Mr. Cooke removed to Belfast in 1829 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Andrew Breakey, who had formerly been minister of 
1st Keady, and who was installed here March 22nd, 1831. 
Mr. Breakey becoming infirm, Mr. William Witherow, 
formerly of Donaghadee, was installed here on the 6th of 
April, 1882. Mr. Breakey died on the 17th of November of 
the same year ; and Mr. Witherow, on his removal to West- 
bourne Church, Ballymacarrett, resigned this charge on the 
30th of January, 1883 ; «nd was succeeded by Mr. John E. 
M'Cleery,who was installed hereon the 7th of August, 1883. 

KILMOEE. 

This congregation was formed in 1713, when we find 



170 HISTORY OF CONGREaATIONS. 

Saintfield complaining of some townlands being taken from 
it and transferred to the new erection. The first minister 
was Mr. Thomas Elder, of whom we have the following 
notice in the Synod's minutes for 1715 : — " Down Presbytery 
reported that Mr. Thomas Elder, who was some time ago 
deposed from the office of the holy ministry by the General 
Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland, and he having represented 
his case to the Synod of Belfast, who, being well informed of 
his good deportment since he came into the bounds of that 
Synod, wrote a letter to the Assembly in his behalf, and that 
he went with said letter to the Assembly, who have now 
restored him to the office of the ministry." The act of the 
Assembly was accordingly read, and Mr. Elder acknowledged 
as a minister. He was installed in this charge on the 14th 
of June, 1716. He was present at the Synod in 1726, but he 
either died or left this charge soon after. He was succeeded 
by Mr. Samuel Fugie, or Eergie, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Bangor on the 23rd of October, 1728. 
He died in this charge May 3rd, 1765, leaving a widow and 
family. He was succeeded by Mr. Moses Neilson, who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Killyleagh in 1767.* 
Becoming infirm, his son, Arthur Neilson was ordained his 
assistant and successor on the 13th of June, 1810. Dr. 
Moses Neilson died April 23rd, 1823, leaving a widow and 
family. In 1829 Mr. Arthur Neilson and this congregation 
seceded from the Synod of Ulster, but, at his death in 1831, 
the majority of the people returned to the Synod; and Mr. 
Moses Black was ordained here by the Presbytery of Belfast 
on the 2nd of April, 1833. The present place of worship was 
built mainly through the exertions of a single individual, 
the late worthy Mr. David K. Clarke. Mr. Black died on the 
12th March, 1881 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Thomas 
Alexander, formerly of Courtrai, who was installed here on 
the 13th of September of the same year. 

KILEATJGHTS 1st. 

We find Mr. Eobert Nelson miriSster here in 1702. He 
appears to have been settled in the place some time before. 
In 1712 disputes commenced between Mr. Nelson and his 

*The Neilsons were distinguished by their linguistic attainments, 
and did much to promote a knowledge of classical literature in the 
North of Ireland. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 171 

people, so that the Synod in the following year recommended 
his demission of the charge. He had been guilty of no 
immorality, but the Synod considered that his continuance 
here would not be for edification. The Synod required the 
people to pay an arrear of £60 due to him, and agreed that 
his Begium Donum should be continued. He died in May, 
1721. He was succeeded by Mr. John Cochrane, who was 
ordained here on the 27th September, 1716. In 1731 he 
was called to Bangor ; but the Synod decided that he should 
continue in Kilraughts. In 1748 the Synod, after a second 
application, permitted him to remove to Bangor. He was 
succeeded here by Mr. Robert Ewing, who was ordained on 
the 12th of June, 1751. He died on the 23rd September, 
1786. The next minister was Mr. Matthew Elder, who was 
ordained to this charge in 1789. He died July 23rd, 1827, 
leaving a widow and family. Considerable disputes pre- 
vailed in this congregation after Mr. Elder's death. Mr. W. 
D. Killen (afterwards D.D.) obtained a call to the place ; 
but a number of the people, absurdly suspecting him of 
Arianism, still remained dissatisfied. A second poll was 
taken at his request, when he was rejected after a close 
contest — 145 voting for him and 74 against him. At length 
Mr. Thomas Leslie was ordained to this charge by a synodical 
committee on the 29th December, 1830. He resigned the 
charge on the 27th of January, 1835, and proceeded to 
Jamaica as a missionary under the Scottish Missionary 
Society. He died in Jamaica on the 18th August, 1835. 
The next minister was Mr. Robert Love, who was ordained 
here on the 21st of June, 1836. Mr. Love died on the 18th 
January, 1849 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Samuel Finlay, 
who was ordained here on the 12th of March, ] 850. 

KILREA 1st. 

This congregation originally went by the name of Tamlagh. 
Mr. William Gilchrist was minister here for many years 
before the Revolution of 1688. He died inDerry during the 
siege. Tamlagh, Kilrea, and Bovidy formed one congrega- 
tion. The charge was vacant for some time after the 
Revolution. In 1697 Mr. Matthew Clerk was ordained here. 
Mr. Clerk had served as an ofiicer in the Protestant army 
during the civil commotions, and had received a wound at 
the siege of Derry. He was an excellent scholar ; and, laying 



172 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

aside the military profession at the end of the wars, entered 
the Presbyterian ministry. He was thoroughly Calvinistic 
in his religious views, genial in his temper, and retained a 
good deal of the martial spirit as long as he lived. In 1729 
he resigned the charge of the Kilrea congregation, and, 
though about seventy years of age, emigrated to America, 
where he became minister of the congregation of Londondeny. 
He died six years afterwards, January 25th, 1735, aged 76. 
He was succeeded in Kilrea by Mr. Robert Wirling, formerly 
minister of Killead, who was installed here in 1731. In 
1741 the people complained to the Synod of their great 
weakness and inability to support a minister. In the same 
year Mr. Wirling removed to Donagheady. The next 
minister was Mr. Alexander Cumine, who was ordained here 
by the Presbytery of Route May 22nd, 1744. He died in 
this charge November 9th, 1748 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
John Smith, who was ordained here October 31st, 1749. In 
1779 the inhabitants of Bovidy prayed the Synod to be 
erected into a distinct congregation, having 226 heads of 
families in that quai-ter. This was opposed by Tamlagh, 
Kilrea, and Desert. The Synod directed Mr. Smith to divide 
his labours between the two places. A Seceding congregation 
was eventually erected at Bovidy. Mr. Smith died October 
2nd, 1785. The next minister was Mr. Arthur M'Mahon, 
who was ordained here October 12th, 1789. Mr. M'Mahon 
was an excellent scholar, and had previously been tutor in 
the Londonderry family, which then was connected with the 
Presbyterian Church. From Mr. M'Mahon the great Lord 
Castlereagh, afterwards Premier of England, received his 
classical education. Mr. M'Mahon, in October, 1 794, demitted 
the charge of the Kilrea congregation, and removed to Holy- 
wood. He subsequently became deeply implicated in the 
treasonable proceedings of the United Irishmen, and with 
difficulty escaped to France, where he is said to have entered 
the military service ; and there is a tradition, we cannot say 
whether true or false, that he is the same individual who, as 
General Mack, acquired such distinguished reputation. He 
was succeeded at Kilrea by Mr. John Smyth, who was 
ordained here March 17th, 1795. In June, 1805, Mr. Smyth 
prayed the Synod to remove him from Route to Ballymena 
Presbytery, which was granted. Mr. Smyth died September 
7th, 1821. He was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Walker Rodgers, 
who was ordained here April 12th, 1825. Mr, Rodgers was 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 173 

moderator of the Synod of Ulster in 1836. During his 
ministry the present excellent place of worship was built. 
Mr. Rodgers died in July, 1851 ; and was succeeded by his 
son, Mr. James Maxwell Rodgers, who was ordained 22nd 
June, 1853. Mr. Rodgers, on his removal to Derry, in 
March, 1869, resigned this charge ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. James Heron, formerly of Muckamore, who was installed 
here on the 7th of May, 1869. On his removal to Knock in 
November, 1873, Mr. Heron was succeeded by Mr. James 
Stewart, who was installed here on the 27th of February, 
1874. 

KINGSTOWN". 

This congregation was erected in 1827, and its first 
minister was Mr. William Freeland. He was ordained here 
on the 1st of June, 1828. In the year 1831 this congregation 
obtained Begium Domvvi on the 3rd class — that is, ^£50 late 
Irish currency. Mr. Freeland was disannexed from this 
charge in 1838, and afterwards installed in Ballygawley. 
He was succeeded by Mr. John Armstrong, who was ordained 
here on the 30th of June, 1840. At the Assembly of 1859, 
in consequence of the protracted ill-health of Mr. Armstrong, 
his congregation obtained leave to choose an assistant and 
successor ; and on the 23rd of February, 1860, Mr. Samuel 
Jackson Hanson, formerly minister of Conlig, was installed 
here. 

KIRKCUBBIISr. 

This congregation was originally part of Bally halbert or 
Glastry, In 1777 the people applied to the Synod to be 
erected into a congregation, but without success. Neverthe- 
less they persisted, and gave a call to Mr. George Brydone, 
who was ordained to this charge by the Presbytery of Lauder, 
in Scotland. The Synod of Ulster in 1778 resented the 
interference of the Scottish Presbytery, and addressed a 
letter of remonstrance on the subject to the Moderator of the 
General Assembly. Mr. Brydone and his congregation were 
not received into connection with the Synod till 1783. He 
died here on the 6th of September, 1817, leaving neither 
widow nor family. He was succeeded by Mr. Alexander 
M'Ewen, who was ordained here on the 16th of October, 
1817. Mr. M'Ewen becoming infirm, demitted the charge in 
1837 ; and Mr. James Rowan was ordained to succeed him 



174 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

on the 30tla of January, 1838. Mr. M'Ewen died on the 29th 
of January, 1 839. In 1868 Mr. Eowan obtained leave for 
the congregation to choose an assistant and successor ; and 
on the 1st of June, 1869, Mr. Samuel Hawthorne was ordained 
to the pastoral charge. Mr. Rowan died on the 5 th of 
December, 1877. 

KNOWHEAD. 

The earliest notice we have of this congregation is in 
connection with the ordination of Mr. Robert Huey. The 
congregation was then called MufE. Mr. Huey appears to 
have been the minister only for a short time. He was 
ordained February 10th, 1749 ; but shortly afterwards he 
resigned and went to America. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Stephen Brizzle, who was ordained here October 30th, 1776. 
He was deposed by the Presbytery of Derry on the 1st of 
February, 1780, and died at the advanced age of 92, on the 
20th of January, 1831. The next minister was Mr. James 
Patton, who was ordained October 7th, 1783, and who died 
in this charge on the 24th of June, 1790. He was succeeded 
by Mr. Richard Dill, who was ordained here on the 9th of 
December, 1793. Mr. Dill becoming infirm, Mr. John M. 
Bleckley was ordained as his assistant on the 27th of June, 
1848. Mr. Dill died on the 20th of November, 1850. On 
the 21st of October, 1856, Mr. Bleckley resigned the charge 
of the congregation and removed to Wicklow. On the 24th 
of March, 1857, Mr. John Camac was ordained to the pastoral 
charge. 

LARNE 1st. 

This is one of the oldest Presbyterian congregations in 
Ireland. The first minister was Mr. George Dunbar, who 
had been minister at Ayr, in Scotland, and who settled here 
about 1620. He was deposed by the Bishop of Down and 
Connor in 1636, when he removed to Scotland, and died 
minister of Calder in 1638. On the fall of Prelacy, this 
congregation was speedily settled with a minister. Mr. 
Thomas Hall was ordained to this charge in 1646. He was 
subsequently obliged to make his escape to Scotland to avoid 
the persecution of the Republicans then in power, but returned 
to his people before 1660. He was deposed by Bishop Jeremy 



HISTOKY OF CONGREGATIONS. 175 

Taylor immediately after tlie Restoration; but he continued 
privately to minister to his people amidst many outward 
discouragements. In March, 1674, Mr. Adair, the author of 
the celebrated Narrative of the early settlement of our 
Church in this country, visited Larne by appointment of 
Presbytery, and reported that " he found the people con- 
siderably in ari'ear with their minister, almost to the half of 
what was promised him, for these four years past." Mr. 
Hugh Porter, an elder, promised that they would be inore 
punctual. Mr. Hall died in 1695, aged 75. Mr. William 
Leech was called to Larne in 1697 ; but his career here was 
short. He was succeeded by Mr. William Ogilvie, who was 
ordained here on the 5th of November, 1700. He died on 
the 12th of September, 1712. During the disputes which 
arose after his death the congregation was divided into two 
parts, which have ever since remained separate. One part 
chose Mr. James Hood as their minister, and subsequently 
joined the non- subscribing Presbytery of Antrim ; the other 
chose for their minister Mr. Samuel Getty, who was ordained 
here on the same day as Mr. Hood — that is, on the 15th of 
June, 1715. Mr. Getty was the ancestor of John Getty, 
Esq., of Beechpark, Belfast, who lately bequeathed his large 
property to the Irish General Assembly. Mr. Getty died 
here on the 27th of February, 1724; and was succeeded by 
Mr. William Thompson, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Templepatrick on the 7th of June, 1726. Mr. 
Thompson died in this charge on the 13th of May, 1763. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Isaac Cowan, who was ordained 
here on the 20th of August, 1765. He died on the 2nd of 
March, 1787, leaving a widow and family. The next minister 
was Mr, Robert Thompson, who was ordained here on the 
9th of June, 1789. He died in this charge about the middle 
of August, 1814 ; and was succeeded by Mi-. James Cochx-ane, 
who was ordained here on the 22nd of December, 1815. On 
the 7th of May following he was suspended by the Synod 
for immorality; but in 1817 he was restored. In 1823 he 
was again suspended, and finally on the 22nd of June, 1824, 
he was suspended sine die, and disannexed from the congrega- 
tion. The next minister was Mr. Joseph Shaw, formerly 
minister of Portglenone, who was installed here on the 4th 
of January, 1825. He died in this charge, at the early age 
of 29, on the 13th of August, 1830. He was succeeded by 
Mr. Henry William Molyneux (afterwards D.D.), who was 



176 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

ordained here on the 9th of June, 1831. Dr. Molyneux died 
on the 23rd of August, 1871 ; and was succeeded by Mr. J. 
Brady Meek, who was installed here in the summer of 1872. 

LETTERKENNY 1st. 

The first minister here was Mr. William Semple, who was 
ordained in 1647, and died in this charge October 1 9th, 
1674. The next minister was Mr. William Liston. About 
the time of the arrival of King William in Ireland, after the 
Revolution, some of the Presbyterians of the North of 
Ireland appear to have imagined that their system of 
ecclesiastical polity was about to be established by law in the 
country, as it had been in Scotland ; and, in two or three 
places, they proceeded, rather prematurely, to take possession 
of the parish churches. Mr. Liston is said to have preached 
for two or three Lord's days in the Episcopal church of 
Letterkenny, and in some other Episcopal churches in the 
neighbourhood ; but the Synod of Ulster, which met in 
Belfast July 3rd, 1690 — only three days after the battle of 
the Boyne — required him not to repeat such conduct. He 
died in June, 1695. The next minister was Mr. Samuel 
Dunlop, who was ordained here August 13th, 1707. He died 
August 30th, 1762, leaving a widow ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Joseph Lyttle, who was ordained here April 20th, 1763. 
Becoming infirm, his nephew, Mr. Josejih Lyttle, jun., was 
ordained his assistant and successor May 31st, 1803. Mr. 
Lyttle, sen., died January 7th, 1805, leaving no family. Mr. 
Joseph Lyttle, secundus, becoming infirm, Mr. Moses 
Houston, who had been minister of Fannet, was installed his 
assistant and successor on the 6th of April, 1841. In 1847 
Mr. Houston was set aside on a charge of immorality ; and 
on the 27th December, 1848, the Eev. John Kinnear (now 
D.D.) was ordained to the pastoral charge. Mr. Lyttle died 
on the 19th December, 1852. 

LIMAYADT 2nd.* 

Mr. David Wilson was ordained here by the Presbytery 
of Route, August 18th, 1696. He died in this charge 
June 23rd, 1715. In 1718 William Connolly, Esq., wrote to 

* What is now 1st Limavady was originally one of tiie earliest settle- 
ments of the Seceders in Ireland. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 177 

the Synod on behalf of Mr. John Hillhouse, a probationer, 
recommending him as the minister ; but he went to America. 
At last they obtained as minister Mr. William Conyngham, 
who was ordained here February 3rd, 1 720. He died in this 
charge 1740. After his death there was much contention in 
the congregation. Mr. Joseph Osborne was ordained here 
by the Presbytery of Antrim ; but many of the people were 
dissatisfied, and refi],sed to join his ministry. The mal- 
contents were erected into the congregation of Drumachose, 
and Mr. Henry Areskine, or Erskine, was ordained as their 
minister by the Presbytery of Derry, May 4th, 1742. After 
living in a state of constant bickering with his co-presbyters, 
and being charged with several immoralities, he demitted 
his charge in October, 1761. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Jacob Davis, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Eoute, April 26th, 1763. He died December 30th, 1786, 
leaving a widow. The next minister was Mr. Daniel Blair, 
who was ordained here in the end of May, 1788. He died on 
the 10th of February, 1811, leaving a widow and family ; and 
was succeeded by Mr. Richard Dill, formerly minister of 
Buckna, who was installed here March 10th, 1812. He 
resigned this charge January 28th, 1823, and removed to the 
adjoining congregation of Bally kelly. Their next minister 
was Mr. John M'Laughlin, Avho was ordained here September 
28th, 1824. Mr. M'Laughlin died suddenly on the 3rd of 
November, 1831, leaving neither widow nor family. He was 
succeeded by Mr. George Steen, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Eoute on the 12th of March, 1833. In 
Mr. Steen's time a meeting-house was built in the town of 
Limavady, when he was called to the charge of the new 
congregation, resigning that of Drumachose. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. Steen obtained as his assistant the Rev. Robert 
Henry, who was installed here on the 30th of November, 
1882. 

LIMERICK. 

It is probable that some members of the Church of Scot- 
land settled in Limerick as early as the times of James I. or 
Charles I., but we have now no record to illustrate their 
history. The first minister of the congregation of whom we 
find mention was Mr. Squire, but of him we know nothing 
more than the name. Soon after the Revolution, the people 

L 



178 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

rented the chapel of the old Augustinian Nunnery in Peter's 
Cell. (See History, Topography, and Antiquities of Limerick, 
II. 663). About that time the Eev. William Bigger was 
their minister. In 1698 Mr. Bigger was invited by some 
Presbyterians in Galway to preach occasionally and administer 
ordinances to them ; but he was aj)prehended, brought before 
the Mayor, and committed to prison. He was soon liberated, 
but the case created much excitement. Mr. Bigger is said 
to have removed afterwards to Drogheda. He was succeeded 
by Mr. S. Smith, who was a high Calvinist. His successor 
was Dr. Labun, a minister probably of French extraction. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Wallace and Mr. Seawright. In 
1776 the people erected a meeting-house in Peter Street, and 
built a house for the minister, at the expense of d£500. 
Since the commencement of the present century the congre- 
gation has received an accession of numbers and wealth by 
the settlement of several Scotch merchants in the city, and 
since then the present commodious edifice of hewn stone in 
Glentworth Street has been built. Mr. Seawright was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. John Pinkerton, who was followed by Mr. 
Dickie and Mr. Nelson. In January, 1837, Mr. M'Corkle, a 
licentiate of the Church of Scotland, was settled as the 
pastor. Mr. M'Corkle returned to Scotland ; and, towai'ds 
the close of the year 1844, Mr. David Wilson (now D.D.), 
who had previously been ordained at Carnmoney, removed to 
Limerick. The Presbytery of Munster, to which the con- 
gregation belonged, was at this time a separate body ; but in 
1854 it became incorporated with the Irish General Assembly. 
The Eev. Dr. Wilson, the present minister of Limerick, has 
been twice Moderator of the Assembly. 

LISBUEN 1st. 

The first minister of this congregation cannot now be 
ascertained. At a meeting of Presbytery held at Ballyclare, 
on the 6th of April, 1687, Messrs. William Livingston and 
John M'Kneight appeared as commissioners from Lisbum, 
and " sought supply of ordained ministers in order to their 
being j)lanted with a Gospel minister." In November 
folloAving the peoj^le presented a call to Mr. Alexander 
M'Cracken, who had been licensed by the Presbytery in 1684, 
and who was ordained to the pastoral charge of the congrega- 
tion on 3rd July, 1688. Mr. Patrick Adair, of Belfast, 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 179 

presided on the occasion, and preached from 1 Cor. iv. 1, 2. 
Mr. M'Cracken had the promise of d£40 yearly of stipend. 
In 1707 the town of Lisburn was destroyed by a great fire, 
which consumed both the Episcoj)al church and the Presby- 
terian meeting-house. The fire broke out on Sunday, the 
20th of April, a little before twelve o'clock. The meeting- 
house was rebuilt, at an expense of about =£400. The edifice 
destroyed was valued at d6500. Mr. M'Cracken had scruples 
about the oath of abjuration,* and was, in consequence of his 
refusal to take it, more than once brought into trouble. He 
was a loyal subject, and a staunch supporter of the house of 
Hanover ; but he objected to some parts of the phraseology 
of the oath, and the High Church party most ungenerously 
took advantage of his scrupulosity to give him annoyance. 
He died in November, 1730 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
Gilbert Kennedy, who was ordained to the pastoral charge 
June 7th, 1732. Mr. Kennedy soon afterwards removed to 
Killyleagh ; and was succeeded as minister of Lisbum by 
Mr. William Patton, who had been minister of Ervey and 
Carrickmaclim, and who was installed here July 7th, 1736, 
During his ministry the Seceders made their appearance in 
the North of Ireland, and some of their earliest adherents 
had at one time belonged to the congregation over which he 
presided. Those who joined the new-comers eventually 
established the congregation of Hillhall. Mr. Patton removed 
to Plunket Street congregation, Dublin, in August, 1745; 
and was succeeded in Lisburn by Mr. Patrick Buchanan, who 
was ordained to the pastoral charge July 29th, 1747. Mr. 
Buchanan died in November, 1 763 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. James Bryson, who was ordained June 7th, 1764. 
Mr. Bryson removed to the 2nd congregation of Belfast 
in 1773; and was succeeded in Lisburn by Mr. George 
Kennedy, who was ordained February 15th, 1775. Mr. 
Kennedy's pastorate was short, as he died in April, 1779. 
He was succeeded by Mr. William Bruce, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Bangor on the 4th of November, 
1779. Mr. Bruce removed, first to Strand Street congrega- 
tion, Dublin, and finally to the 1st congregation, Belfast. 
Dr. Bruce, when in Belfast, was president of the Academy, 
and a member of the Presbytery of Antrim. He was suc- 

* The oath of abjuration was understood to imply that the Pretender 
was not the son of James II., so that, on this ground, many scrupled to 
take it. 



180 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIOlSrS. 

ceedecl in Lisburn by Mr. Andrew Craig, wlio had formerly 
been minister of Moira, and who was installed in Lisburn in 
1783. Becoming infirm, Mr. James Morgan (afterwards Dr. 
Morgan), who had formerly been minister of Carlow, was 
installed as his assistant June 23rd, 1824. Mr. Morgan 
resigned the charge on receiving a call from Fisherwick 
Place congregation, Belfast ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
Alexander Henderson, who was ordained on the 29th of June, 
1829. Mr. Henderson, on receiving ?.n appointment as 
military chaplain, resigned this charge on the 4th of 
December, 1855 ; and was succeeded by Mr. William Breakey, 
who was installed here on the 3rd of September, 1856. Mr. 
Breakey died on the 6th of Aj^ril, 1872 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. John L. Eentoul, who wa'S ordained here on the 17th 
of October, 1872. 

LISLOONEY. 

This congregation was originally connected with Minter- 
bui'n under the name of Kinnaird. It was erected into a 
separate charge in 1714; but it did not obtain a minister 
until some time afterwards. At length Mr. Samuel Irvine 
was ordained here by the Clogher Presbytery on the 1st of 
October, 1718. He died in this charge October 6th, 1729 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. William Ambrose, who was 
ordained as minister of Kinnaird on the 2nd of August, 
1732. He died in this charge on the 29th of December, 
1765, leaving a family. He was succeeded by Mr. George 
Harris, who was ordained here on the 2nd of August, 1768. 
Mr. Harris died on the 15th of February, 1785; and was 
succeeded by Mr. James M'Adani, who was ordained on the 
14th of March, 1787. He was deposed July 10th, 1788 ; and 
was succeeded by Mr. Joseph Lawson, who was ordained on 
the 15th of August, 1789. He removed to Killeshandra in 
June, 1796. Their next minister was Mr. James Gribson, 
who was ordained here on the 5th of August, 1801. In 1834 
Mr. Gibson resigned the charge through infirmity ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Robert P. Borland, who was ordained on 
the 22nd of September, 1836. Mr. Gibson long survived 
his resignation, as he died in December, 1866. Mr. Borland 
died on the 26th of July, 1862. He was succeeded by Mr. 
James Carson, who was ordained here on the 24th of June, 
1863. Mr. Carson resigned the charge of the congregation 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 181 

on the 20tli of March, 1866, and removed to Waterford. 
The next minister, Mr. Edward F. Simpson, was ordained 
here on the 26th of September, 1866. Mr. Simpson, on his 
removal to Ballymena, was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Irvine, 
who was ordained here on the 81st of January, 1877. 

LISSARA. 

The Seceders made their appearance in Ireland upwards 
of 140 years ago. In 1775 a small place of worship was 
erected at Lissara, and not long afterwards Mr. John 
Sturgeon was ordained by the Associate Seceding Presbytery 
of Down as minister of the united congregation of Lissara 
and Ballynahinch. Mr. Sturgeon remained pastor of Lissara 
and Ballynahinch till his death. About the time of his 
death these places were erected into separate charges, and 
early in the year 1796 Mr. John Eeid was ordained as the 
Seceding minister of Lissara. Mr. Eeid's j^astorate here was 
short, amounting only to five years. He removed to Drum- 
banagher in 1801. He was succeeded by Mr. Denham, who 
was a medical jjractitioner as well as a preacher ; and, in 
consequence of his intemj)erate habits, he was soon obliged 
to give up the ministry. He was succeeded by Mr. Joseph 
Lowry, who was ordained here on the 25tli of April, 1809. 
His ministry in Lissara was long. He died here on the 21st 
of July, 1858, in the 82nd year of his age. Mr. Lowry gave 
instruction in classics at his own residence ; and some of the 
present ministers of the General Assembly received their 
education from him. He was succeeded as minister of 
Lissara by Mr. John Gibson Thomson, who was ordained 
here on the 21st of December, 1858. 

LONDONDERRY 1st. 

The Presbyterians early obtained a settlement in London- 
derry — but we know little of their state there immediately 
after the massaci'e of 1641. In May, 1644, the Covenant 
was solemnly administered in the Cathedral to great multi- 
tudes by Messrs. Weir and Adair from Scotland ; and the 
sacrament was disj^ensed afterwards in the same place — the 
altar being removed. The first minister — whose name has 
not been ascertained — was soon subsequently settled here, 
and was deposed in 1661, Severe measures for a time were 



182 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

now employed to the great discomfort of Presbyterian 
ministers. We find the congregation vacant in 1670. 
Wodrow relates how they then called Mr. Alexander 
Moncrief, formerly minister of Scoonie, Fifeshire, but he 
declined the call. In January, 1672, they presented a call by 
their commissioners, Alderman Craigie and Mr. Reilly, to 
the Presbytery of Route, for Mr. Thomas Fulton, one of their 
ministers, but the Presbytery would not permit him to 
remove. In the end of the same year, however, they at last 
obtained a settled pastor in Mr. Robert Rule, formerly 
minister of Stirling, and brother of the celebrated Gilbert 
Rule. He continued unmolested in this charge till 1688, 
when he fled to Scotland and never returned. In September, 
1688, they called Mr. Henry, of Carrickfergus, but he did 
not remove. Mr. Robert Craighead was now settled here. 
He was removed from Donaghmore in 1690. During his 
ministry the congregation revived greatly. We now find 
attending Presbytery as elders Aldermen H. Long, W. Smith, 
Lecky, Lennox, and Horace Kennedy. In 1696 they had a 
dispute with Burt about the boundaries of their congx-ega- 
tions. The people of Elagh, Corquin, and Ballynegallagh 
refusing to join with Derry, the Presbytery determined the 
congregation to be limited by the liberties of the city on that 
side. Mr. Craighead growing infirm, the congregation 
called his son, Mr. Robert Craighead, in 1709 — they 
promised d£70 to the old man and =£40 to the young — but 
the call was not accepted. They afterwards called Mr. James 
Bi'uce, of Killyleagh, but the Synod opposed the removal. 
Mr. Craighead, sen., died on the 22nd of August, 1711. In 
1712 they called Mr. Abernethy, of Antrim, but this the 
Synod also opposed. They at length succeeded in obtaining 
Mr. James Blair, of Moira, who was installed here on the 
2nd of June, 1713. He died January 21st, 1716. Being 
again vacant, they once more called Mr. Craighead, now of 
Capel Street, Dublin, but the Synod again prevented his 
removal. The next minister was Mr. Samuel Ross, who was 
ordained here on the 13th of February, 1718. He died in 
this charge on the 26th of October, 1736. At his death the 
congregation disputed respecting a successor, part being for 
Mr. David Harvey, minister of Griendermot, and Mr. Hair, a 
probationer, as colleague ; and part complained that they 
were overlooked in this choice. The former sent to the 
Synod in 1737, as their commissioners, Messrs. Davis and 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 183 

Cross — the latter, Messrs. Moore, Ewing, and Marshall ; but, 
on a conference, both parties agreed to acquiesce in Mr. 
Harvey's call, " on condition that their right of electing a 
colleague to him should be preserved, and a maintenance of 
d640 per annum secured to such colleague." Mr. David 
Harvey was accordingly soon afterwards installed here ; and 
in 1738 they supplicated for supply of probationers to assist 
their pastor. They soon obtained as colleague Mr. John 
Hood, who was ordained here on the 10th of June, 1742. 
Mr. Hood died June 21st, 1774, leaving a widow and family. 
They gave a call to Mr. Campbell, of Armagh, in November, 
1774, but without effect. In 1775 Mr. David Young, 
formerly minister at Enniskillen, removed to this congrega- 
tion, Mr. Harvey demitted his charge here in November, 
1783; and Mr. Eobert Black (afterwards D.D.), formerly 
minister at Dromore, was installed in his room, * as colleague 
to Mr. Young, on the 2nd Tuesday of January, 1784. Mr. 
Harvey died in April, 1794. In 1803 the Presbytery 
reported to the Synod that they had suspended Dr. Young 
sme die. He was succeeded by Mr. Ceorge Hay, who was 
ordained here as colleague to Dr. Black on the 18th of June, 
1805. Dr. Black died, under melancholy circumstances, on 
the 4th of December, 1817, leaving a widow and family ; and 
his place was filled by Mr. John Mitchell, formerly minister 
of Dungiven, who was installed here in August, 1819. On 
the 27th of August, 1823, Mr. Mitchell resigned ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. William M'Clure, who was ordained here 
on the 1st of March, 1825, as colleague to Mr. Hay. Mr. 
Young died about May, 1827. Mr. Hay died June 10th, 
1837 ; and was succeeded by the Rev. Henry Wallace, 
formerly of Cork, who was installed here on the 7th of 
September, 1837, as colleague to Mr. M'Clure. It was 
arranged that the collegiate charge should cease on the death 
or translation of either of these ministers. Mr. Wallace, on 
his appointment as Professor of Christian Ethics in Belfast 
Presbyterian College, resigned this charge on the 6th of 
November, 1867 ; and about the same time Mr. M'Clure 
asked leave for the congregation to choose an assistant and 
successor. On the 21st of May, 1857, Mr. Richard Smyth 
had meanwhile been installed as an assistant here ; but, on 

* Dr. Black, for many years, was the acknowledged leader of the 
Synod of Ulster. He was very lax in his theology ; but he was gifted 
with commanding eloquence. 



184 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

his appointment to a Professorship in Derry College, he 
resigned the charge on the 6th of September, 1865. On the 
18th of March, 1869, Mr. Andrew C. Murphy was installed 
here. Mr. M'Clure died on the 22nd of February, 1874. 
On the 15th of December, 1879, Mr. Murphy resigned this 
charge on his removal to Dublin ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
James Cargin, formerly of Dublin, who was installed here on 
the 27th of January, 1881. 

LONDOKDEEEY 3rd. 

This congregation was established in 1834, and its first 
minister was the Eev. James Denham, who had before been 
minister of Brigh. He was installed here on the 4th of May, 
1837. Mr. Denham (afterwards D.D.) was one of the most 
acceptable ministers of his day ; and under him the con- 
gregation greatly flourished. On the 18th of October, 1870, 
Dr. Denham resigned the pastoral charge, and died on the 
18th of December, 1871. Meanwhile Mr. James Maxwell 
Eodgers, formerly minister of 1st Kilrea (and Moderator of 
the General Assembly in 1885), had been elected his assistant 
and successor, and was installed here on the 18th of March, 
1869. This congregation is now one of the largest con- 
tributors to our Sustentation Fund — its donation for the 
past year (1885) amounting to d8400. 

LONGFOED. 

This congi-egation was erected in 1833, and the first 
minister was Mr. Samuel M'Cutcheon, who was ordained here 
by the Presbytery of Monaghan on the 3rd of June, 1834. 
Mr. M'Cutcheon died on the 23rd of December, 1875 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Alexander Eentoul, who was installed here 
by the Athlone Presbytery on the 11th of May, 1877. On 
the 5th of April, 1881, Mr. Eentoul, on the eve of his 
removal to Dublin, resigned this charge ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. Alfred H. Eentoul, who was ordained here on the 
2lst of May, 1882. 

LOUGHBEICKLAND. 

The name of the first minister of this congregation cannot 
now be ascertained. It was vacant in August, 1687, and 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 185 

shortly afterwards Mr. Jolin Mairs was ordained here. In 
June, 1697, lie was removed to Longford. The next minister 
was Mr. George Lang, son of the minister of Newiy, who 
was ordained here April 15th, 1701. Mr. Lang died May 
29th, 1741. The next minister was Mr. Charles M'Collum, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Dromore on the 
6th of March, 1744. He removed to Capel Street, Dublin, 
in the end of the same year. The next minister was Mr. 
Timothy White, who had been minister at Ballyeaston, and 
who removed here in 1749. On the 12th of September of 
that year he was installed here by the Presbytery of Dromore. 
He died June 5th, 1756 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John 
Smith, who was oi*dained here on the 31st of October, 1757. 
He died May 27th, 1804, leaving a widow and family. The 
next minister was Mr. Hugh M'Alister, who was ordained 
here on the 11th of December, 1804. He died in this charge 
on the 10th of February, 1824, leaving neither widow nor 
family. The next minister was Mr. Robert Little, who was 
ordained here on the 28th of September, 1824. Mr. Little 
died on the 20th of January, 1841 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. William Edmund Breakey, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Banbridge on the 22nd of March, 1842. 
On the 4th of August, 1856, Mr. Breakey resigned the 
charge, and removed to Lisburn ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
Robert Crawford, who was ordained here on the 31st of 
March, 1857. On the 11th of January, 1869, Mr. Crawford 
resigned the charge, and removed to Sinclair Seaman's 
Church, Belfast ; and he was succeeded by Mr. Alexander 
Buchanan, who was ordained here on the 30th of March, 
1869. 

LOUGHGALL. 

This congregation was established in the early part of the 
last century. In 1711 it applied to the Synod of Ulster for 
aid to enable it to support a minister, and £\5 per annum 
was granted to it out of the General Fund. Mr. Hugh 
Wallace appears to have been the first minister. He was 
ordained here on the 10th of October, 1712. He resigned 
this charge and was installed in Castledawson in 1720. He 
was succeeded by Mr. James Orr, who was ordained here on 
the 30th of May, 1722. He died here on the 10th of April, 
1755. The next minister was Mr. Robei-t Peebles, who was 
ordained here on the 26th of June, 1758. He died July 



186 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. • 

31st, 1761 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Moses Hogg, who was 
ordained here on the 25th of August, 1762. Mr. Hogg died 
here on the 23rd of November, 1802, leaving a widow and 
son. His son, Mr. Robert Hogg, succeeded him, and was 
ordained here on the 16th of March, 1803. He died in this 
charge on the 19th of January, 1830,* leaving neither widow 
nor family. The next minister was Mr. William Henry, who 
was ordained here on the 22nd of December, 1830. Mr. 
Henry died on the 20th of January, 1880. Mr. Henry had 
long before obtained an assistant in Mr. Edward Kimmit, 
who was installed here on the 19th of June, 1861. On the 
25th of May, 1880, on his removal to Clonakilty, Mr. 
Kimmit resigned this charge ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William Smyth, formerly of Roscommon, who was installed 
here on the 11th of November, 1880. 

LURGAN 1st. 

The earliest account we have of this congregation is in 
1684, when we find it about to be planted. In 1686 Mr. 
Hugh Kirkpatrick was minister here. He retired to Scot- 
land at the time of the Revolution, and became minister of 
a parish there. His successor was Mr. William Squire, who 
was settled here about 1694. In 1699 it is reported to the 
Synod that " he is wholly gone and continueth in England," 
so that the congregation was considered vacant. The next 
minister was Mr. James Fleming, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Armagh, January 18th, 1704. It was still 
a very weak settlement, and in 1706 we find the sub- Synods 
of Belfast and Monaghan paying =£20 to assist it in support- 
ing a minister. In August, 1718, they obtained a lease of a 
plot of ground, on which they erected a meeting-house. In 
1719, Mr. Fleming received a call from the 1st congregation 
of Belfast. His removal was opposed by his congregation, 
and their commissioners to the Synod were Miles Reilly, 
John M'Call, and others. Mr. Brownlow, the landlord, seems 
to have thought highly of Mr. Fleming — for he wrote a letter 
to the Moderator of the Synod, earnestly pleading for his 
continuance in Lurgan. The Synod resolved that he should 
not be removed ; and, in a letter to Mr. Brownlow, thanked 
him for the kindness which he had shown to Mr. Fleming. 
This minister died in this charge August 16th, 1730. He 

* Mr. Hogg was assistant astronomer in the Armagh Observatory. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 187 

was succeeded by Mr. John Menogh, formerly minister at 
Maglierally, who was settled here in 1732. He died December 
20th, 1771, leaving a widow and family, and was succeeded 
by Mr. Robert Rentoul, who had been ordained by a Scottish 
Presbytery in 1772, and who was installed by the Presbytery 
of Dromore, September 26th, 1773. He removed to Bally- 
kelly in 1779, and was succeeded by Mr. William Magee, who 
was ordained here September 12th, 1780, and died July 9th, 
1800. The widow of this minister inherited great wealth 
from brothers in India, and bequeathed, at her death in 1846, 
about d860,000 to the Irish Presbyterian Church, including 
■£20,000 for the establishment of a Presbyterian College. 
Mr. Magee was succeeded in Lurgan by Mr. Hamilton 
Dobbin, formerly minister of Moira, who was installed here 
January 26th, 1802. Mr. Dobbin having become infirm, Mr. 
Thomas Millar was installed as his assistant and successor, 
on the 1st of October, 1844. Mr. Dobbin died on the 20th 
of October, 1851, and Mr. Millar was killed by a railway 
accident in May, 1858. Mr. Lowry E. Berkely, formerly 
minister of Faughanvale, was installed here on the 21st of 
September, 1858. On his appointment as convener of the 
Sustentation Fund in 1878, Mr. Berkely resigned this charge; 
and was succeeded by Mr. John M'llveen, formerly of Bally- 
nahinch, who was installed here on the 19th of March, 1879. 
On his removal to Linen Hall Street congregation, Belfast, 
Mr. M'llveen resigned this charge ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
Thomas M. Hamill, who was installed here on the 4th of 
March, 1884. 

MACOSQUm. 

There was a settled minister here as early as 1670, but 
his name cannot now be exactly ascertained. Mr. John 
Laurie or Lowry, was minister here in 1688 ; and it would 
appear that he had three predecessors whose names were 
Boyd, Wilson, and Elliot. During the troubles of the Eevo- 
lution Mr. Laurie retired to Scotland, and does not appear to 
have returned. In the meantime the people supplicated to 
be placed under the pastoral care of Mr. Boyd, of Aghadoey. 
This arrangement continued for some time ; but they at 
length obtained the services of Mr. James Stuart, who had 
come from Scotland in 1701 as an ordained minister, and 
who was installed here by the Presbytery of Route on the 
19th of August of that year. In March, 1706 he was sus- 



188 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

pended for various offences apparently proceeding from 
imprudence and ill temper : but the suspension was removed 
by the Synod following. The congregation, notwithstanding, 
remained dissatisfied; and in 1708 he demitted the charge 
and retired to Cushendall. He was succeeded by Mr. William 
Boyd, who was ordpined here on the 31st of January, 1710. 
In 1725 he resigned this charge and removed to the old con- 
gregation of Taughboyne. His successor was Mr. John 
Thompson, who was ordained here on the 21st December, 
1727. In early life Mr. Thompson obtained a commission in 
the army, but coming under deep religious impressions, he 
withdrew from the military profession and entered the Pres- 
byterian ministry. His wife was the daughter of Stephen 
Ash, the descendant of Captain Thomas Ash, one of the 
heroes of the siege of Derry. Mr. Thompson died in this 
charge on the 7th of June, 1771, leaving a widow and 
family.* Mr. Thompson was succeeded by Mr. Robert 
Caldwell, who was ordained here September 1st, 1772, and 
demitted this charge in 1781. Mr. Caldwell was afterwards 
settled at Moville. The next minister was Mr. James 
M'Farlane, who was ordained here on the 1st of August, 
1783. He died April 4th, 1816, leaving a widow and family, 
and was succeeded by Mr. John Patterson, who was ordained 
here on the 2nd September, 1817. On the 10th of September, 
1822, he was suspended for intemperance. The next minister 
was Mr. Clarke Houston (afterwai-ds D.D.), whowas ordained 
here on the 30th of September, 1823. Dr. Houston died 
on the 23rd February, 1866, and was succeeded by Mr. 
Samuel Robinson, who was ordained here on the 28th of 
March, 1867. Mr. Robinson, having received a call from 
California, resigned this charge on the 1st of April, 1873 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. John C. Huston, who was installed 
here on the 8th of July, 1873. Mr. Huston died on the 2nd 
of March, 1881 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Frederic Torrens, 
who was ordained here on the 8th of September, 1881. 

MAGHERA. 

It would appear that Mr. James Kilpatrick officiated as 
minister of Maghera for upwards of twenty years prior to 
the Revolution. In 1690 the people were without a minister. 

* The Rev. E. Thompson Martin, late of Dundonald, is one of his 
descendants. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 189 

We find them noticed in the following minute as supplicatincr 
for a pastor : — " Appeared from Maghera, Kilnonaglian, and 
several other places thereabout, Matthew Lorinan, James 
Garvan, Jo. Vernar, and Daniel Cairns, supplicating that, in 
consideration of their desolate condition as to the want of 
Gospel ordinances, and that they can give sufficient security 
for i25 per annum, heing very hopeful it may grow to more 
after better planting, the four of whom will give security to 
the meeting of Tyrone for the same, they having already built 
a meeting-house, and they further promising here before the 
Synod to pay up to Mr. Abernethy whatever any of the said 
people shall be found due to him — that the Synod Avould be 
pleased to advise and concur with them as to their being 
planted with a minister." The Synod considering this affair 
and finding that Mr. James Eamsay had formerly a call from 
a i^art of the same people, and had passed all his trials upon 
the matter till something fell in that hindered his settlement, 
they then go on to appoint Mr. Eamsay to supply them for 
some Sabbaths in order to a call ; Mr. Eamsay, however, 
refusing to settle thei-e, the people called Mr. John Tomb of 
the Eoute Presbytery, who is advised to go, in the first place, 
to Scotland for laureation. This being done, he is settled 
here in 1696. He was succeeded by Mr. Archibald Boyd, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Tyrone on the 
28th of October, 1703. He was set aside'in 1716. The next 
minister was Mr. James Dykes, who was ordained here on 
the 25th of May, 1720. He died in this charge on the 19th 
December, 1734. The people then gave a call to Mr. Eobert 
Knox, a probationer under the care of the Presbytery of 
Eoute, but he died after having passed through second trials, 
previous to his ordination. The next minister was Mr. David 
Smylie, who had been ordained by the Presbytery of Eoute 
in Finvoy, and who removed here in the end of the year 1739. 
Mr. Smylie becoming infirm, Mr. John Glendy was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Eoute in December, 1778. Mr. 
Smylie died August 1st, 1780, leaving a family. It was re- 
poi'ted to the Synod in 1798 that '' Mr. Glendy, being charged 
with seditious practices, was permitted by Colonel Leith to 
transport himself and property to America."* After much 
disputing Mr. Charles Kennedy was ordained here on the 29th 

* Mr. Glendy subsequently became rather a distinguished minister 
in the Presbyterian Church of the United States. \Ylien minister of 
Maghera, Henry Cooke (afterwards D.D., LL.D.)was baptized by him. 



190 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

of July, 1801. Mr. Kennedy becoming infirm, Mr. Smylie 
Robson was ordained his assistant and successor on the 16th 
of June, 1843. On the 20th of February of the following 
year Mr. Robson resigned the charge and became a missionary 
to the Jews. He was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Witherow, who 
was ordained here on the 1st of October, 1845. Mr. Kennedy 
died on the 8th of February, 1855. Mr. Witherow (now D.D.) 
having been appointed Professor of Church History in Magee 
College in 1865, resigned this charge, and was succeeded by 
Mr. Matthew Leitch, who was ordained to the pastoral charge 
on the 2nd of October, 1866. Mr. Leitch, on his appoint- 
ment as Professor of Biblical Criticism in Belfast Presby- 
terian College in 1879, was succeeded by Mr. Robert H. F. 
Dickey, who was ordained here on the 26th of January, 1880. 

MAGHERAFELT 1st. 

This congregation originally formed part of Moneymore. 
There was an attempt made to have it erected into a separate 
charge as early as 1692. This, however, did not succeed. It 
was then annexed to Castledawson, and continued thus for 
many years. At length in 1737 Messrs. Robert Rainey and 
William Johnson appeared as Commissioners before the 
Synod, and stated that Magherafelt, being a large town in 
which there were 56 families of Dissenters, they ought to 
have a place of worship and not be obliged to travel two 
miles to Castledawson. The Synod of Ulster, however, still 
continued it in connexion with Castledawson ; but allowed 
them half of the services of the minister of Castledawson. 
In 1738, however, differences between this congregation and 
that of Castledawson continued, and the Synod erected it 
into a separate charge, appointing Mr. Wallace, who had 
previously preached in Castledawson, as the minister, and 
adding 50 families to it which formerly belonged to Money- 
more. This handing over of families from one congregation 
to another by Synodical authority would now be considered 
a very strange procedure. Mr. Wallace died in this charge 
on the 10th of March, 1761. He was succeeded by Mr. 
William Wilson, who was ordained here on the 19th of 
November, 1765. In 1785 he removed to Usher's Quay, 
Dublin. He was succeeded by Mr. George Dugald, who was 
ordained on the 30th of May, 1786. He died in this charge 
on the 9th of December, 1810, leaving a widow and family. 



HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 191 

The next minister was Mr. James Wilson, who was ordained 
here on the 24th of September, 1813. Mr. Wilson died on 
the 10th of June, 1854. The next minister was Mr. Alexan- 
der Montgomery, who was installed here on the 20th of 
September, 1854. 

MAGHEEALLY. 

The first minister of this congi-egation was Mr. Andrew 
Maccormick. He was here in 1656, and was known to Living- 
ston at that date. He was deposed in 1660, and, flying to 
Scotland, was killed at the battle of Pentland Hills in 1666. 
His successor was Mr. John Hunter. He was here in 1672, 
but fled to Scotland at the Eevolution of 1688, and never 
returned. He was minister of Ayr and Alloway from 1690 
to 1696. The next minister was Mr. James Heron, ordained 
here November 1st, 1693. He died in the beginning of the 
year 1699. His successor was Mi-. Samuel Young, who was 
ordained by the Presbytery of Armagh, February 16th, 1704. 
He resigned the charge here and went to America in 1718. 
He was succeeded by Mr. John Menogh, who settled here 
about 1722. He removed to Lurgan in 1733. The next 
minister was Mr. James Moody, who was ordained here by 
the Presbytery of Armagh, May 28th, 1734. In 1740, Mr. 
Moody removed to Newry, and was succeeded by Mr. William 
Thompson, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Armagh, October 20th, 1742, and died November 8th, 1756. 
The next minister was Mr. Isaac Patrick, who was ordained 
here June 22nd, 1758. Becoming infirm, Mr. Alexander Patter- 
son, formerly minister of Drumbanagher, was installed as his 
assistant and successor, November 12th, 1805. Mr. Patrick 
died in October, 1814, leaving a widow and family. When 
Mr. Patterson became infirm, Mr. Samuel Marcus Dill 
(afterwards Professor of Divinity in Magee College) was 
ordained as his assistant on the 7th of April, 1835. Mr. 
Dill resigned this charge September 5th, 1837, and removed 
to Hillsborough. He was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Boyd, 
who was installed here by the Presbytery of Dromore, March 
27th, 1839. Mr. Boyd resigned this charge June 3rd, 1839, 
and removed to Castleblayney. He was succeeded by Mr. 
James Thompson (formerly of Bally nahinch), who was in- 
stalled here February 26, 1840. Mr. Patterson died 9th 
April, 1845. Mr. Thompson becoming infirm, Mr. J. D. 
Martin was ordained here on the 20th of March, 1883. Mr. 
Thompson died on the 27th of October of the same year. 



192 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 

MAGILLIGAK 

In the year 1812 the inhabitants of this district supplicated 
to be erected by the Synod of Ulster into a separate congre- 
gation. This request was granted in the following year. 
The first minister was Mr. Samuel Butler, who was ordained 
here on the 15th of September, 1814. * Becoming infirm, his 
nephew, Mr. Hugh M'Intyre Butler, was ordained as his 
assistant and successor on the 16th of December, 1851. Mr. 
Butler, sen., died on the 9th of January, 1862. 

M AGUIEE SBEIDaE. 

In the year 1820 the inhabitants of this place belonging 
to the congregation of Enniskillen supplicated the Synod of 
Ulster to be erected into a distinct congregation, stating that 
they were seven miles from Enniskillen, and enjoyed divine 
service only every fifth Sabbath. The application was 
granted in 1821 ; the people engaged to pay a minister c£59 
per annum. The first minister was Mr. James M'Williams, 
who was ordained here on the 14th November, 1822. This 
congregation did not obtain Regmm Bonum until 1827. Mr. 
M'Williams died on the 20th of April, 1860 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Henry Cowan, who was ordained here on the 
11th of September, 1860. On the 5th of October, 1865, Mr. 
Cowan resigned the charge of the congregation, having 
accepted a call from the congregation of Newbliss ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Samuel Huston Thompson, who was 
ordained here on the 29th of December, 1865. On the 6th 
of April, 1869, Mr. Thompson resigned the charge ; and on 
the 20th July of the same year Mr. John H. Charleton was 
installed as the minister. Mr. Charlton resigned this charge 
on his removal to Clonduff in Januaxy, 1882 ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. John Sturgeon, formerly of Trenta, who was 
installed here on the 22nd of August, 1882. 

MALIN. 

The earliest notice we have of this congregation is con- 
nected with the ordination of Mr. John Harvey, jun., on the 
23rd of October, 1717. He died in this charge on the 7th of 
February, 1 733. He was succeeded by Mr. John Montgomery, 

* Mr. Butler published a volume of sermons. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 193 

who was installed here on the 8th of October, 1734. He 
appears to have resigned in 1737, though he continued a 
member of the Presbytery. Complaint was made in 1748 
that he neither attended public worship nor the judicatories 
of the church. The Presbytery of Derry was ordered to 
enquire as to the grounds of this complaint, but Mr. Mont- 
gomery died on the 14th of March, 1749, and thus there 
appears to have been no investigation. Meanwhile Mr. David 
Walker was ordained towards the end of the year 1738. He 
continued here till his death, which occurred on the 21st of 
July, 1766. Another Mr. David Walker was ordained here 
on the 10th of October, 1768. He died in the end of May, 
1782. The congregation was now for several years xmder the 
care of Mr. Scott of Donagh. At length, on the 23rd of 
March, 1798, Mr. James Canning was ordained to the pastoral 
charge. He died on the 13th of May, 1830. He was suc- 
ceeded by his son Mr. John Canning who was ordained here 
on the 14th of March, 1832. Mr. Canning died on the 26th 
of November, 1877 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Joseph 
Thompson, who was ordained hereon the 13th of June, 1878. 
On the 3rd of September, 1878, Mr. Thompson resigned this 
charge ; and was succeeded by Mr. George W. Neely, who 
was installed here on the 20th of November of the same year. 
Mr. Neely resigned the charge on his appointment as a Mis- 
sionary to New South Wales, in January, 1882 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Archibald Henderson, who was installed 
here on the 4th of April, 1882, 

MAEKETHILL 1st. 

The first minister here of whom we have any account was 
Mr. Archibald Maclaine, who was installed here by the 
Presbytery of Armagh about 1700. He was the first Pres- 
byterian minister in this country prosecuted by the Bishop's 
Court for celebrating marriage — though, as stated by Macbride 
in his work on the subject, he had episcopal ordination. He 
had previously been minister of Killbride in Arran. He was 
able to preach in Irish. He died in this charge on the 20th 
of July, 1734. After this the congregation divided. Those 
who adhered to the old meeting-house offered a stipend of 
<£40 per annum and 20 bolls of oats — a boll being equal to 
six bushels. Those who adhered to the new meeting-house 
offered security for c£30 and 15 bolls of oats. Both suppli- 

M 



194 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

cated to be erected into distinct congregations, and their 
requests were granted. Mr. George Ferguson was ordained 
here on the 10th of March, 1741. Mr. Ferguson growing 
infirm, Mr. Samuel Sloan was ordained here June 18th, 1780, 
as his assistant and successor. Mr. Ferguson died on the 
6th of June, 1782. Mr. Sloan died on the 25th of March, 
] 793 ; and was succeeded by Mr. William Charleton, who 
was ordained here on the 19th of March, 1794. On June 
15th, 1808, the connection between Mr. Charleton and the 
congregation was dissolved by the Presbytery. The next 
minister was Mr. Paul Boreland, who was ordained here on 
the 26th September, 1809. Becoming prematurely infirm, 
Mr. John Fisher was ordained his assistant and successor on 
the 23rd of June, 1828. Mr. Boreland died on the 15th of 
July, 1831, leaving a widow and family. On the 25th of 
March, 1842, Mr. Fisher was suspended from the office of 
the ministry. He was succeeded as minister of Markethill 
by Mr. Alexander Goudy Eoss, * who was ordained here on the 
15th of June, 1843. Mr. Eoss died on the 24th of February., 
1858 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Hillis Kyle, who was 
ordained here on the 29th of September, 1858. Mr. Kyle 
died on the 24th of November, 1860. His successor was Mr. 
George Nesbitt, formerly minister of Tartaraghan, who wa^ 
installed here on the 29th of May, 1861. 

MILFOED. 

This congregation was erected by the Presbytery of Letter- 
kenny on the 15th of May, 1837. The first minister was 
Mr. Eobert White, who was ordained on the 7th of 
December, 1837. Mr. White died on the 14th of January, 
1873 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Hugh MacCulloch, who 
was ordained here on the 1st of October, 1873. Mr. 
MacCulloch, having accepted a call from Buncrana, resigned 
the pastoral charge on the 5th of January, 1881 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. William James Young, who was ordained 
here on the 27th of July of the same year. 

MILLISLE. 

The early history of this congregation is buried in obscurity, 

* Mr. Ross was the son of a respectable merchant in Monaghan, 
from whom he inherited a small estate. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 195 

and few records remain to thi-ow liglit on the subject. We 
know, however, that Mr. Aaidrew Greer was ordained here 
by the Presbytery of Belfast on the 20th of May, 1771. Mr. 
Greer becoming infirm, Mr. John Walker was ordained his 
assistant and successor on the 13th of April, 1810. In 1814 
Mr. Walker was deposed. The next minister was Mr. John 
Hanna, who was ordained here on the first Tuesday of May, 
181S. Mr. Greer died on the 6th of April, 1819, leaving neither 
widow nor family. Becoming infirm, Mr. Hanna, in 1847, 
obtained leave for his congregation to choose an assistant 
and successor ; and, on the 2nd of March, 1848, Mr. John 
M'Auley was ordained here. Mr. Hanna died on the 4th of 
January, 1850. 

MINTEEBUEN. 

This congregation being in the parish of Aghaloo, in 
Tyrone, was originally known by that name. The first 
minister was Mr. John Abernethy, who was ejected in 1661. 
He then removed to Brigh. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Joshua Fisher, who had been licensed by the Presbytei'y of 
Antrim in 1675, and who settled here shortly afterwards. 
He retired from this at the Eevolution, supj^lied Ballymena 
for a time, and was finally settled at Donoughmore, near 
Eaphoe. In September, 1691, we find the commissioner of 
this congregation, named Timothy Greer, supplicating for 
supplies at ten shillings a day till they obtained a minister. 
Mr. William Ambrose was ordained here by the Presbytery 
of Down in 1693. In 1714 this congregation was divided. 
Part went to form an erection at Teugh, or Glennan ; part 
worshipped at Minterburn, whilst part continued at Kinnaird 
or Lisluney — the original settlement. Mr. Ambrose died 
towards the end of the year 1714. He was succeeded by 
Mr. Alexander Moor, who was ordained here on the 8th of 
October, 1716. He died on the 8th of July, 1724, and his 
tombstone is still said to be in Benburb churchyard. He 
appears to have been succeeded by Mr. William Eay, but 
some obscurity rests on this part of the history of the con- 
gregation. Alter this great disputes prevailed. In 1743 
the result of a poll between two rival candidates, Messrs. 
Alexander Cumin and Adam Dufiin, was reported to the 
Synod, but neither party succeeded. After much contention 
Mr. John Ker was at length ordained here by the Presbytery 
of Tyrone on the 9th of October, 1745. He died in this 



196 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

charge on the 11th of December, 1778. He was succeeded 
by Mr. Robert Rogers, who was ordained here on the 12th of 
November, 1782, and who removed to Corboy in March, 
1785. The next minister was Mr. Hugh Boylan, who was 
ordained hereon the 15th of November, 1785. He died here 
on the 9th of October, 1807, leaving a widow and family. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Andrew Shannon, who was ordained 
here on the 20th of December, 1808, and died on the 22nd of 
February, 1811. The next minister was Mr. Robert Cunning- 
ham, who was ordained here on the 24th of September, 1812. 
He died in this charge on the 29th of June, 1828 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. James Collins, who was ordained here on 
the 26th of May, 1829. Mr. Collins died on the 23rd of 
December, 1849 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Alexander 
Gray, who was installed here on the 17th of December, 
1850. Mr. Gray (now LL.D.) i-emoved to Belfast in May, 
1865 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Andrew James Wilson, who 
was ordained here on the 26th of September, 1865. On the 
27th of September, 1883, Mr. Wilson resigned this charge 
on his removal to Malone ; and was succeeded by Mr. Daniel 
Manderson, who was ordained here on the 8th of January, 
1884. 

MOIRA. 

This is a congregation of ancient origin. It appears to 
have been in existence at the Revolution, but we do not know 
who was then the minister. It was vacant in April, 1692. 
The people then called Mr. Matthew Haltridge, minister at 
Ahoghill, but the Presbytery would not permit him to remove. 
Mr. Samuel Ferguson was ordained here towards the end of 
the year 1693. He died in this charge on the 21st November, 
1703. In 1706 the people supplicated the Synod that, con- 
sidering they were yet but a weak settlement, they would add 
to them some adjacent families then joined to Lisburn and 
Glenavy. They were still vacant in 1708. At last they ob- 
tained Mr. James Blair as their minister, and he was ordained 
here on the 17th of May, 1709. He was removed to Deny 
in June, 1713. His successor was Mr. Samuel Harpur, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Belfast, on the 13th 
of March, 1717. In 1731 they supplicated the Synod that, 
as they were lately deprived of their meeting-house, assistance 
might be given them to build a new one. This was granted, 
and they were annexed to the Presbytery of Armagh. Mr. 



HISTOEY OF CONGREGATIONS. 197 

Harpur joined the Presbytery of Antrim in 1726, and had 
probably died before this application to the Synod. The 
next minister was Mr. Thomas Creighton, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Armagh on the 27th of May, 1734. 
In 1738 they built their meeting-house. Mr. Creighton died 
in this charge on the 29th of December, 1741. The Seceders 
now made their appearance in Ireland, and occupied the 
Moira meeting-house. This created much trouble. The 
congregation now remained long vacant on account of their 
poverty. The next minister was Mr. Joseph Mitchell, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Bangor on the 29th 
of October, 1751. In 1752 the people complained that their 
meeting-house was seized by the Seceders, and that they had 
been at considerable expense in a law-suit for its recovery. 
In 1760 the Seceders still had the house, and the people again 
api^ly to the Synod for assistance. Mr. Mitchell died on the 
6th of October, 1774, leaving a widow and children ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. William Stitt, who was ordained here on 
the 10th of October, 1775. He removed to Dungannon in 
September, 1777; and was succeeded by Mr. Andrew Craig, 
who was ordained here on the 30th of June, 1778. He re- 
moved to Lisburn in 1783, and was succeeded by Mr. D. 
Trotter, who was ordained here on the 23rd of June, 1783. 
He removed to Summerhill ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
George Dobbin, who was ordained here on the 1st of May, 
1792. He died in this charge on the 21st of December, 
1796, leaving a widow and family; and was succeeded by 
Mr. John Cochrane Wightman, who was ordained here on 
the 20th of March, 1798. In 1800 he removed to 1st Holy- 
wood ; and was succeeded by Mr. Hamilton Dobbin, who was 
ordained here on the 10th of June, 1801. He removed to 
Lurgan in January, 1802. The next minister was Mr. John 
Mulligan, who was ordained here on the last Tuesday of 
November, 1802. Mr. Mulligan joined the Remonstrants in 
1829, and died not long afterwards. The Seceders still kept 
up their interest in the place, and had established a congrega- 
tion there, to which those who remained with the Synod of 
Ulster finally adhered. At the union in 1840 Mr. William 
Moffat was the minister, but not long afterwards he obtained 
as his assistant Mr. Robert Moorhead, who was ordained 
here on the 7th of November, 1843. Mr. Moorhead resigned 
the charge on the 23rd of September, 1844 ; and on the 2nd 
of April, 1845, Mr. Robert Scott Erwin was ordained here. 



198 HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

Mr. Erwin in a short time removed to Cargycreevy ; and on 
the 2nd of January, 1850, Mr. Samuel Graham was ordained 
to the i^astoral charge. Mr. Moffat died on the 25th of 
October, 1853. 

MONAGHAN 1st. 

The first minister we find here is Mr. Eobert Darragh. 
He appears to have been ordained about 1697. He had an 
unhappy career ; and in 1712 he was degraded by the Synod 
for drunkenness and other irregular conduct. In 1715 the 
people called Mr. Michael Bruce of Holywood, and sent 
Messrs. Samuel Black, William Porter, John Gilmer, George 
Armstrong, James M'Conkey, and John Fee as their com- 
missioners to the Synod to prosecute the call. The Synod 
decided that Mr. Bruce should remain in Holywood. The 
people at length obtained as their minister Mr. Thomas 
MacLaine, son of Mr. MacLaine of Markethill. He was 
ordained here March 19th, 1718. He died in this charge on 
the llth of November, 1740. After his death the congrega- 
tion was much disti-acted. In 1742 Messrs. Dacre Hamilton 
and John Porter were commissioners to the Synod. In 1744 
Mr. David Hutchinson of Breaky was removed here ; and in 
September, 1757, he was removed to Cox-k. He was succeeded 
in Monaghan by Mr. James Hamilton, formerly of Dundonald, 
who was installed here in 1758. He removed to Waterford 
in October, 1775. The next minister was Mr. Matthew 
Trumble, who was ordained here on the 24th of June, 1776. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. John Adams was ordained his assistant 
on the 3rd of February, 1818. On the 1st of August, 1820, 
Mr. Adams resigned his charge and removed to Strabane. 
Mr. Trumble died on the 28th of February, 1821. The next 
minister was Mr. John Bleckley, * who was ordained here on 
the 21st of February, 1821, a few days before the death of 
Mr. Trumble. Mr. Bleckley becoming infirm, Mr. J. A. 
Allison was ordained here on the 16th September, 1873. 
Mr. Bleckley died on the 1st of December, 1873. 

MONEYMOEE 1st. 

The first minister of whom we have any account in this 
congregation is Mr. John Abemethy, who accepted a call 

* Mr. Bleckley taught an Academy in Monaghan. He was an 
excellent scholar, an eloquent preacher, and an influential minister. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 199 

from Moneymore in 1684, in preference to one which he had 
from Antrim. Mr. Abemethy had formerly been minister of 
Aghaloo, or Minterburn, in the Presbytery of Tyrone, and 
had been ejected after the Restoration of Charles II. He 
was then for some time minister of Brigh before his removal 
to Moneymore. He was the father of Mr. Abemethy, of 
Dublin, author of the celebrated sermons. At the Revolu- 
tion, Mr. Abernethy, of Moneymore, had the honour of being 
sent by the Irish Presbyterian ministers to London, as one 
of their deputies, to wait on King William III. In September, 
1691, he resigned the charge of Moneymore. The Presby- 
terians of Magherafelt and Moneymore had at one time been 
united under his ministry ; but the people of Magherafelt 
meanwhile were formed into a separate congx-egation. When 
Mr. Abernethy resigned the charge, the people of Moneymore 
were recommended by the Presbytery to join with those of 
Cookstown, under the ministry of Mr. M'Kenzie. They were 
willing to agree to this arrangement ; and, at the Synod 
held in April, 1692, they offered Mr. M'Kenzie =£20 per 
annum, with Mr. Abernethy' s farm and dwelling-house, 
provided they enjoyed "two parts of his labours ;" but the 
proposal was not accepted. In 1697 Mr. Henry Crooks, son 
of Mr. Crooks, minister of Ballykelly, was settled in Money- 
more. He demitted the charge in September, 1734. The 
next minister was Mr. Charles Caldwell, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Tyrone May 16th, 1738. At the 
following Synod twenty-three families begged to be annexed 
to other congregations, as " they could not live under Mr. 
Caldwell's ministry." Mr. Caldwell died March 28th, 1780 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. William Moore, who was ordained 
here May 14th, 1782. Mr. Moore becoming infirm, after 
much disputation Mr. John Barnett (afterwards D.D.) was 
ordained as his assistant and successor June 19th, 1827. 
Mr. Moore died May 27th, 1837, leaving neither widow nor 
family. Dr. Barnett becoming infirm, Mr. William M'Kean 
was ordained as his assistant on the 26th of March, 1872. 
Mr. M'Kean, on his removal to Raphoe, resigned this charge ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. William Reid, who was installed 
here on the 18th of December, 1876. Dr. Barnett died on 
the 4th of January, 1880. 



200 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

MONEEAGH, Co. Donegal. 

This congregation was originally known by the name of 
tlie parish in which it was — viz., Tahoin or TaucjJiboyne. It 
was early settled with Preshyterians. The Covenant was 
solemnly administered here by Messrs. "Weir and Adair in 
the latter end of April, 1644. On that occasion an extra- 
ordinary concourse assembled here from fifteen miles round, 
and took the Covenant. The first minister, Mr. Eobert 
Cunningham, who had been a Conformist, was settled in this 
place in 1645. In 1655 he was succeeded by Mr. John Hart. 
Mr. Hart was deposed in 1661 by Leslie, Bishop of Raphoe, 
and cast into pi'ison with three other ministers in 1664. He 
remained in confinement for six years. In 1670 he was 
liberated, and he was here in 1685. He probably either died 
soon afterwards, or removed to Scotland at the breaking out 
of the troubles prior to the Revolution. In 1688 the people 
gave a call to Mr. Leggatt, of Dromore. The next minister 
was Mr. Neil Gray. He had been minister at Clogher, but 
removed from it at the troubles, and had taken up his abode 
at Taboin in the latter end of 1689. His former congregation 
applied to the Synod in 1691 for his restoration to them. 
The people of Taboin resisted, sending Messrs. Walter 
Patterson and James Marshall as their commissioners to the 
Synod. The subject was resumed at the Synod in 1692, Mr. 
John Bratton being commissioner from Taboin. It was 
finally settled that, because of his valetudinary state, he 
should be permitted to remain at Taboin. His health, how- 
ever, continuing to decline, Mr. William Gray was ordained 
as his assistant and successor on the 18th of October, 1699. 
Mr. Neil Gray, however, did not die till March 3rd, 1715. 
Mr. William Gray was suspended by his Pi-esbytery for 
having been married irregularly about four years before. 
He was required to acknowledge his sin before his congrega- 
tion in presence of a minister sent thither for that purpose, 
and he fulfilled this requirement. In 1721 the congregation 
of Usher's Quay, Dublin, called him to be their minister. 
The call was opposed by the commissioners of the congrega- 
tion of Taboin, who were Messrs. John M'Clintock, Jo. 
Moderell, and Robert Wilson ; but the Synod determined in 
favour of his removal to Dublin. Soon after the congregation 
fell into disputes with the Presbytery of Derry, and divided 
among themselves. In 1723 a new erection was formed at 



HISTORY OF CONGKEGATIONS. 201 

St. Jolinston, Mr. William Gray, who had returned from 
Dublin, being the minister. The next minister of Monreagh 
"was Mr. William Boyd, formerly minister at Macosquin, who 
was installed here on the 25th of April, 1725, The divisions 
between this and the new congregation still continued, and 
led to Q. pro-re-nata meeting of Synod in December, 1727, to 
consider the case. The commissioners from the Session here 
were Messrs. John M'Clintock, Tasker Keys, Walter Marshall, 
and Robert Wilson. Mr. Boyd was joined to the Presbytery 
of Route. The people now built a meeting-house at Mon- 
reagh, and secured to Mr. Boyd d£40 per annum. He died 
May 2nd, 1772, leaving a family. The next minister was 
Mr. Pat Davison, from Scotland, who was installed here by 
the Presbytery of Route on the 9th of January, 1776. He 
was suspected as having a leaning to New Light doctrine, 
and having demitted the charge he returned to Scotland in 
October, 1786. He was succeeded by Mr. Moses Goorley, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Derry on the 
1st of November, 1787. He resigned this charge and went 
to America in August, 1794. After a long vacancy, Mr. 
Matthew Heron was ordained to the pastoral charge here on 
the 2nd of June, 1801. Mr. Heron becoming infirm, Mr. 
Andrew Long was ordained as his assistant and successor on 
the 24th of July, 1845. Mr. Heron died on the 27th of 
March, 1846. Mr. Long becoming infirm, Mr. James 
Latimer was ordained as his assistant and successor on the 
21st of October, 1869. Mr. Long died soon afterwards. Mr. 
Latimer, having received a call from America, resigned this 
charge on the 24th of December, 1873 ; and on the 27th of 
May, 1874, Mr. William Thompson was ordained here. Mr. 
Thompson resigned this charge in November, 1882 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Hugh Cairns, who was ordained here on 
the 12th of April, 1883. 

MOUNTMELLICK. 

The origin of a Presbyterian Congregation here is not 
known, but it seems to have enjoyed occasional services from 
the ministers of Aughmacart and Ballybrittas, two consider- 
able congregations in Queen's County, in the early part of 
the last century. At the close of the century, or about 1796, 
these congregations became extinct on the death of the 
ministers ; and the large tracts of land held in fee for their 



202 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

use for one peppercorn a year not being looked after, were 
lost to the Presbyterian Churcli. Authentic documents show 
that there existed around Mountmellick as centre, congrega- 
tions at Portarlington, Mountrath, Cullohill, Athy, The Leap, 
Eahue, and Edenderry, all having some landed projjerty at- 
tached at a nominal rent, but from neglect passed into the 
hands of others. How these churches were broken up has 
not been clearly ascertained ; but it is supposed the rebellion 
of 1798 caused the departure of many members, and as that 
was a period of general deadness in religion, internal decline 
had also its influence. In 1820 the Secession Synod estab- 
lished a mission in Mountmellick, and after supplying it for 
a time with licentiates, the peojile presented a call to the Rev. 
Thomas Clarke, who was ordained here by the Rev. David 
Stuart, D.D., Dublin ; the Rev. Joseph Lowry, Lissara ; and 
the Rev. John Coulter, Grilnahirk (a commission appointed 
by the Synod), on September 25th, 1829. Mr. Clarke la- 
boured with great zeal and acceptance, until he resigned his 
charge in 1831, on receiving a call from Magherahamlet, 
County Down, where he ministered till his death, in June, 
1861. After his resignation, the circumstances of Mount- 
mellick were never so encouraging as to warrant the Synod 
in ordaining a successor; but, at considerable expense, they 
continued to supply the station with some of their ablest 
licentiates, amongst whom the names of Rentoul, Bell, and 
others, are still held in grateful recollection by the old 
members. Finally, the place was abandoned even as a 
mission station. In 1843 a highly-respectable family settled 
here from the north of Scotland, and some other Scotch 
people arrived not long afterwards. About this time the Rev. 
J. Edmonds, itinerant missionary of the General Assembly, 
visited the town, discovered the nucleus of a congregation, 
established a fortnightly service, and under his care a con- 
gregation was organised. On the 6th of August, 1846, the 
Rev. David Greer was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Athone. Mr. Greer received a call to the Mariners' Church, 
Belfast, and resigned his charge of Mountmellick on the 7th 
August, 1849. Mr. Greer afterwards emigrated to America, 
in connection with the Colonial Mission. After some years 
he passed into the United States, and settled at Dickenson, 
Pennsylvania, near to which was fought the battle of Gettys- 
burgh. After that terrible battle his church was for some 
weeks turned into an hospital. He then returned to Ii*eland, 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 203 

and settled at Cavanaleck. After the departure of Mr. Greer 
from Mountmellick it was placed under the care of the Rev. 
Henry M'Manus, the Assembly's missionary to the Irish- 
speaking Roman Catholic population, who was then in infirm 
health, and the congregation was transferred from the Presby- 
tery of Athlone to that of Dublin. In 1851, James Gibson, Esq.,* 
was appointed Chairman of Queen's County, and through 
his influence the congregation obtained the present site for 
their church and manse, having previously been without any 
church of their own. On the 6th September, 1853, Mr. 
M'Manus was installed pastor by the Presbytery of Dublin ; 
on the same day, William Todd, Esq., Dublin, laid the 
foundation-stone of the new church ; and on the 27th August, 
1854, the edifice was opened for divine worship by Dr. Morgan 
of Belfast. Owing to ill health, Mr. M'Manus resigned the 
congregation on the 7th of April, 1858. He died in Dublin, 
1864. A very interesting work appeared from his pen the 
year before his death, entitled " Sketches of the Irish High- 
lands." The congregation, after the resignation of Mr. 
M'Manus, presented a call to the Rev. Robert Harshaw, then 
assistant-minister at Mullingar, who was installed here on 
the 22nd of March, 1859. 

MOUNTJOY. 

The history of this congregation — formerly called Cross- 
roads — is somewhat obscure. It had a minister upwards 
of a century ago, for it would appear that Mr. James 
Patton was settled here in 1775. Mr. James M'Clintock 
was ordained here at Cappagh on the 24th of May, 1791. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. John Hamilton was ordained as his 
assistant on the 6th of November, 1821. Mr. M'Clintock 
died in December, 1849. Mr. Hamilton resigned the active 
duties of the ministry, and was succeeded by Mr. John 
Gilmour, who was ordained here as his assistant on the 9th 
of September, 1862. Mr. Hamilton died on the 18th of 
June, 1874. 

MOURNE. 

The first minister of whom we read in connection with 

* Mr. Gibson, who was for some time M.P. for Belfast, was a 
gentleman of distinguished zeal and piety. He frequently sat, as an 
elder, in the General Assembly. 



204 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

this congregation was Mr. Charles Wallace. He was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Down on the 21st July, 
1696. After a ministry of forty years he died in this charge 
on the 12th of July, 1736. In 1739 a part of the congrega- 
tion, assembling at the new meeting-house, supplicated to be 
erected into a distinct congregation. The place was now 
long vacant. At length Mr. Andrew Kennedy was ordained 
at Mourne by the Presbytery of Armagh on the 24th of 
February, 1741. His ministry was also of about forty years' 
duration. He died on the 9th of October, 1781, leaving a 
family only. The next minister was Mr. Moses Thompson, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Dromore on the 
22nd July, 1783. He died in this charge on the 21st of 
March, 1800, leaving a widow and child. He was succeeded 
by Mr. John M'llwaine, who was installed here on the 23rd 
of December, 1800. He died in this charge on the 16th of 
March, 1839. The next minister was Mr. James Alfred 
Canning, who was installed here on the 26th of November, 
1839. On the 10th of March, 1848, Mr. Canning resigned 
the charge, having received a call from the 2nd congregation 
of Coleraine ; and on the 6th of March, 1849, Mr. Samuel 
Mateer was ordained to the pastoral charge. Mr. Mateer 
becoming infirm, Mr. David Wilson was installed here on the 
21st September, 1881. On his removal to Dungannon, Mr. 
Wilson resigned this charge ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
William E. Campbell, who was ordained here on the 18th of 
September, 1885, but he died after preaching only a few 
Sabbaths. He was succeeded by the Rev. William M'Mordie, 
formerly of Tandragee, who was installed here on the 16th 
of March, 1886. 

MOVILLE. 

The first notice we have of this congregation is on the 
occasion of the settlement of Mr. Thomas Harvey, jun., who 
was ordained here on the 26th of July, 1715. In 1718 he 
removed to Donagh. In 1720 the people gave a call to Mr. 
James Wallace, minister at Moywater or Killala, promising 
him as stipend ^620 in money and oats by their commissioner, 
Mr. William Rankin. The Synod permitted him to accept 
the call, and he was installed here shortly afterwards. He 
died in this charge on the 21st of February, 1727. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Thomas Harvey, son of Mr. Harvey of 
Donagh. Mr. Harvey died here on the 13th of March, 1747. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 205 

The next minister was Mr. Jolin Cochrane, who was ordained 
here on the 3rd of July, 1750. He demitted this charge on 
the 20th of April, 1754, and died on the 21st of June, 1762. 
The next minister was Mr. Henry M'Kinley, who was 
ordained here on the 4th of March, 1766. He was succeeded 
by Mr. Robert Caldwell, who had been minister at Macosquin, 
but who, through temporary aberration of mind, had been 
obliged to resign that charge in 1781. He was installed here 
on the 16th of November, 1784. Becoming infirm, Mr. 
William M'Clenaghan was ordained here as his assistant and 
successor on the 19th of December, 1820. Mr. Caldwell died 
in January, 1823, leaving a widow and family ; and Mr. 
M'Clenaghan died in January, 1824, leaving neither widow 
nor family. The next minister was Mr. Hugh Mills, who 
was ordained here on the 22nd of June, 1824. He died here 
on the 21st of November, 1832, leaving neither widow nor 
family. He was succeeded by Mr. Andrew Clements, who 
was ordained here on the 26th of December, 1833. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. Clements in 1860 obtained leave for his congre- 
gation to choose an assistant and successor. On the 22nd of 
November, 1861, the Eev. John Bell was ordained to the 
pastoral charge. Mr. Clements died in the spring of 1867. 

MULLINGAE. 

In 1821 certain inhabitants of Mullingar and Tyrell's 
Pass supplicated the Synod of Ulster to be erected into a 
congregation, and promised to pay a stipend of <£54 per 
annum. The congregation was accordingly organised, and 
the first minister was Mr. Alexander Gibson, who was 
ordained here on the 19th of March, 1823. Mr. Gibson was 
suspended from the ministry on the 8th of February, 1858. 
The next minister was Mr. R. H. Harshaw, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Athlone on the 7th of December, 
1858. Mr. Harshaw held this charge a very short time — as 
he resigned it on the 3rd of March, 1859, and removed to 
Mountmellick. Mr. Gibson died on the 12th of June, 1862 ; 
and on the 2nd of July of the same year Mr. Matthew 
Murphy, who had previously been ordained as a missionary 
for the district, was installed as the minister of this con- 
gregation. 



206 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

NEWRY 1st. 

We have no account of any minister here "before Mr. 
George Lang, who was in charge of the congregation in 1688. 
At the troubles he left Newry, and residing in the neigh- 
bourhood of Carnmoney in 1690 he undertook, with the 
consent of the Presbytery, to supply that congregation till he 
should have an opportunity of returning to his proper 
charge. He returned to Newry in May, 1692. In 1698 it is 
reported to the Synod that the meeting-house is now within 
a mile of that town, towards Narrow Water. Mr. Lang died 
on the 25th of January, 1702. His successor was Mr. Robert 
Rainey, who was ordained here on the 25th of June, 1706. 
He died in this charge on the lOtli of September, 1736 ; and 
was succeeded by Mr. James Moody, minister of Magherally, 
who was settled here in 1740. Mr. Moody died in this 
charge on the 26th of May, 1779. He was succeeded by his 
son, Mr. Boyle Moody, who belonged to the Southern As- 
sociation, and was installed here by the Presbytery of 
Armagh on the 11th of August, 1779. He died in this 
charge on the 5th of February, 1799. The next minister 
was Mr. John Thom, who was a native of Scotland, and a 
licentiate of the Presbytery of Aughterarder. He was 
ordained here on the 5th of August, 1800. His ministry 
was short, as he died here on the 18th of July, 1808, leaving 
a widow and family. He was succeeded by Mr. Andrew Gr. 
Malcom, formerly minister of Dunmurry, who was installed 
here on the 14th of March, 1809. In 1820 he received the 
honorary degree of D.D. He died January 12th, 1823, 
leaving a widow and family. The next minister was Mr. 
John Mitchell, formerly of Londonderry, who was installed 
here September 2nd, 1823. He was the father of Mr. John 
Mitchell of political notoriety. Mr. Mitchell at length 
avowed himself a Unitarian, and left the Synod of Ulster in 
1829. He died on the 28th of February, 1840. In con- 
sequence of his theological views there was a considerable 
secession from his congregation ; and another was formed 
in connection with the Synod of Ulster. Mr. James 
Shields was chosen minister, and was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Dromore on the 20th of June, 1829. Mr. 
Shields resigned the charge of the congregation on the 28th 
of July, 1846, and left the ministry. He was succeeded by 
Mr. John Moran, who had for a short time been minister of 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS, 207 

1st Ballibay, and who was installed here on the 16th of 
November, 1846. Mr. Moran resigned this charge on the 
17th of March, 1862, on his removal to Belmont, near Belfast; 
and was succeeded by Mr., William Todd Martin, who was 
ordained here on the 19th of November, 1862. Mr. Martin 
resigned this charge on the 22nd of January, 1867, having 
accepted a call from Strean Church, Newtownards ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. John H. Munro, who was ordained here on 
the 17th of December, 1867. Mr. Mum-o resigned this 
charge in the summer of 1873 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
James C. Ferris, who was installed here on the 18th of 
February, 1874. 

NEWTOWNAEDS 1st. 

This congregation was early planted. The first minister 
appears to have been Mr. David Kennedy. He was deposed 
and fined by the High Commission Court in Dublin ; but the 
sentence was reversed on the 14th of August, 1641. In 1642 
an eldership or session was regularly ordained in this place, 
and Mr. John Maclellan was then the minister. He was not 
long here ; and was succeeded by Mr. John Greg, who beinw 
obliged to make his escape from Carrickfergus, his former 
charge, settled here about 1 650. He was dej)osed by Bishop 
Jeremy Taylor in 1661, but he nevertheless continued 
privately among his people till his death on the 20th of July, 
1670. The next minister was Mr. Thomas Kennedy. He 
was here in 1688, but he must have been settled much 
earlier, for we find him a member of the Down Pi-esbytery in 
November, 1671. A notice contained in the following 
minute of the Presbytery of Antrim suggests that Mr. Alex. 
Hutchinson ofiiciated as minister of Newtownards about the 
time of the Revolution. The following is the minute : — 
November 4th, 1690 — Appears from Newton, in the County 
of Down, Provost Corry (the ancestor of Sir J. P. Corry, 
Bart., M.P.), desiring this meeting to supply Newton four 
Sabbaths in Mr. Alex. Hutchinson's absence, then supplying 
Dublin." The next minister was Mr. John Smith, but the 
date of his ordination cannot now be ascertained. He died 
November 8th, 1704. The next minister was Mr. John 
Mairs, who was loosed from Longford in 1706, and settled 
here the following year. He died on the 25th of December, 
1718. He was succeeded by his son, who was also John 
Mairs, and who was ordained here on the 10th of February, 



208 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

1720. In 1725 he joined the Non- subscribing Presbytery of 
Antrim.* Meanwhile a number of the people appear to have 
become dissatisfied with his ministry, and in consequence, in 
1723, they had become a congregation adhering to the Synod 
of Ulster. They do not seem, however, to have been able 
for a considerable time to maintain a minister. In 1726 
Mr. James Moorhead appears to have been stationed here. 
He was succeeded by Mr. James Smith, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Bangor on the 10th of April, 1739. 
Mr. Smith was removed to Capel Street, Dublin, in February, 
1740 ; and was succeeded by Mr. James Huey, who was 
ordained here by the same Presbytery on the 6th of July, 
1742. On the erection of the Presbytery of Belfast, this 
congregation was annexed to it. Mr. Huey becoming infirm, 
Mr. James Sim son was ordained by the Presbytery of 
Belfast his assistant and successor on the 24th of August, 
1790. Mr. Huey died on the 24th of October, 1794, leaving 
no family. Mr. Simson removed to America in May, 1799 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. James M'Cullough, who was 
ordained here on the 20th of May, 1800. Becoming infirm, 
his son, Mr. Julius M'Cullough, was ordained here as his 
assistant and successor on the 28th of August, 1834. His 
father survived for several years. Mr. Julius M'Cullough 
having obtained leave for the congregation to choose an 
assistant and successor, Mr. Matthew M'Auley was ordained 
here on the 7th of November, 1865. Mr. Julius M'Cullough 
died on the 7th December, 1866. Mr. M'Auley resigned the 
pastoral charge on the 4th of February, 1879, having accepted 
a call from a congregation in the Presbytery of London ; and 
on the 29th of July of the same year Mr. William Wright 
was ordained here. 

NEWTOWNAEDS 2nd. 

This congregation was originally connected with the 
Antiburgher Seceders. Most of the individuals at first 
belonging to it resided about Conlig. The preaching com- 
menced in the open air, as the people had not the accom- 
modation of any large covered building. A temporary 
structure of a very humble description was provided ; and, as 
it was within the bounds of the parish of Bangor, the con- 

* This congregation still exists in connection with the Unitarian 
Body. The first Marquis of Londonderry, father of the celebrated 
Lord Castlereagh, was till his death a member of it. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 209 

gregation was in the beginning so called. Theii* first minister 
was Mr. James Martin. He was ordained at Conlig in 1753. 
In his time a house of worship was built in Newtownards. 
The date of its erection (1771) was on a stone above the 
south door ; and the initials of the minister (J, M.) appeared 
on the tokens used when the Lord's Supper was dispensed. 
Mr. Martin appears to have preached in this meeting-house 
until about 1776, when he is said to have emigrated to 
America. He was succeeded by Mr. Francis Archibald, who 
was ordained here on the 5th of August, 1777. He continued 
in this charge till August, 1780, when he left the counti-y. 
A long vacancy now occurred ; but at length Mr. James 
Bigger was ordained pastor on the 13th of April, 1785. He 
was disannexed from this charge in 1797, the year before the 
rebellion, and he removed to North Britain. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. James Gardner, who was ordained here on the 
4th of November, 1801. Mr. Gardner was married to Mag- 
dalene Frazer, a lineal descendant of the celebrated Ralph 
Ershine, one of the founders of the Scottish Secession. Mr. 
Gardner died in January, 1812. The first four ministers of 
this congregation, viz., Messrs. Martin, Archibald, Bigger, 
and Gardner were all natives of Scotland. Mr. Gardner was 
succeeded by Mr. David Maxwell, who was installed here as 
pastor on the 23rd of September, 1812. He had been pre- 
viously minister of Drumkeen, in County Monaghan. Mr. 
Maxwell died on the 11th October, 1859, and was succeeded 
by Mr. James Young, who was ordained here on the 26th of 
June, 1860. 

NEWTOWNCROMMELIN. 

This congregation was erected by the Presbytery of Bally- 
mena in 1826. The first minister was Mr. Joseph Anderson, 
who was ordained here on the 8th of August of that year. 
The congregation obtained Begium Donum in 1831 in the 
3rd class. In May, 1834, Mr. Anderson resigned the con- 
gregation and emigrated to America. He was succeeded by 
Mr. John Gemmil, a licentiate of the Church of Scotland, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Connor on the 
23rd of June, 1835. On the 18th of April, 1837, Mr. 
Gemmil resigned the charge, and became minister of Fairlie, 
near Largs, in Scotland. He was succeeded by Mr. Malcom 
Orr, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Connor on 
the 28th of November, 1837. Mr. Orr died on the 8th of 



210 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

December, 1876 ; and was succeeded by Mr. William J. 
Gilmore, wbo was ordained here on the 18th of December, 

1877. 

NEWTOWNHAMILTON. 

This congregation was formerly connected with Creggan, 
The last minister of the united congregation was the Rev, 
Daniel Gunn Brown, who was ordained on the 6th of March. 
1833.* After the separation, Mr. Brown remained minister 
of Newtownhamilton. Becoming infirm, he resigned this 
charge on the 1st of November, 1870. He had previously 
obtained as his assistant and successor Mr. John Kirkj^atrick, 
who was ordained here on the 28th of May, 1868. On the 
3rd of November, 1874, Mr, Kirkpatrick resigned this charge, 
having accepted a call from a congregation in the Presbytery 
of New York. On the 14th of December, 1875, Mr. Thomas 
Dysart was ordained to this charge, 

NEWTOWNSTEWAET 1st. 

Livingston in his "Memoirs" mentions, among his 
acquaintances in the ministry in Ireland, Mr. William 
Moorecraft of Newtownstewart, in the Presbytery of Lagan, 
in the year 1654. He was deposed in 1661, and probably 
soon after went to Scotland. For a long time the Presby- 
terians of Newtownstewart belonged to an adjoining con- 
gregation, and they had no place of worship in the town. 
In 1802 they supplicated the Synod of Ulster to be erected 
into a separate charge, and their request was soon afterwards 
granted. The first minister was Mr. John M'Farlan, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Strabane on the 19th 
of December, 1804. In 1824 he was suspended for the 
irregular celebration of marriage and other misconduct. At 
length in 1825 leave was given to the congregation to elect 
another minister, Mr, Charles Adams was ordained to the 
pastoral charge on the 9th of August, 1827, On the 12th of 
May, 1830, Mr. M'Farlan was degraded for again celebrating 
marriage irregularly. On the 17th of August, 1842, Mr. 
Adams was suspended ; and on the 29th of June, 1843, Mr, 
John M'Carter was ordained to the pastoral charge, Mr. 
M'Carter soon became unable to perform his ministerial 

* Mr. Brown is (collaterally) descended from the Eev. James 
Kirkpatrick, the author of " Presbyterian Loyalty." 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 211 

duties ; and, in consequence, Mr. Robert C. Donnel "was 
ordained as his assistant on the 28th of February, 1849. 
Mr. Donnel died very shortly after the Assembly of 1881. 
He was succeeded by Mr. William G. Black, who was 
ordained here on the 15th of March, 1882. 



OMAGH 1st. 

Mr. Samuel Haliday was minister here before the 
Revolution. He seems to have been here as early as 1664. 
He fled to Scotland in 1688, but returned in 1692. At his 
return he settled in Ardstraw, Omagh having declaimed its 
inability to support a minister, in which destitute state it 
continued till they obtained Mr. James Maxwell, who was 
ordained here November 8th, 1699. He died in this charge 
February 1st, 1750, aged 89 years; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Hugh Delap, who was ordained here by the Presbytery 
of Strabane June 5th, 1751. In the same year they apply to 
be annexed to the Presbytery of Letterkenny — as the Presby- 
tery of Strabane had sent supj^lies to some malcontents who 
had resisted the settlement of Mr. Delap. Mr. Delap died 
June 12th, 1787; and was succeeded by Mr. Hugh Delap, 
probably his son, who was ordained here April 15th, 1790. 
On May 21st, 1805, he was degraded for immorality by the 
Presbytery. Their next minister was Mr. Samuel Cuthbert- 
son, who was ordained here June 11th, 1806. Mr. Cuth- 
bertson, being irregular in his conduct, was required to 
demit the charge by a committee of Synod appointed to visit 
the congregation ; but was permitted to retain part of the 
Regitim Bonnm. Mr. John Arnold, formerly minister of 
Clontibret, was installed as his assistant and successor July 
15th, 1835. Mr. Arnold becoming infirm, Mr. James 
Maconaghie was installed here as his assistant on the 7th of 
April, 1875. Mr. Arnold died on the 22nd of July, 1881. 
Mr. Maconaghie, on receiving a call from Fortwilliam, 
Belfast, resigned this charge in the spring of 1886 ; and was 
succeeded here by the Eev. William Colquhoun, formerly of 
Ahoghill. 

OMAGH 2nd. 

This congregation originated in the dissatisfaction which 
existed at the time of the settlement of Mr. Hugh Delap as 



212 HISTORY OF CONGJREGATIONS. 

miBister of the old coDgregation. In 1752, commissioners 
consisting of Mr. William Scott, Mr. James Nixon, and others, 
appeared before the Synod of Ulster, i-epresenting fifty 
families in the place, who prayed to be erected into a separate 
congregation. Their apj^lication was granted, and they were 
annexed to the Presbytery of Strabane. Their first minister 
was Mr. Robert Nelson, who was ordained here in July, 1754. 
He died in this charge on the 8th of April, 1801 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. David Gilkey, who was ordained here on 
the 3rd of February, 1803. Mr. Gilkey, becoming infirm, 
retired from the ministry, and was succeeded by Mr. Josias 
Mitchell, who was ordained here on the 2nd of February, 
1842. Mr. Gilkey died on the 15th of August, 1850. At 
the Assembly of 1879, Mr. Mitchell obtamed leave for his 
congregation to choose an assistant and successor ; and on the 
16th of December of the same year Mr. Thomas M'.Afee 
Hamill was ordained his assistant and successor. Mr. Mitchell 
died on the 22nd of July, 1882. On the 12th of February, 
1884, Mr. Hamill resigned this charge on his removal to 1st 
Lurgan, and was succeeded by Mr. William Johnston, who 
was ordained here on the 30th of September following. 



OEEITOE. 

In 1824 the inhabitants of the parish of Kildress, iu 
County Tyrone, supplicated the Synod of Ulster for permis- 
sion to be erected into a distinct charge. Their case was 
referred to the Presbytery of Tyrone, who sustained their 
claim. Mr. John G. Magowan, the first minister, was 
ordained here on the 26th of April, 1825. In 1831 the 
congregation obtained Regium Donum in the third class — 
that is, ,£50 yearly, late Irish currency. On the 1st of May, 
1855, Mr. Magowan availed himself of permission, granted 
by the Assembly in 1848, for his congregation to choose an 
assistant and successor. On the 7th of May, 1856, Mr. 
William Wray was ordained to the pastoral charge ; and Mr. 
Magowan died on the 19th of September, 1867. 

PETTIGO. 

We find the congregation of Pettigo vacant in 1702. In 
1704 it was proposed to be joined to Golan or Fintona. We 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 213 

hear nothing further of its state till the ordination of Mr. 
Joseph Hemphill by the Strabane Presbytery on the 12th of 
July, 1721. He held the joint charge of Pettigo and 
Clougherny. Mr. Hemphill died here in June, 1747. He 
"was succeeded by Mr. James Ker, -who was ordained to 
Pettigo alone on the 14th of April, 1752. He removed to 
Ahoghill in the following year. The congregation now seems 
to have remained for a considerable time in a languishing 
condition. About this period the Rev. Philip Skelton, one 
of the most remarkable men ever connected with the late 
Pi-otestant Established Church, was rector of Pettigo; and 
the account which he gives represents the state of religion in 
the district as very deplorable. In 1792 Drumquin was 
separated from Derg and joined to Pettigo. In 1827 it was 
separated from Drumquin and formed into a distinct charge. 
Its first minister in this state was Mr. John Moore, who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Strabane on the 7th of 
February, 1828. Mr. Moore resigned this charge on the 
12th of October, 1836, and removed to Glenelly. He was 
succeeded by Mr. William Fleming, who was ordained here 
on the 26th of March, 1837. Mr. Fleming died on the 5th 
of March, 1842 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Archibald 
Hunter, who was ordained here on the 29th of June of the 
same year. Mr. Hunter resigned the charge on the 4th of 
February, 1843 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Simon ISTelson, 
who was ordained on the 27th of March, 1844. Mr. Nelson 
died on the 3rd of May, 1847 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
John Donaldson, who was ordained here on the 29th of 
September, 1847. 

PORTADOWlSr 1st. 

In 1821 the inhabitants of this town and its vicinity 
applied to the Synod of Ulster to be put under the care of 
the Presbytery of Dromore, and to be supplied with preach- 
ing every Lord's day. In the following year they were 
erected into a separate congregation, and their first minister 
was Mr. Alexander Heron, who was ordained here on the 
12th of December, 1822. He resigned this charge in August, 
1826, and removed to Ballyroney. Their next minister was 
Mr. William T. Gr. Dowlin, who was ordained here on the 1st 
of March, 1827. Mr. Dowlin died in this charge on the 7th 
of January, 1838 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Alexander Kerr, 
who was ordained here on the 21st of June, 1838. Mr. 



214 HISTORY or CONGREGATIONS. 

Kerr resigned the charge on becoming a missionary to India ;* 
and was succeeded by Mr. Leonard Dobbin Elliot, who was 
ordained here on the 17th of February, 1841. Becoming 
infirm, Mr. Elliot obtained as his assistant Mr. Robert Vint, 
who was ordained here on the 26th of January, 1875. On 
his removal to a congregation in England, Mr. Vint resigned 
this charge on the 26th of August, 1880 ; and was succeeded 
by Mr. W. J. Macaulay, who was installed here on the 20th 
of January, 1881. Mr. Elliot died on the 2nd of April of 
the same year. 

PORTAFERRY. 

The first minister of this congregation was the Rev. John 
Drysdale. He had been chaplain to Lord Claneboy's regi- 
ment, and had remained in the country during the rebellion 
of 1641, He was soon after chosen minister of this charge, 
where he was ordained by Mr. Blair and the ministers of the 
army in July, 1642. In 1645 he was sent as a commissioner 
from the Presbytery to the General Assembly of Scotland, 
partly to obtain the opinion of that judicatory in some 
doubtful cases of discipline, and partly to procure an addi- 
tional supply of ministers. In 1650 he was apprehended by 
a party of about eighty dragoons, by order of Colonel 
Venables, one of Cromwell's ofiicers. Tradition says that 
this arrest was made during the time of divine service, and 
when he was preaching. Two of the gables of the church 
where it occurred, one of them ivy-mantled, still remain in 
Templecranny graveyard at Portaferry. At this period he 
was a prisoner in Belfast for sixteen days. In 1661 he and 
sixty other Presbyterian ministers, being almost the entire 
number then officiating in the province, were deposed and 
ejected from their benefices by the northern prelates. These 
ministers enjoyed the painful, though honourable, pre- 
eminence of being the first to suffer in the three kingdoms, 
after the Restoration of Charles II., for nonconformity. In 
1663, Mr. Drysdale and six other ministers of Down were 
apprehended, and confined in Carlingford Castle, where they 
were treated with great harshness. They were charged with 
a share in a conspiracy, known as Blood's Plot, though some 

* When the Irish General Assembly was formed in 1840, one of its 
first acts was the designation of two missionaries to the heathen. One 
of these was Mr. Kerr, who died soon afterwards ; the other Mr. (now 
Dr. ) Glasgow, is still living. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 215 

of tlaem had never even heard of the affair until the time of 
their arrest, and though they were all quite innocent of any 
participation in it. After six weeks* confinement on this 
occasion, Mr. Drysdale was obliged to leave the country ; and 
he retired for a time to Scotland. On his return he was not 
permitted to remain unmolested. In 1670 he and eleven 
others of the ministers of Down were summoned by Roger 
Boyle, Bishop of Down, to his court, and threatened with 
excommunication. The threat was only prevented from being 
carried into effect by the interference of Sir Arthur Forbes, 
who had influence with Primate Margetson. Such was the 
return made to the Presbyterian ministers for their firm 
adherence to the cause of royalty in the time of Oliver 
Cromwell. The next minister of Portaferry was the Eev. 
Arthur Strayton. At the Restoration he fled to Scotland, 
and never returned. His successor was the Rev. Samuel 
Shannon, who was ordained here early in 1697. Mr. Shannon 
continued long in this charge. A letter of his, and other 
documents to be found in " Kirkpatrick's Presbyterian 
Loyalty," show the virulence of the Irish Prelatical Church 
at that period. In 1739, Mr. Shannon having become infirm 
and unfit for duty, the congregation obtained leave from the 
Presbytery to choose an assistant and successor to him. He 
died Jime 26th, 1743. Meanwhile, the Rev. James Armstrong 
had been chosen as his assistant. He was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Killyleagh October 31st, 1739. His pastorate 
lasted forty years, his death having taken place October 23rd, 
1779. His memory was long cherished with grateful affec- 
tion. He was maternal grandfather of Dr. Robert Stephenson 
of Belfast, his daughter having been married to Mr. (after- 
wards Dr.) Stephenson, who was at one time minister of 
Greyabbey. The following is the inscription on his tombstone, 
which is to be found near the ivy-mantled gable of the old 
church in Templecranny graveyard : — 

The Body of 

the Rev. James Armstrong, A.M., 

lies here. 

He discharged his duty 

as a Fastor 

with dignity and faithfulness, and 

his life was an example 

of fervent piety 

and of sincere charity. 

He died the 23rd October, 1779, 

in the 70th year of his age. 



216 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS, 

In 1780 the Eev. William Steele Dickson (afterwards D.D,), 
who for nine years had been minister of the adjoining con- 
gregation of Ballyhalbert, now Glastry, was installed in 
Portaferry. Early in his ministry cock-fighting was an 
aristocratic as well as a vulgar amusement; and even the 
established clergy were, in many cases, quite ready to join in 
the sport. Dr. Dickson comj^osed and preached a sermon on 
the subject, in which all the genteel and slang phrases of the 
occupation, which he had collected at different times from a 
servant who was quite an adept in the business, were most 
tellingly introduced. This discourse gave a death-blow to 
the practice among the more respectable classes of society — 
the sermon in manuscript having been extensively circulated 
and read. In June, 1798, Dr. Dickson was arrested on the 
eve of the Irish Rebellion, and for three years was kept a 
State prisoner at Fort George, in Scotland, The congrega- 
tion was proclaimed vacant by the Presbytery of Bangor on 
the 28th of November, 1799 ; and the Eev, William Moreland 
was ordained to the charge on the 16th of June, 1800, Dr, 
Dickson, after his liberation from Fort George, obtained a 
call to the newly-erected congregation of 2nd Keady, which 
in 1815 he was obliged to resign from bodily infirmity. He 
died in Belfast December 27th, 1824. He left behind him 
several publications — viz. : " A Sermon on the Death of the 
Eev, James Armstrong," " A Treatise of Psalmody," " A 
Narrative of his Confinement and Exile," and a volume of 
sermons. In 1822 Mr. Moreland having become infirm, the 
congregation of Portaferry obtained liberty from the Synod 
of Ulster to choose an assistant and successor to him. He 
died October 23rd, 1825. Meanwhile the Eev. John Orr, A.M., 
was ordained by the Presbytery of Bangor on the 2nd of 
October, 1822, Becoming infirm, Mr, Orr obtained as his 
assistant Mr, Thomas E, Clouston, who was ordained here 
on the 5th of October, 1875, Mr, Orr died on the 4th of 
November, 1878. On his designation as a missionary to New 
South Wales, Mr, Clouston resigned this charge ; and was 
succeeded by Mr, John Boyd, who was installed here on the 
21st December, 1880, In 1841 the present handsome and 
unique church, rebuilt by the congregation, at an expense of 
upwards of ^£2,200, was opened for public worship. The 
congregational schoolhouse was erected in 1849 at the cost of 
^£220. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 217 



PORTGLENONE 1st. 



The first notice we have of this congregation is in 1726, 
"when the people made an application to the Synod of Ulster 
to be withdrawn from the Presbytery of Antrim and joined 
to that of Eoute. The application was granted. The people 
of Portglenone appear to have previously attended on the 
ministry of Mr. Shaw of Ahoghill ; but, on his joining the 
Non-subscribing Presbytery of Antrim, they withdrew from 
him. Mr. John Hill was ordained as their minister on the 
19th of December, 1727. He died in this charge on the 29th 
of July, 1759. Their next minister was Mr. Eobert Kirk- 
patrick, who was ordained here on the 19th of August, 1762. 
The next minister was Mr. Alexander Spear, who was ordained 
here on the 23rd of February, 1773. Becoming infirm, Mr. 
Joseph Shaw was ordained as his assistant on the 10th of 
June, 1822. Mr. Shaw resigned this charge on the 23rd of 
December, 1824, and removed to Larne. He was succeeded 
by Mr. William Kennedy M'Kay, who was ordained here on 
the 7th of June, 1826. " Mr. Spear died August 12th, 1835. 
Mr. M'Kay having obtained leave to resign, Mr. John 
Houston was ordained on the 19th of October, 1859, as his 
assistant. Mr. M'Kay died on the 15th of February, 1876. 

PORTRUSH. 

This congregation of the General Assembly was organised 
sometime in the spring of 1841,* and supplied with preaching 
by the Presbytery of Coleraine till the close of 1842. At 
this time a call was presented to the Rev. Jonathan Simpson, 
and on his acceptance of it, he preached his first sermon as 
their minister on Christmas Day, falling this year on Sabbath. 
He was installed on the Tuesday following (27th December, 
1842), as their first pastor. Previously he had been ordained 
on 12th August, 1840, by a commission of the Presbytery of 
Dublin, in the then old church of Mary's Abbey. Having 
laboured a few months in the close of 1839 and the commencing 
months of 1840 in the Home Mission service, he was asked 
and urged by the Mission Board to accept ordination and 
remain at least a year. He visited all the counties of 
Leinster, Munster, and Connaught, and most of their leading 

* The late Dr. John Brown, of Aghadoey, exerted himself much in 
\ the erection of the congregations of Portrush and Portstewart. 



218 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

towns ; and resigned this service in the close of 1841. His 
report to the Mission Board is published in the Minutes 
of the (xeneral Assembly for that year, pages 9, 10, 11. 
Of the thirty-three names appended to his call only three 
or four sui'vive ; and not one of them is now in connection 
with the congregation. They had then no church, and worship- 
ped in the little Methodist chapel for nearly four years. Mr. 
Simpson left for the United States of America in June, 1843, 
and after an absence of about a year, in which he visited 
some part of twenty-two States of the Union and both 
Canadas, over fully 7,000 miles, he returned in the summer 
of 1844, having succeeded in raising about =£1,150 (the 
original church, with enclosure, cost d£l,263) for the erection 
of the first Presbytei'ian church of Portrush. In September 
of that year it was entered entirely free of debt. Very 
able services were conducted at the opening by the E,ev. 
Dr. Walter M'Gilvray, then of Glasgow, and afterwards 
of Aberdeen. The famine in Ireland of 1846-47 made 
openings for the truth in districts before sealed. A deputa- 
tion to the United States was decided on, to raise money to 
take advantage of these openings. Mr. Simpson, being 
successful in a private enterprise, was asked on this deputa- 
tion, along with the Eev. E. M. Dill, M.D., and left for 
America again in November, 1848. Difficulties arising in 
the congregation of Portrush, Mr. Simpson saw there must 
be a manse ; and obtained leave from the Mission Board to 
raise money for it when he finished their deputation work. 
Di". Dill and he raised in about six months =£5,400 sterling, 
which prepared the way years after for another deputation, 
consisting of the Eev. Drs. Edgar, Samuel M. Dill, and 
David Wilson, who succeeded in raising some ^86,000. Mr. 
Simpson remained (after Dr. Dill's return) till the close of 
1849, and raised over d£600 more for Portrush manse. On 
Dr. Edward Dill's report to the General Assembly of 1849, 
the thanks of the Assembly were presented to him and Mr. 
Simpson. Portrush manse was built in 1850, and occupied 
by Mr. Simpson in May, 1851, also entirely free of debt. 
To complete the working machinery of the congregation a 
schoolhouse was necessary ; and, after many difficulties, Mr. 
Simpson received from the late Wilson Kennedy, Esq., d£150 
sterling for that purpose ; and, supplemented by a few 
friends, a schoolhouse, costing nearly =£200, was erected and 
occupied in 1853, entirely free from debt. The marvellous 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 219 

Revival of 1859 came on, and the church was so packed it 
was resolved to enlarge it. In the circumstances of the 
country, the Presbytery declined to allow Mr. Simpson to pro- 
ceed to America to raise the money. In Scotland he obtained 
over dfiSOO ; in Ireland nearly <£500 ; and by a bazaar and 
collections other <£500 were raised. The church was en- 
larged to double its former capacity at an expense of about 
d£l,500, and entered again in 1861 entirely free of debt. 
The church property was held on a terminable lease of ninety 
years, and a small lot was thrown in on the rere by opening a 
new street. By waiting personally at Glenarm Castle on the 
Kight Hon. the Earl of Antrim, Mr. Simpson obtained a 
grant of the additional lot, and a promise of a lease for ever 
on condition of erecting a teacher's house and a larger school- 
room at an expense of at least .£600. Unable to fulfil the 
conditions in the time, the whole property was imperilled, 
when God, in His adorable providence, cut the gordian 
knot, and removed the difl&culty. The second Council of the 
great Presbyterian Alliance was to meet in Philadelphia in 
October, 1880, and the minister of Portrush was appointed 
a delegate. When his name appeared in the paper, William 
Young, Esq., J. P., of Fenaghy, Ballymena, called on him 
(Mr. Simpson) and pressed him to go, offering d£100 sterling 
subscription and other advantages. He was pressed into 
the service, and went again to America in October, 1880 ; 
and after the grand meetings of the Council closed, started 
the fourth tack of begging in the United States. And, 
thank God, and the noble Christian people of that great 
country, he succeeded in getting all that was needed. A 
loan was obtained from the Board of Works, and a teacher's 
house was built during his absence, and now all is complete at 
another additional sum of over d£l,500, free of debt. The 
schoolroom and lecture-hall are admittedly the finest in the 
country, the stained glass window and reading-desk being 
presented by Mr. Young. Now the whole congregational 
property, costing over d£5,500, where there was neither 
church, manse, or school, is all in beautiful order, and all 
free of debt — first-class teachers, first-rate schools, and 
overflowing congregations. Over all we inscribe : " What 
hath God wrought T " Not unto us, O Lord, not unto us, 
hut unto Thy name give glory I" 



220 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

EAMELTON 1st. 

The first minister liere was Mr. Thomas Drummond, -who 
was ordained by the Presbytery of Lagan, in 1654. He was 
deposed by Leslie, bishop of Raphoe, in 1661, and was im- 
prisoned in the castle of Lifford, where he remained for six 
years, or till 1670. Mr. Drummond was in this charge in 
1681, but his subsequent history is not known. The congre- 
gation being without a minister, was afterwards joined to 
Letterkenny, under the ministry of Mr. W. Liston. In 
March, 1693, the people wrote, by advice of the Presbytery, 
to Scotland, for Mr. Seth Drummond, probably son of their 
former minister, and he appeared before the Presbytery, June 
26th, 1696, with certificate of his license by the Presbytery of 
Edinburgh. He was ordained at Ramelton, December 16th, 
1696, the people promising him <£40, with 20 barrels of oats 
for the first year, hoping to do better afterwards, and pro- 
mising to build him a dwelling-house — at this time there were 
six old elders remaining in the congregation. Mr. Drummond 
died in this charge, September 4th, 1740, and was succeeded 
by Mr. Thomas Vance, who was ordained here August 18th, 
1 747. In 1 755 he was removed to the congregation of Usher's 
Quay, Dublin, and was succeeded here by Mr. William Burke, 
who was ordained July 25th, 1759. He died in this charge 
January 9th, 1803, leaving a widow and family. Their next 
minister was his son, Mr. William Burke, who was ordained 
here, June 20th, 1804, having been previously licensed by 
the Presbytery of Dublin. He resigned this charge, October 
16th, 1805, and applying himself to the study of medicine, 
became M.D., and died at Dundrum, near Dublin, on the 4th 
of April, 1842, in the 64th year of his age. He was succeeded 
as minister of Ramelton by Mr. Edward Reid, who was or- 
dained here December 8th, 1806. Mr. Reid was brother of 
the Rev. Dr. Reid, Professor of Ecclesiastical History in the 
University of Glasgow, and author of the History of the 
Presbyterian Church in Ireland. He was also father of Dr. 
James Seaton Reid, Professor of Materia Medica in Queen's 
College, Belfast. Mr. Reid died February 11th, 1838, and 
was succeeded by Mr. James Reid, who was ordained here 
September 13th, 1838. He had been previously connected 
with the Covenanting Church, and was not related to Mr. E. 
Reid. Mr. Reid resigned this charge on the 30th of August, 
1860 ; and was succeeded by Mr. W. C. Robinson, who was 



HISTORY OF CONGKEGATIONS. 221 

ordained here on the 28th of August, 1861, and who resigned 
the charge on the 7th of March, 1862, on his removal to 
Ballykelly, He was succeeded by Mr. Joseph T. Megaw, 
who was ordained here on the 18th of September, 1862. On 
his appointment as a Professor in Magee College, Mr. Megaw 
resigned this charge on the 3rd of October, 1865 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. R. S. Campbell, who was ordained here on 
the 30th of March, 1866. On the 15th of November, 1870, 
Mr. Campbell was set aside for misconduct ; and on the 
21st of February, 1872, the Rev. W. D. Wallace was installed 
as pastor. 

RAMOAN. 

The first minister of this congregation was Mr. Daniel 
M'Neill. He was here in 1646, but was irregular in his 
conduct towards the Presbytery. At the Restoration he 
conformed, and was admitted vicar of Ramoan on the 12th 
of September, 1661, For a considerable time afterwards we 
hear of no minister in this district. At length, in 1700, Mr. 
Thomas Elder was ordained. He died in 1703. The next 
minister here was Mr. John Mairs, who was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Route May 24th, 1704. He died in this 
charge June 25th, 1723. The next minister was Mr. Samuel 
Dunlop, who had been minister at Athlone, and was settled 
here early in 1724. This charge he demitted in 1733, when 
he removed to Connaught. He was succeeded by Mr. Robert 
Brown, who was ordained here by the Pi'esbytery of Route 
June 6th, 1738. He died in this charge May 18th, 1767; 
and was succeeded by Mr. William Lynd, who was ordained 
here June 11th, 1770. Becoming infirm, Mr. John Simms 
was ordained his assistant and successor July 28th, 1805. 
Mr. Lynd died in 1822. Mr. Simms becoming infirm, Mr. 
W. G. Boyd was ordained his assistant and successor on the 
17th of November, 1853. Mr. Simms died on the 7th of 
January, 1866. 

RANDALSTOWN 1st. 

The earliest notice we find of this congregation is in 
February, 1655, when commissioners appeared from Drumaul 
praying the Presbytery, or Meeting of Antrim, to supply them 
with preaching. In October, 1655, Messrs. John Shaw and 
Hugh M' Atchison, commissioners, present a call to the 
Presbytery for Mr. John Couthart ; and in December follow- 



222 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

ing, Messrs. James Duncan and John Parker, commissioners, 
present a bond from eleven in the parish, securing ^650 a-year 
stipend, with a sufficient house, and fourteen acres of glebe, 
" convenient near to the church or preaching-house of the 
parish," which was, however, not yet built. In February, 
1656, they state that they had "settled on the place where 
their preaching-house should be built, to wit, at the iron- 
works ;" and on the 21st of May, 1656, Mr. John Couthart 
was ordained to this charge at Drumaul ; and at this meeting 
" the parishioners of Drumaul were spoken to concerning 
building of their preaching-house, which they undertake to 
fall effectually about shortly, and would have been about it 
ere now, were it not for losing the season of the bark, they 
would not have liberty of wood." Mr. Couthart was here in 
1658, but his subsequent history is unknown. In July, 1671, 
we find Mr. Richard Wilson supplying the place as proba- 
tioner. He was ordained to this charge at Broughshane on 
June 5 th, 1672. The Prelatic party then endeavoured to 
prevent Presbyterian ordinations, and threatened those con- 
cerned in them with heavy penalties, which accounts for the 
ordination taking place in comparative privacy, not at 
Randalstown, but many miles distant. Mr. Gowan, of 
Antrim, preached and presided at the ordination. Mr. 
Wilson died in June, 1685, having an arrear of d£80 due him. 
In October following the people gave a call to his son, Mr. 
John Wilson ; but the arrear due to his mother not being 
paid, and the people dividing with respect to himself in 
March, 1687, he returned the call, with permission of the 
Presbytery, " seeing that there were 200 persons for Mr. 
Wilson and about 120 dissenting, and that of the d880 due 
to Mrs. Wilson there were only .£20 paid, and but £6 given 
to Mr. Wilson for his pains among them for the last two 
years." In November following, however, these differences 
being partly healed, they gave him a new call, and he was 
ordained here May 2nd, 1688, Mr. D. Cunningham, of Connor, 
preaching and presiding. At this time the congregation had 
two separate places of meeting ; but, requiring a new house, 
the parties could not agree on a central position. In 
September following, however, they agreed to have it built 
three-quarters of a mile out of town, and that it should be 
forthwith erected. But disputes continuing among the people 
on this head, in November, 1690, Mr. Wilson wished to 
demit his charge, " because of the division about the meet- 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 223 

ing-bouse and other inconveniences which resulted from that." 
He continued in it, notwithstanding, till his death, which 
happened in the beginning of the year 1694. His successor 
was Mr, William Taylor, who was ordained here May 26th, 
1697. Their payments to him were as irregular and scanty 
as to his predecessor. In 1718 his case became so urgent 
that the Presbytery of Antrim complained to the Synod that 
they had used all their diligence with the congregation to 
induce them to advance something to Mr. Taylor, but 
without success, though the people had no exceptions to 
make against him, but esteemed him much. He died in this 
charge in November, 1727. In 1732 the congregation 
divided respecting a call to Mr. William Henderson. The 
Presbytery of Templepatrick sustained the call, and the 
minority appealed to the Synod. On this occasion the com- 
missioners from the majority were Colonel O'Hara, Clot- 
worthy O'Neill, Esq., Mr. Henry M'Cullough, and Lieutenant 
Dobbin. The Synod sustained the call also, and Mr. 
Henderson was ordained here by the Presbytery of Temple- 
patrick October 12th, 1732. He demitted his charge here in 
1743 ; and was succeeded by Mr. James White, who was 
ordained here by the Presbytery of Ballymena Api*il 28th, 
1747. He died October 30th, 1781, leaving no family. He 
was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Henry, son of Mr. William 
Henry, minister of Comber, County Down. Mr. Thomas 
Henry,* who was ordained here June 19th, 1786, was father of 
the late Eev. P. S. Henry, D.D., President of Queen's College, 
Belfast. Becoming infirm, Mr. Henry resigned the charge 
of the congregation in 1823. In consequence of great dis- 
putes relative to the choice of his successor, the congregation 
was put under the care of a Committee of Synod, who 
ordained as his assistant and successor Mr. Archibald 
Jamieson, on the 11th of April, 1826. Mr. Henry died on 
the 30th of August, 1830 ; and Mr. Jamieson died on the 
18th of March, 1835. After many disputes, the Eev. 
Alexander Crawford, who had been a member of the Associate 
Synod in Scotland and a missionary in India, was installed 
here by a Committee of Synod on the 3rd of January, 1837. 
Mr. Crawford died on the 4th of April, 1856. The Eev. 
James Brown Huston had been installed as his assistant and 
successor in February, 1856. Mr. Huston, on his removal 

* Mr. Henry acted as a medical practitioner j and was commonly 
known as Doctor Henry, 



224 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

to Aghadoey, resigned this charge on the 1st of December, 
1874 ; and was succeeded by Mr. James E. Ferguson, who 
was ordained here on the 23rd of March, 1875. 

EAPHOE 1st. 

This congregation is one of the early Pi'esbyterian settle- 
ments of Ulster. Old Bishop Knox, who was placed in the 
Episcopal See about the time of the Plantation of Ulster, 
encouraged Scotchmen to become tenants on the Episcopal 
lands ; and thus it is that to this very day so many of the 
farmers in the parish are Presbyterians. The meeting-house 
was originally built at Convoy ; and until about the middle 
of the last century, there was no Presbyterian place of worship 
at Raphoe. About that time Raphoe was erected into a se- 
parate congregation, and the old congregation was henceforth 
known by the name of Convoy. The first minister of the 
newly-erected congregation of Raphoe was Mr. James Gordon 
who had formerly been minister of Castleblayney, and who 
was installed here in the month of August, 1751. He died 
in this charge in 1785, and was succeeded by Mr. William 
Ramsay, who was ordained here on the 24th of August, 1786. 
Mr. Ramsay died on the 16th of April, 1827, and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. W. D. Killen (now D.D.), who was ordained 
here on the 1 1th of November, 1829. Shortly afterwards a 
series of misfortunes befel Episcopacy in Raphoe. One of 
the Episcopal clergy became demented, and another fled from 
the place on the evening of the Lord's Day to escape his 
creditors. On the morning of another Sabbath, the over- 
heating of the flues set fire to the cathedral ; and the building 
was so much injured that nearly a year elapsed before it was 
again fit for service. Meanwhile the Episcopalians had the 
use of the Presbyterian meeting-house. About the same 
time the bishopric was suppressed by Act of Parliament ; and 
shortly afterwards the beautiful Episcopal palace, built by 
Bishop Leslie two hundred years before, was burnt to the 
grovmd. In 1841 Mr. Killen resigned the charge of this 
congregation on his appointment as Professor of Ecclesiastical 
History in Belfast ; and he was succeeded by Mr. John 
Thomson, who was ordained here on the 19th of January, 
1843. Shortly after the settlement of Mr. Thomson in this 
charge the second congregation was organised. The old 
place of worship, built fully a century before, had meanwhile 



HISTORY OF CONaREGATIONS. 225 

become somewhat delapidated ; and under the ministry of 
Mr. Thomson a new and handsome Presbyterian Church has 
been erected on the site of the former edifice. Mr. Thomson 
having become infirm, Mr. John A. Bain was ordained his 
assistant on the 12th of August, 1884. 

EATHFEILAND 1st. 

The first minister of whom we have any account here was 
Mr. Alexander Gordon. He was in this charge in 1679, and 
continued in it after the Revolution. In 1708, the Presby- 
tery of Armagh divided the congregation, one part to meet 
at Rathfriland, and the other to be formed into a new con- 
gregation at Ballyroney. Mr. Gordon died, February 11th, 
1709, and was succeeded by Mr. Robert Gordon, who was 
ordained here March 27th, 1711, and died in this charge 
April 10th, 1762. He was succeeded by Mi*. Samuel Barber, 
who was ordained here, May 3rd, 1763. He died in this 
charge, September 5th, 1811, leaving a widow and family. 
The next minister was Mr. John White, ordained here Sep- 
tember 21st, 1813. He died here April 2nd, 1836 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. William Rossborough, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Newry, October 24th, 1837. Mr. 
Rossborough having received a call from the Free Church 
Congregation of East Campbell Street, Glasgow, resigned the 
charge of Rathfriland on the 13th of July, 1858, and was 
succeeded by the Rev. Henry Osborne, formerly minister of 
Granshaw, who was installed here on the 22nd of February, 
1859. In the summer of 1862, Mr. Osborne removed to the 
congregation of Second Holywood. He was succeeded by 
Mr. James Wilson (now LL.D.), who was ordained here on 
the 29th September, 1863. 

RAT 1st. 

This parish was early settled with Presbyterians. In 
1644 the Covenant was administered here to great multi- 
tudes. In 1647 Mr. Hugh Cunningham, who had in 1642 
come over as chaplain to Glencairn's regiment, was settled 
here. He was deposed by the Bishop of Raphoe in 1661 ; 
but we are ignorant of what afterwards happened to him. 
Mr. Robert Campbell was settled minister here in 1671. We 
find him preaching in Burt on the 28th of February, 1678, 

o 



226 HISTOKY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

and baptizing the infant daughter of Mr. Hempton, the 
minister there. Mr. Campbell fled to Scotland during the 
troubles connected with the Revolution, but afterwards 
returned to his charge in June, 1691, where he continued till 
his death, October 5th, 1722. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Patrict Vance, who was ordained here as assistant and 
successor to Mr. Campbell December 23rd, 1719. Mr. Vance 
died in this charge January 2nd, 1741. The next minister 
was Mr. William Laird, who was ordained here May 15th, 
1744. Mr. Laird was son of the Rev. Francis Laird, minister 
of Donoughmore, near Strabane, and lineal ancestor of Sir 
Thomas M'Clure, Bart., Belmont, Belfast. Mr. Laird was 
removed from Ray to Rosemary Street congregation, Belfast, 
in 1747. In 1752 the congregation complained to the Synod 
of Ulster that the Seceders had seized their meeting-house, 
and that they had been at great expense in prosecuting a 
suit for its recovery.* In 1754 Mr. James Turretine was 
removed here from Tobermore, and installed on the 13th of 
June of that year. He died in this charge July 21st, 1764, 
leaving a widow and family. He was succeeded, after 
a long vacancy, by Mr. Francis Turretine — probably his 
son, for whom they had waited — who was ordained here 
January 18th, 1775. In 1778 he removed to Mountnorris ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. Isaac Barr, who was soon after 
ordained here, and who removed to Killala in 1780. The 
congregation now continued vacant for many years. At 
length, on the 19th of November, 1795, Mr. Francis Dill was 
ordained to this charge by the Presbytery of Letterkenny. 
Mr. Dill and his congregation were subsequently annexed to 
the Presbytery of Route ; but in 1825 they were re-annexed 
to the Presbytery of Letterkenny. On October 14th, 1829, 
Mr. Dill resigned this charge, and removed to Clough, Co. 
Down. He was succeeded by Mr. John Brown, jun., who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Letterkenny March 
11th, 1830. Mr. Brown was brother to the celebrated poetess, 
Frances Brown. He died in this charge November 2nd, 
1854 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Robert M'Morris, who was 
ordained here on the 14th of June, 1855. 

* The house, when recovered, was quite too large for the congrega- 
tion. A new church was built upwards of forty years ago. 



HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 227 

EICHHILL. 

This congregation continued united to Yinecash till 1823, 
after the resignation of Mr. Eeid, the minister there. The 
people then applied to the Synod of Ulster to be erected into 
a separate congregation, and their request was granted. 
Their first minister was Mr. James Sinclair, who was ordained 
here on the 23rd of December, 1824. The congregation 
obtained Becjium Domim in the third class, or £,50 late Irish 
currency, about seven years afterwards. On the 3rd of May, 
1836, Mr. Sinclair resigned this congregation, as well as the 
office of the ministry, and engaged in secular pursuits. The 
next minister was Mr. James Patterson, formerly minister of 
Gralla, near Eathfriland, belonging to the Scotch Seceders. 
He was installed here on the 1st of March, 1838. On the 
7th of May, 1847, Mr. Patterson died of fever; and on the 
16th of December of the same year Mr. Andrew M'Aldin 
was ordained to the pastoral charge. 

SAINTFIELD 1st. 

This congregation was originally called Tannaghnive. The 
first minister was Mr. Alexander Hutchinson, who was sus- 
pended by Bishop Jeremy Taylor in 1661. In 1690 he was 
removed to Capel Street, Dublin, where he continued till 
April, 1692, when his relation to that congregation was 
loosed on account of his ill health. At the Synod of 1691 
there were commissioners from Saintfield — viz.. Captain 
Gawin Hamilton, Messrs. Robert Ross, Robert Kyle, John 
Hamilton, and others, supplicating the retui'n of Mr. 
Hutchinson, and the Synod of 1692 granted the application. 
He now continued here till his death in 1711. His successor 
was Mr. Archibald Dixon, who came from Scotland in 1705, 
and was received as a probationer, having been licensed by 
the Presbytery of Hamilton. He was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Down April 19th, 1709, as assistant and 
successor to Mr. Hutchinson. In 1714 two townlands, called 
Munlagh and Tullygarvan, were taken from Comber and 
annexed to this congregation. Mr. Dixon died in this charge 
in March, 1739. He was succeeded by Mr. James Rainey, 
who was ordained by the Presbytery of Bangor March 8th, 
1743. He died in this charge January 20th, 1745 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Richard Walker, who was ordained here 



228 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

July 28tli, 1747. He died in this cTiarge January 20th, 
1774 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Leslie Birch, who 
was ordained May 21st, 1776. He removed to America in 
November, 1798. Their next minister was Mr. Henry 
Simpson, who was ordained here December 10th, 1799. Mr. 
Birch died at his residence near Washington, Pennsylvania, 
on the 12th of April, 1828, aged 74 years. On the 23rd of 
May, 1843, Mr. James Wallace was ordained assistant and 
successor to Mr. Simpson. On the 2nd of September, 1846, 
Mr. Wallace resigned the charge of the congregation to 
become missionary to India; and on the 16th of December 
following the Rev. Eobert M'Ewen was installed as Mr. 
Simpson's assistant. In June, 1853, Mr. M'Ewen was set 
aside and subsequently deposed ; and on the 21st of February, 
1854, the Eev. Samuel Hamilton, formerly minister of Conlig, 
was installed here. Mr. Simpson died on the 22nd October, 
1849. 

SCEIGGAN. 

This congregation was erected off Boveva about 1773. 
The first minister was Mr. John Adams, who was ordained 
by the Presbytery of Derry on the 18th of May, 1774. He 
died in this charge on the 8th of June, 1789. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Robert Steel, who was ordained here on the 
first Tuesday of November, 1790. In 1798 it was reported 
to the Synod that " Mr. Steel had pleaded guilty to a charge 
of treason and rebellion before a court-martial; and his 
name was erased from the list of the Presbytery." He was 
succeeded by Mr. Joseph Osborne, formerly minister of 
Corboy, who was installed here on the 4th of June, 1799. 
He soon afterwards removed to Newtownards. The next 
minister was Mr. Andrew M'Caldin, who was ordained here 
on the 8th of March, 1803. In December, 1804, he removed 
to Stratford-on-Slaney, and he afterwards was settled in 
Coleraine. He was succeeded by Mr. John Mitchell, who 
was ordained here on the 19th of March, 1805. In August, 
1819, he removed to Londonderry. The next minister was 
Mr. Robert Gray, who was ordained here on the 21st of 
December, 1819. He resigned this charge in 1833, and 
removed to Burt. The next minister was Mr. Joseph 
Gibson, who was ordained here on the 17th of June, 1834. 
In 1856 the Presbytery asked leave for the congregation to 
choose an assistant and successor ; and on the 13th of May 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 229 

Mr. William Reid Black was ordained to tlie pastoral charge. 
In May, 1864, Mr. Black was suspended ; and Mr. Samuel 
Thomson was then ordained in his stead. 



SPA, Balltnahinch. 

The place now known as Spa, about two miles from 
Ballynahinch, has long been famous for its medicinal waters, 
Harris, in his book on County Down, written in 1744, thus 
speaks of it : — " Its virtues hitherto found out by experience 
appear to resemble those of other sulphureous waters, 
particularly in its great eflacacy in scorbutic disorders, both by 
bathing in and drinking the waters, of which there happened 
a remarkable instance some years since of a Dissenting 
minister, who came to this well overrun with leprous-like 
eruptions on the skin, which had rendered his joints so rigid 
that he could neither hold his bridle nor feed himself. He 
returned home supple and clean after having drank the water 
and bathed in it a month." Every summer not a few, with 
a view to the improvement of their health, take up their 
abode for weeks together at the Spa ; but for a long time 
invalids complained of its distance from a Presbyterian place 
of worship. Persons in delicate health, though desirous to 
attend regularly on ordinances, could not safely venture on 
a rainy Sabbath, or a sultry summer's day, to walk two Irish 
miles to the nearest sanctuary. The people in the immediate 
neighbourhood were not prepared to attempt the erection of 
a church, as they were not in affluent circumstances. At 
length a Christian gentleman, who was in the habit of visiting 
the Spa, solved the difficulty. The late Robert M'Quiston, 
Esq., of Belfast, offered to give d81,000 for the purpose.* A 
handsome Presbyterian church, built entirely at his own 
expense, and occupying a central position, now excites the 
admiration of every one who visits the locality. A manse 
for the residence of the minister — to which also Mr. 
M'Quiston most generously contributed — has recently been 
completed. The congregation has been recognised by the 
Assembly ; and on the 5th of May, 1874, Mr. William 
Wilson was ordained to the pastoral charge. The church 

* Mr. M'Quiston, who was a member of Linen Hall Street Presby- 
terian Church, Belfast, gave large donations to religious objects ; and 
by his will devoted several thousands of pounds to the erection cf a 
Presbyterian church in the neighbourhood of his own residence. 



230 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 

has proved a great blessing to the people of the neighbour- 
hood ; and its crowded appearance every Sabbath, especially 
during the summer months, attests how much it was required. 
Mr. Wilson, on his removal to Greenock, resigned this 
charge on the 2nd of July, 1879 ; and was succeeded by Mr. 
James Knowles, who was ordained here on the 30th of 
December of the same year. 

STEWARTSTOWN 1st. 

This congregation formed originally a part of Brigh. In 
1788 a petition from 100 persons — twenty-three of whom 
formerly belonged to Brigh — was presented to the Synod of 
Ulster, stating that they were building a meeting-house 
in Stewartstown, and supplicating to be erected into a 
distinct congregation. The concession was not immediately 
made ; but in 1789, when Mr. David Park appeared as com- 
missioner, the request was granted. Their first minister was 
Mr. William Henry, who was ordained here on the 23rd of 
March, 1790. He resigned this charge on the 5th of January, 
1791, and removed to Armagh. He was succeeded by Mr. 
James Adams, who was ordained on the 6th of December, 
1791. Mr. Adams died here on the 26th of December, 1801, 
leaving a widow and family. The next minister was Mr. 
Moses Chambers, who was ordained on the 7th of September, 
1802. Mr. Chambers died on the 20th of August, 1813, 
leaving a widow and family. He was succeeded by Mr. 
Eobert Allen, who was ordained on the 7th of June, 1814. 
Mr. Allen, on his appointment as Superintendent of the 
Connaught Mission, resigned this charge ; and on the 31st 
of July, 1849, Mr. Isaiah N. Harkness was ordained his 
successor. Mr. Allen died on the 1st of April, 1865. Mr. 
Harkness becoming infirm, Mr. J. A. Campbell, a licentiate 
of the Presbytery of Athlone, was ordained as his assistant 
and successor on the 20th of August, 1885. Mr. Harkness 
died on the 23rd of October following. 

ST. JOHNSTONE. 

This congregation originated in the divisive courses of 
Mr. William Cray, who had been minister of Taughboyne, 
and had removed to Usher's Quay, Dublin. Resigning 
Usher's Quay, he returned to the North, and erected a con- 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 231 

gregation in the village of St. Johnstone, near Deny, in an 
irregulai* manner. For this he was deposed. The people 
returned to the Synod of Ulster in 1731 ; and, after profess- 
ing sorrow for their disorderly proceedings, were recognised 
as a congregation, and annexed to the Presbytery of Derry. 
In 1732 Mr. M'Clintock stated to the Synod that there were 
160 families, who could pay =£40 per annum to a minister. 
Their first minister was Mr. Thomas Bond, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Derry August 20th, 1734. Mr. 
Bond died February 22nd, 1785. Mr. William Cunningham 
was ordained JSTovember 11th, 1783, as his assistant and 
successor. When Mr. Cunningham became infirm, Mr. 
Joseph M'Conaghy was ordained as his assistant and suc- 
cessor on the 12th of December, 1834. Mr. Cunningham 
died April 16th, 1836. Mr. M'Conaghy died on the 31st of 
December, 1875 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Francis 
Chambers, who was ordained here on the 7th of December, 
1876. 

STONEBEIDGE. 

This congregation was at first known by the name of 
Clonis. Its first minister was Mr. Patrick Dunlop, who was 
here in 1700. He had previously supplied for a time the 
parish of Kirkowen in Scotland. In 1704 he demitted the 
charge of this congregation on account of bodily indisj)osition. 
He was succeeded by Mr. Alexander Fleming, who was 
ordained here on the 8th of May, 1706. He died in this 
charge on the 13th of October, 1750. The next minister was 
Mr. William Smith, who was ordained here by the Presby- 
tery of Cootehill on the 26th of August, 1752. He died on 
the 7th of May, 1786. He was succeeded by Mr. James 
Whiteside, who was ordained here on the 5th of September, 
1787. Mr. Whiteside died in this charge on the 20th of 
December, 1802, leaving a widow and family. The next 
minister was Mr. Archibald Meharg, who was ordained here 
on the 5th of June, 1804. On the 30th of November, 1819, 
the Presbytery of Monaghan suspended Mr. Meharg for 
various irregularities ; and they subsequently dissolved the 
connection between him and the congregation. He was suc- 
ceeded here by Mr. William White, who was ordained on the 
18th of December, 1820. After a long pastorate, Mr. White 
retired in 1874 from the performance of the active duties of 
the ministry ; and on the 19th of June of that year his son. 



232 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

Mr. W. F. White, who had previously been minister of 
Westport, was installed as assistant and successor to his 
father. On the 25th of October, 1875, Mr. W. F. White 
resigned this charge on his appointment to the Mission 
Station of Lucan ; and on the 2nd of November of the same 
year his father died. On the 11th of April, 1876, Mr. Moses 
Paul Kenny was ordained as minister of Stonebridge. Mr. 
Kenny died on the 2nd of July, 1880 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. R. T. Megaw, who was ordained here on the 7th of 
December, 1880. Mr. Megaw, on his removal to Carrowdore, 
resigned this charge on the 12th of June, 1883 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. James White, who was installed here on 
the 15th of July, 1884. 

STEABANE 1st. 

The first minister of Strabane on record is Mr. Robert 
Wilson, who was ordained here in 1659. He died in the city 
of Derry during the siege in 1689, having fled there for 
safety. His successor was Mr. William Holmes. He was 
born in Ireland, but had emigrated to New England, from 
which he returned in July, 1691, and having produced to the 
Presbytery of Lagan satisfactory testimonials, he was received 
by them, and having gone through second trials, was ordained 
December 21st, 1692. He was married to the daughter of 
Mr. Craighead, minister of Derry. In 1715 he demitted 
this charge, and again returned to New England. Id 1716 
the people applied to the Synod of Ulster for suj^plies, stating 
their reason for this step to be " that the place is of such 
consequence as to require particular regard." The applica- 
tion was granted, the congregation promising to jjay each of 
the supplies ten shillings every Lord's day, and to bear their 
expenses while with them. They soon after obtained Mr. 
Victor Ferguson as their minister. He had been licensed by 
the Presbytery of Derry in 1713, and was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Convoy to this charge April 24th, 1717. The 
same year the Presbytery of Strabane was erected, of which 
consequently this congregation formed a part. Mr. Ferguson 
died in this charge May 15th, 1763, leaving a widow, but no 
family. He bequeathed a house and farm to his successors, 
which they still enjoy. Their next minister was Mr. William 
Crawford, who was ordained here February 6th, 1766. Mr. 
Crawford was great-great-grandson of Mr. Stewart, minister 



HISTORY OF CONGBEGATIONS. 233 

of Donegore, one of the fathers of the Presbyterian Church 
in Ireland. He wrote a " History of Ireland," and several 
other works. Mr. Crawford taught an academy in Strabane, 
one department of which was a species of collegiate institute, 
at which several ministers of the Synod of Ulster, and 
among the rest the late Rev. James Houston, of Ballindreat, 
received all their theological training. In October, 1798, Dr. 
Crawford i*esigned the charge of Strabane, and removed to 
Holywood. He was succeeded by Mr. William Dunlop, 
formerly minister at Badoney, who was installed here 
November 10th, 1798. Becoming infirm, Mr. John Adams, 
formerly minister of Monaghan, was installed here his 
assistant and successor August 31st, 1820. Mr. Dunlop 
died November 24th, 1821, leaving a widow and family. On 
the 30th of June, 1827, Mr. Adams resigned the charge of 
this congregation, and died December 17th, 1827. He was 
succeeded by Mr. William Mulligan, who was ordained here 
March 20th, 1828. Mr. Mulligan resigned the charge of this 
congregation on the 1st of August, 1832, having been ap- 
pointed Professor of Mathematics in the Eoyal Belfast 
Institution. Their next minister was Mr. Alexander Porter 
Goudy, formerly minister of Glastry, who was installed here 
March 20th, 1833. Mr. Mulligan was drowned while bathing 
at Loughbrickland, on the 7th of August, 1834. Dr. Goudy, 
who possessed much influence in the General Assembly, and 
who was Moderator in 1857, died December 14th, 1858. One 
hundred ministers are said to have been present at his 
funeral. He was succeeded by Mr. James Gibson, who was 
ordained Sej^tember 26th, 1859.* Mr. Gibson (now D.D.), on 
his removal to Perth, resigned this charge early in 1873 ; 
and was succeeded by Mr. John MacDermott, formerly of 
Armoy, who was installed here on the 11th of December of 
the same year. Mr. MacDermott, on his removal to Belmont, 
resigned this charge on the 3rd November, 1880 ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. John Irwin, who was ordained here on the 
29th of September, 1881. 

STRANOKLAE 1st. 

The first account we have of this congregation is in con- 
nection with the ordination of Mr. Robert Wilson, who was 

* The present excellent church was erected during the ministry of 
Mr. Gibson. 



234 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 

settled here on the 25th of June, 1709. In 1729 the people 
state that they are not able to pay above d£9 per annum, and 
beg an increase of their allowance from the General Fund. 
The Regium Bonutii, then amounting only to .£1,200 per 
annum, was handed over, in a lump sum, to certain ministers, 
as trustees for the rest ; and some in poor frontier congrega- 
tions obtained a larger share of it than those in more highly 
favoured districts. Mr. Wilson resigned this charge in 1727. 
In that year the Synod thought the congregation ought to be 
dissolved on accoimt of its poverty. Mr. Wilson appears 
afterwards to have resumed the charge of the congregation, 
as he was here in 1735, but we do not know the date of his 
death. The next minister was Mr. Joseph Kinkead, who 
was ordained here September 4th, 1745. In 1755 he removed 
to Killinchy. After a long vacancy, Mr. Joseph Love was 
ordained here on the 16th of June, 1767. He died September 
26th, 1807, leaving a family. He was succeeded by Mr. 
James Nelson, who was ordained here November 2nd, 1808. 
Becoming infirm, Mr. James Steele (afterwards D.D.) was 
ordained as his assistant and successor on the 8th of 
November, 1821. Mr. Nelson died in September, 1826, 
leaving neither widow nor family. Dr. Steele died on the 
17th of June, 1859 ; and on the 28th of December following 
Mr. Hugh Clarke Graham was ordained to the pastoral 
charge. Mr. Graham having fallen into delicate health, Mr. 
William John Macaulay was ordained as his assistant on the 
14th of October, 1874. Mr. Graham, on his subsequent 
appointment as a Professor in Magee College, resigned this 
charge on August 7th, 1878. Mr. Macaulay, on his removal 
to Portadown, resigned this charge on the 15th December, 
1 880 ; and was succeeded by Mr. James Curry, who was 
ordained here on the 11th of May, 1881. 

TANDRAGEE. 

This congregation was erected in 1825. Its first minister 
was Mr. Richard Dill, son of the Rev. Richard Dill, of 
Knowhead, who was ordained here on the 17th of December, 
1829. In May, 1835, Mr. Dill resigned the charge of this 
congregation, and removed to Usher's Quay, Dublin. He 
was succeeded by Mr. James Bell, who was ordained here on 
the 3rd of December, 1835. Becoming infirm, Mr. William 
M'Mordie, formerly an Indian missionary, was installed as 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 235 

his assistant and successoi' on the 27th of September, 1882. 
Mr. M'Mordie, on his removal to Mourne, resigned this 
charge in the spring of 1886. 

TEMPLEPATEICK. 

The first minister here was Mr. Josias Welsh, son of the 
celebrated John Welsh, minister of Ayr, and consequently 
grandson to John Knox, the great Scottish Reformer ; as 
John Welsh was married to Elizabeth, the Reformer's third 
daughter. Mr. Josias Welsh was educated at Geneva ; and 
on his return to his native country, was appointed Professor 
of Humanity in the University of Glasgow. He came over 
to Ireland in 1626, where he was ordained to the ministry by 
his kinsman Knox, Bishop of Raphoe, and settled at Temple- 
patrick. The people of the country called him " The Cock of 
the Conscience," from his extraordinary awakening and 
rousing gift. He died of consumption in 1634. The people 
now remained destitute of a pastor till 1646, when Mr. 
Anthony Kennedy was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Antrim on the 30th of October. Mr. Ferguson, of Antrim, 
preached and presided. There were present the Rev. Messrs. 
Adair, of Cairncastle ; Buttle, of Ballymena ; and Cunning- 
ham, of Broadisland. Mr. Kennedy was imprisoned by the 
Republican party, and deposed by Taylor, Bishop of Down 
and Connor. He nevertheless continued in the country, and 
preached to his people as he had opportunity. In 1688 he 
stated, in a memorial to the Presbytery, that " in considera- 
tion of his age and thereby of his infirmity and weakness of 
body, whereby he is disabled from any part of his ministerial 
work, except it be to preach now and then, as he is helped, 
and that he cannot catechise, visit families or sick when 
necessary, he now gives up the charge of his present flock, 
first to Christ, and then to his Presbytery, for their future 
supply." The Presbytery, however, did not accept his demis- 
sion, and he continued in this charge till his death, which 
took place December 11th, 1697, when he had reached the 
age of 83. In the beginning of 1699 the people called Mr. 
James Kirkpatrick, son of Mr. H. Kirkpatrick, minister of 
Ballymoney, and he was ordained here in August, 1699. 
Mr. Kirkpatrick, who was the author of the well-known book 
called " Presbyterian Loyalty," removed to Belfast in 1706. 
In June, 1707, at the request of Mr. Upton, ancestor of the 



236 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

present Lord Templetown, the congregation was transferred 
from the Presbytery of Belfast to the Presbytery of Antrim. 
Mr. Upton was a zealous Presbyterian, and a staunch advocate 
of Orthodoxy. Mr. Kirkpatrick was succeeded in Temple- 
patrick by Mr. William Livingston, who was ordained here 
March 30th, 1709. He resigned in 1755 from infirmity. 
Mr. Livingston was a zealous minister, a firm Calvinist, and 
a correspondent of the Scottish historian, Wodrow. In 
August, 1755, Mr. Robert White was ordained his assistant 
and successor. Mr. Livingston died September 1st, 1758. 
Mr. White died August 14th, 1772, leaving a widow, who 
was forty-two years on the Widows' Fund. The next 
minister was Mr. John Abernethy, formerly minister of 
Ballywillan, who was installed here August 12th, 1774. He 
resigned the charge January, 1 796 ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Eobert Campbell, who was ordained December 20th, 
1796. On the 4th of May, 1802, Mr. Abernethy was deposed 
from the ministerial office for celebrating marriages irregu- 
lai-ly. Mr. Cami^bell, having seceded from the Synod of 
Ulster, with a part of the congregation, the remainder con- 
tinued under the care of the Synod ; and Mr. John Carson 
was ordained to the pastoral charge May 26th, 1831. Mr. 
Carson died on the 5th of August, 1859 ; and on the 27th of 
December of the same year the Rev. Hugh M'C. Hamilton 
was ordained to the pastoral charge of the congregation. 

TOBERMORE. 

An attempt was made in 1736 to induce the Synod of 
Ulster to erect a congregation here. As it was considered 
that the congregation of Maghera would thereby be seriously 
injured, the application was in the first instance unsuccessful. 
But it was renewed the year following ; and the commis- 
sioners who urged it, and among whom were Messrs. Samuel 
Fulton and Alexander Black, made out such a strong case 
that the Synod agreed to sanction the erection. It was 
urged that some of the people were at least eight miles from 
Maghera. The boundaries of the new congregation were to 
be the Mayola River, from Newforge Bridge to Corrin 
Bridge. In 1743 nineteen families in Ballynahone, formerly 
belonging to Maghera, were annexed to this congregation, 
and the names of the heads of these families were John 
Bell, Thomas Jamieson, William M'Master, Jo. Laverty, 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 237 

Eoger Laverty, William Henderson, Jo. M' Allen, John 
Fulton, Jo. Paul, jun. ; Widow Hunter, James Paul, Robert 
Paul, Samuel Young, James Young, Jo. Ewings, Robert 
Ewings, Andrew Ewings, James Phillips, and Samuel Neilly. 
They at last obtained for their minister Mr. James Turretine, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Tyrone on the 
5th of June, 1744. He demitted this charge in 1748, but 
again consented to become their minister, and was installed 
here by the Presbytery of Tyrone early in the year 1750. 
In 1754, however, he finally removed from this place, and 
settled in Ray. Their nest minister was Mr. James White- 
side, who was ordained here on the 1st of August, 1757. He 
died on the 23rd of March, 1798, leaving a family ; and was 
succeeded by Mr. Alexander Carson, who was ordained here 
on the 11th of December, 1798. In May, 1805, Mr. Carson 
withdrew from the Presbyterian Church, and joined the 
Baptists. Mr. Carson (afterwards D.D.) was a minister of 
great ability, and a distinguished controversial writer ; but, 
notwithstanding, his new views have since made very little 
progress in the country. His withdrawal from the Presby- 
terian Church led to a long and expensive lawsuit relative to 
the property of the meeting-house; but the Synod eventually 
succeeded in securing possession of it. The next minister 
was Mr. William Brown, who was oi-dained here on the 20th 
of November, 1810. Mr. Brown died on the 19th of April, 
1860 ; and he was succeeded by Mr. William Anderson, who 
was ordained here on the 29th of June of the same year. 
On the 1st of July, 1867, Mr. Anderson resigned this 
charge ; and on the 30th of September of the same year Mr. 
James A. Eobson was ordained to the ministry in this con- 
gregation. Mr. Robson died on the 27th of February, 1884; 
and was succeeded by Mr. Marcus Stevenson, who was 
ordained here on the 7th of May, 1884. 

TULLAJVIORE, King's Co. 

Birr, Parsonstown, was for many years the only Presby- 
terian church in King's County. Tullamore is the second. 
The first step to establish the Presbyterian cause in this the 
Assize town of the county was on 5th June, 1856, when Dr. 
James Coulter, an elder from Adelaide Road, Dublin, who 
had come to reside in Tullamore, and Mr. Oliver Dobbin, 
of the Bank of Ireland, appeared before the Athlone Presby- 



238 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

tery at Corboy with a petition from twelve families, repre- 
senting forty-eight individuals in and around Tullamore, 
praying to be organised into a congregation of the General 
Assembly, and offering at least <£20 for the support of a 
minister. The prayer of the memorial was granted, a house 
in the town rented, two rooms made into one and fitted up 
for worship, and soon after supplies were sent them. On 
September 28th, 1856, they gave a unanimous call to Mr, 
Samuel Kelly, a licentiate of Bailieboro' Presbytery ; and on 
3rd December following Mr. Kelly was ordained the first 
minister of the congregation. After labouring here with 
acceptance, Mr. Kelly resigned the charge for an appoint- 
ment to Australia on the Colonial Mission, and was designated 
on 22nd April, 1858, the Kev. W. M'Clure, Deny, giving a 
most impressive charge on the occasion. The next minister 
was Mr. James Duff Cuffey, a licentiate of Comber Presby- 
tery, who was oi'dained here on 30th June, 1859 ; and at the 
meeting of Assembly the following week the congregation 
was transferred from the Presbytery of Athlone to that of 
Dublin. In less than two years Mr. Cuffey's health began 
to decline ; he fell into consumption, and the congregation 
became greatly reduced. He died on 5th May, 1863, leaving 
a widow. The next minister was Mr. Andrew Burrowes, who 
was ordained here by the Presbytery of Dublin on 29th 
June, 1864. The congregation began to revive after his 
settlement. They felt the want of a suitable place of worship, 
and resolved to build a church. In 1865 they secured an 
admirable site at the head of the Main Street. The people 
subscribed liberally for their means, and were aided by 
friends throughout the country and some in Scotland. The 
late William Todd, Esq., Dublin, gave =£60, and Dr. Edgar, 
Belfast, d£250 out of a fund placed at his disposal for such 
purposes. A neat, commodious edifice was erected, and 
opened free of debt the following year, one of Dr. Edgar's 
last public acts being to preach the opening sermon. Mr. 
Burrowes having received a call to Waterford, resigned the 
pastorate of Tullamore on 16th July, 1868. The congrega- 
tion unanimously chose Mr. Eobert H. Smythe, a licentiate 
of Eoute Presbytery, for their minister, who was ordained 
here on 17th December, 1868. During Mr. Burrowes' 
ministry the congregation was steadily increasing, and after 
Mr. Smythe's induction it made still more rapid and healthy 
progress, so much so that the church had to be enlarged. A 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 239 

session room and a room for the Sabbath-scliool to meet in 
■was built, and the church pewed and lighted with gas for 
evening services. Mr. Smythe also opened and sustained 
mission-stations in all the neighbouring towns and villages ; 
and the congregation is represented in the printed report for 
1874 as having raised for all purposes over ^270. Dr. 
James Coulter, elder, died on 6th Febrvxary, 1870. He was 
a staunch friend and supporter of the congregation from the 
beginning, and to him the congregation was indebted for 
wise counsel and generous aid. Mr. Smythe accepted a call 
from Cari'owdore, Ards Presbytery, and resigned the charge 
of Tullamore on 11th June, 1879, to the great regret of all 
the congregation. It has been sneeringly said that a minister 
does not accept a call to another charge unless there is the 
inducement of a larger income, but Mr. Smythe's translation 
to Carrowdore is a striking exception. The congregation 
now called the Rev. David Mitchel, minister at Kilkenny, 
who was installed in Tullamore on 2 1st August, 1879, but he 
did not remain a year in the charge. Having accepted a call 
to Warren j)oint, he resigned Tullamore on 21st June, 1880. 
The congregation then called the Rev. William S. Frackelton, 
who had joined the Irish General Assembly in June from 
the United States of America, Mr. Frackelton was installed 
here on 19th November, 1880. Being appointed by the 
Board of Missions to the colony of New South Wales, Mr. 
Frackleton resigned this charge on the 2nd of September, 
1884 ; and Mr. Henry Patterson Glenn, a licentiate of the 
Presbytery of Dublin, was ordained here on the LOth of 
December following. 

TULLYLISH. 

This congregation was also known by the name of Dona- 
cloney. The earliest notice of it is connected with the 
ordination of Mr. John Cunningham to the pastoral charge 
in the year 1670. He was here in 1688, when he retired to 
Scotland and never returned. The congregation continued 
vacant in 1697, and for some time after. The next minister 
was Mr, Gilbert Kennedy, who was ordained here by the 
Presbytery of Armagh March 23rd, 1704. He died in this 
charge July 8th, 1746. He was succeeded by Mr. Samuel 
Sims, who was installed at Tullylish by the Presbytery of 
Dromore November 4th, 1746. He had been formerly 
minister of Anahilt. He died in this charge October 14th, 



240 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 

1768, leaving a widow and family ; and was succeeded by 
Mr. Samuel Morell, who was ordained here March 6th, 1770. 
He was shot by the Hearts of Oak March 6th, 1772, leaving 
neither widow nor family.* The next minister was Mr. John 
Sherrard, who was ordained here November 4th, 1774. Mr. 
Sherrard becoming infirm, Mr. John Johnston, formerly 
minister of Cootehill, was installed as his assistant and 
successor October 1st, 1811. Mr. Sherrard died June 18th, 
1829, leaving a widow and family. Mr. Johnston (subse- 
quently created D.D.) died on the 16th October, 1862. On 
the 2nd of December of the same year, Mr. James Cargin 
was ordained to the pastoral charge. On his removal to 
Dublin, Mr. Cargin resigned this charge on the 23rd of 
December, 1872 ; and was succeeded by Mr. John Morrison, 
who was ordained here on the 16th September, 1873. 

URNEY AND SION. 

This congregation is of ancient date. In 1654 Mr. James 
Wallace was ordained here. He died in this charge in 
November, 1674. His successor was Mr. David Brown, from 
the Presbytery of Stirling, who was ordained here in 1677. 
He fled to Derry in 1688, and died in the city during the 
siege. He was succeeded by Mr. William Holmes, who had 
been received by the Presbytery as a probationer on the 25th 
of June, 1695, and who was ordained to this charge on the 
22nd of December, 1696. In 1697 he was suspended from 
the ministry on account of some " scandalous carriage " in 
the house of Mr. Rowat. He was appointed to appear before 
the Synod at Coleraine in February following ; but having 
acknowledged his scandal before the Presbytery in January, 
his suspension was removed. He died in this charge in 
October, 1 784. The next minister was Mr. William Macbeath, 
who was ordained here by the Presbytery of Strabane on the 
22nd of December, 1737. He was removed to Usher's Quay, 
Dublin, in 1745. The next minister was Mr. Andrew 
Alexander, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Letterkenuy on the 31st of August, 1749. He died here 
April 30th, 1808, leaving a widow and family ; and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. John Gillespie, who was ordained here on the 

* A monument to the memory of Mr. Morell, erected by his friend. 
Sir Richard Johnston, Bart,, is still to be seen in Tullylish Presby- 
terian church. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 241 

26th of January, 1809. He died liere ou the 28th of July, 
1823, leaving neither widow nor family. The next minister 
was Mr. James Purss, who was ordained here on the 20th of 
May, 1824. He died on the 29th of August, 1836, leaving 
neither widow nor family. He was succeeded by Mr. John 
M'Conaghy, who was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Strabane on the 14th of June, 1837. In 1881 it was reported 
to the Assembly that the Presbytery of Strabane had effected 
the union of the congregations of Urney and Sion ; and on 
the 11th of August of the same year the Presbytery installed 
the Rev. Matthew Neill, formerly a minister of the Reformed 
Presbyterian Church, in the congregation of Urney and Sion 
as colleague and successor to the Rev. John M'Conaghy. 

VINECASH. 

The first minister of this congregation was Mr. Alexander 
Bruce, who was second son of Robert Bruce, Esq., of Kennet, 
in Clackmannan, who was lineally descended from King 
David Bruce. Mr. Bruce was minister of Kirkend, in Peeble- 
shire from L690 to 1695. He had supplied some congre- 
gation in the Presbytery of Down, in 1694, as his name 
appears in the roll of that Presbytery, at the Synod in that 
year. Mr. Bruce was married in 1677 to the daughter of 
Mr. James Cleland, surgeon in Edinburgh, by Isabel Kennedy, 
his wife, who was of the family of the Earl of Cassilis. Mr. 
Bruce's daughter, Rachel, was grandmother of the Rev. Dr. 
John Jamieson, of Edinburgh, author of the celebrated work 
on the Culdees, and various other well-known publications. 
Dr. Jamieson's sister was grandmother of Dr. Barnett, one of 
the munificent contributors to the Presbyterian Orphan 
Society. Mr. Bruce became minister of Vinecash, Co. Armagh, 
about 1697, and died in this charge April 16th, 1704. He 
was succeeded by Mr. William Mackay, who was ordained 
here by the Presbytery of Armagh, September 25th, 1707. 
Mr. Mackay died here November 14th, 1733. The next 
minister was Mr. William Dick, who was ordained February 
12th, 1727, some years prior to the death of Mr. Mackay. 
Mr. Dick died in this charge December 23rd, 1740, and was 
succeeded by Mr. James Todd, who was ordained here July 
22nd, 1747. Becoming very infirm, Mr. Henry M'llree was 
ordained here SOth August, 1791, as his assistant and suc- 
cessor. Mr. Todd died in January, 1795, leaving a widow 

p 



242 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 

and family. Mr. M'llree removed to the congregation of 1st 
Keady, in March, 1797. Their next minister was Mr. Wm. 
Reid, who was ordained to this charge May 24th, 1798. Mr. 
Eeid died January 1st, 1824, leaving a widow. In the same 
year the Synod separated Richhill from this charge, so that 
Vinecash henceforth became a distinct congregation, and 
their first minister in this state was Mr. Thomas Dugal, who 
was ordained here November 29th, 1824. In June, 1837, 
Mr. Dugal resigned his charge and removed to Australia. 
He was succeeded by Mr. William Cromie, who was ordained 
here June 22nd, 1838. Mr. Cromie died on the 9th of March, 
1876. He had previously obtained as his assistant Mr. 
Charles Cowden, who was ordained here on the 5th of October, 
1874. Mr. Cowden, on his removal to Glenarm, resigned 
this charge on the 21st of June, 1881, and was succeeded by 
Mr. J. H. Forsythe, formerly of Culnady, who was installed 
here on the 25th of October of the same year. 

WAERENPOINT. 

Until a late period this congregation was known as 
Narrow-water. About the time of the Revolution it was 
joined to Newry, and in 1697 it was jjut under the care of 
the Presbytery of Tyrone. But when Carlingford, which had 
formerly been joined to Dundalk, became a separate congre- 
gation : and when, in 1707, Mr. Wilson became the minister 
of Carlingford, Narrow- water was then associated with Car- 
lingford, and placed under his joint charge. This arrange- 
ment did not give entire satisfaction. In 1712 the people of 
Narrow- water complained to the Synod that they had not 
the half of Mr. Wilson's labours, as had been originally 
determined. The Synod therefore ruled that, seeing Narrow- 
water pays the half of Mr. Wilson's maintenance, viz., £15 
per annum and victual, it should have the half of his labours 
in summer, and one-third in winter. This congregation 
continued united with Carlingford till the year 1820, when Mr. 
Samuel Ai-nold, minister of the joint charge, was appointed 
by the Synod to labour exclusively here : and Carlingford 
became henceforth a separate congregation. During the 
Arian controversy, Mr. Arnold joined the New Light i?arty, 
and withdrew from the Synod in 1829. The Orthodox party 
adhering to the Synod of Ulster now remained for some time 
without a minister: but at length on the 2nd June, 1833, the 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 243 

Eev. Thomas Logan was ordained here by the Presbytery of 
Dromore. In 1842 Mr. Logan removed from Warrenpoint 
to Dundalt ; and on the 27th of September, 1842, the Eev. 
John Martin was installed as his successor. Mr. Martin re- 
signed this charge on the 28th of January, 1847, and on the 
27th of July of the same year Mr. Isaac Patterson was 
ordained to the charge. On the 15th of November, 1875, 
Mr. Patterson resigned the charge of the congregation, and 
was succeeded by Mr. Andrew Halliday, who was ordained 
here on the 21st of September, 1876. Mr. Halliday, on his 
removal to England, resigned this charge on the 8th of March, 
1880 ; and on the 7th July of the same year the Rev. David 
Mitchell was installed here. 

WATERFORD. 

Presbyterianism has long maintained an existence in 
Waterford. In the beginning of the year 1673 Mr. William 
Liston received a call from the congregation here. Our 
Church was then in very depressed circumstances in this 
country, and ordinations were j^erformed with as little pub- 
licity as possible. On the 25th of Novembei', 1673, Mr. 
Liston was ordained here in company with Mr. Cock, who 
had a call from the people of Clonmel. Mr. Liston did not 
remain long minister of Waterford, as, on account of his 
grievances here, he was disannexed from the charge in October, 
1676. He was succeeded by Mr. Alexander Sinclair, who was 
ordained here in 1687. Mi-. Sinclair resigned this charge in 
1690, and removed to the congregation of Plunket Street, 
Dublin. The congregation was afterwards joined with the 
Southern Association, and remained long in that connexion. 
At length, in 1854, the Munster Presbytery was incorporated 
with the General Assembly ; and the Rev. William M'Cance, 
who was then the minister of Waterford, became a member 
of the Supreme Judicatory of the Presbyterian Church in 
Ireland. Mr. M'Cance was the son of the Rev. John M'Cance, 
minister of 1st Comber, County Down. In October, 1864, 
Mr. M'Cance resigned the pastoral charge, and was succeeded 
by Mr. James Carson, who was installed here on the 29th of 
March, 1866. On the 27th of February, 1868, Mr. Carson 
I'esigned this charge, and was succeeded by Mr. Andrew 
Burrowes, formerly minister of Tullamore, who was installed 
here on the 12th of August, 1868. On the 8th of May, 



244 HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 

1876, Mr. Burrowes resigned this charge, having received a 
call to labour as a missionary within the bounds of the Pres- 
byterian Church of Canada, and was succeeded by Mr. John 
Hall, who was installed here on the 27th of July, 1876. Mr. 
M'Cance died, at an advanced age, in the Summer of 1882. 

WHITEABBET. 

About fifty years ago there was no Presbyterian Church 
between Donegall Street Belfast and Carrickfergus.* A 
sermon might occasionally be preached in a school-house at 
Whitehouse, or in some other place along the Shore Road ; 
but those who waited regularly on Sabbath ordinances were 
obliged to repair either to Belfast, Carnmone\', or Carrick- 
fergus. At length a Presbyterian Church was erected at 
Wbiteabbey ; and on the 12th of November, 1833, the Rev. 
William Campbell was ordained as the first pastor. During 
the ministry of Mr. Campbell the congregation was but 
small, as many of the peoj^le of the district still adhered to 
the places of worship with which they had been previously 
connected. On the 15th of January, 1844, Mr. Campbell 
resigned the pastoral charge, having accepted a call from the 
congregation of Alexandria, in connection with the Free 
Church. He was succeeded by the Rev. John Lyle, who was 
ordained here on the 2nd of September, 1844. During Mr. 
Lyle's ministry the present manse was erected. He demitted 
the pastoral charge on the 14th of March, 1860, and was 
succeeded by the Rev. R. J. Lynd, who was ordained here 
on the 19th of September, 1861. Meanwhile the congregation 
increased much : and a considerable amount was expended on 
the enlargement of the church. Mr. Lynd lesigned the charge 
of Whiteabbey on the 7th of January, 1874 ; and on the 27th 
of July, 1875, the Rev. John Armstrong, formerly minister of 
Academy Street Church, Belfast, was installed as the new 
pastor. After having preached in Whiteabbey only two 
Sabbaths, Mr. Armstrong, though in the bloom of youth, 
became suddenly so unwell that he could not continue his 
ministrations, and died on the 26th of December, 1875. He 
was succeeded by Mr. Wm. Rogers, LL.D., formerly of Castle- 
reagh, who was installed here on the 16th of August, 1876. 

* When King William III. arrived at Carrickfergus, shortly before 
the battle of the Boyne, he proceeded along the Shore Road to Belfast, 
and was met at Whitehouse, near Whiteabbey, by Duke Schomberg. 



THE CONNAUGHT PRESBYTERY. 



HISTORICAL FACTS RELATING TO THE CONGREGATIONS OF 

THE CONNAUGHT PRESBYTERY, FROM THE DATE OF 

THEIR FORMATION TILL APRIL, 1886. 



'As most of the Congregations of the Connanght Presbytery have 
been erected in the present century, it has been tliought right to 
furnish this separate account of them. 



This Presbytery was organised on August 23rd, 1825, by 
the requisition of the Synod of Ulster, which met at Coleraine 
in June, 1825— viz. : " That the ministers and congregations 
of Sligo, Killala, Westport, Turlough, and Ballymoate be 
erected into a Presbytery, and denominated the Connaught 
Presbytery." The ministers and eklers met accordingly at 
Ballymote — Rev. Jacob Scott, Moderator. The other members 
were Eevs. David Rodgers (Clerk), Robert Creighton, James 
Heron, and John Hamilton ; with Messrs. Robert Orr and 
Samuel Henry, Sligo, ruling elders. 

BALLINA. 

Ballina was originally a mission- station in connection 
with Killala congregation. In August, 1835, the Rev. David 
Rodgers, minister of Killala, was appointed by the Board of 
Missions to preach in Ballina on Sabbath evenings. His 
ministrations were blessed in retaining some valuable Presby- 
terians in connection with the Church, who otherwise would 
unavoidably have attached themselves to other denominations. 
During the nine years in which Mr. Rodgers supplied the 
Ballina station great changes took place in the population of 
that town ; and his congi*egation felt the effects of the 
removal of many who had been steady attendants at his 
evening services. Afterwards there was an influx of Presby- 
terian settlers, which rendered the maintenance of a morning 
service desirable. The Rev. Archibald Lowry, afterwards 
minister of 1st Donegal, was accordingly appointed to take 
charge of the station. He preached his first sermon there 
on the 18th of August, 1844, and continued to officiate 



246 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

regularly till his removal to Eoundstone, County Galway, in 
November, 1845. Mr. Lowry's work was twofold — first, to 
minister to the Presbyterians on the Sabbath and undertake 
their partial oversight ; and, secondly, to act as itinerant 
agent in connection with the Irish schools, both of which 
duties he discharged with singular zeal and faithfulness. 
In November, 1845, the Rev. Thomas Armstrong, a licentiate 
of the Monaghan Presbytery, took charge of the Ballina 
Station, the Irish School and Roman Catholic Mission depart- 
ment having been specially assigned to the Rev. Mr. 
Brannigan. Having been erected into a congregation, the 
people presented a call to Mr. Armstrong, who was ordained 
the first minister of Ballina on 6th May, 1846. For some 
years public worship was maintained in a schoolroom ; the 
inconvenience connected with this served to retard the 
progress of the congregation. A very suitable site having 
with difficulty been obtained, a church was built, and was 
formally opened for public worship by the Rev. Henry 
Cooke, D.D., LL.D., in July, 1851. A comfortable manse 
was also erected, and a schoolhouse, and subsequently an 
orphanage, in connection with the mission schools, under the 
superintendence of the Rev. Robert Allen, who for seventeen 
years was a regular member of the congregation, and 
materially assisted in its early struggles. The Rev. Robert 
Allen died on 1st April, 1865. The Rev. Thomas Armstrong, 
having been appointed his successor by the General Assembly, 
resigned the pastoral charge of Ballina on 8th April, 1868. 
Mr. Dvdi was ordained on the 30th of December, 1868 ; and 
on the 31st Januai-y, 1877, he removed to St. George's, 
Liverpool. The Rev. T. R. Cairns, formerly minister of Moy, 
was installed in the pastoral charge on the 24th October, 1877, 
and resigned on the 26th of August, 1879, on his appointment 
to the colonial field of New Zealand. The Rev. John Cairns 
was installed on the 29th of October of the same year. 

BALLINGLEN. 

In the year 1845 the Rev. Mr. Brannigan was appointed by 
the students of the General Assembly's Collegiate Classes in 
Belfast to take the oversight of the Irish Schools, and at the 
same time to act as itinerant missionary over a large tract of 
country. Before the end of 1846 twelve mission stations 
were formed. On the appointment of the Rev. Robert Allen to 



HISTORY OP CONGREGATIONS. 247 

tLe superintendence of the Connaught Schools, Mr. Brannigan 
was directed to confine his labours more immediately to the 
Ballinglen district. From this station a memorial was 
presented to the General Assembly in 1848, signed by more 
than eighty persons, of whom a majority were originally 
Romanists, praying to be taken under the care of the Church. 
A commission having been appointed to inquire and report, 
the prayer of the memorial was granted, and Mr. Brannigan 
at once undertook the collection of the funds necessary for 
the building of the church, which was opened free of debt 
for divine service in 1850, by the Eev. Dr. Cooke, of Belfast. 
For a time the cause was well sustained, but emigration 
having set in, few of the original adherents remain, although 
at the census of 1861 over 150 registered themselves as 
Presbyterians. In November, 1864, both church and manse 
were burned down, but being insured, were rebuilt in 1865. 
Mr. Brannigan died in November, 1874, in the 29th year of 
his ministry and the 58th of his age. Mr. William Fearon 
was ordained January 26th, 1876, and resigned January 30th, 
1879 ; and was succeeded by the Rev. James Wilkin, who 
was ordained on the 10th of April, 1879. 

BALLYMOATE. 

About the year 1760 a number of settlers from Ulster, 
with a few from Scotland, came to this district, with a view 
to the introduction of the linen manufactui-e. They were 
organized into a congregation, and ministered to successively 
by the Rev. Messrs. Nesbit, King, Caldwell, Scott, and 
Fleming. For many years the congregation flourished, but 
owing to emigration and other causes in 1850, when the 
present minister, the Rev. John Dewart, who was ordained 
here on the 9th of October of that year, entered upon the 
charge, it was greatly reduced. Since then a manse and 
offices have been erected, a church rebuilt, and a schoolhouse, 
with teachers' apartments, in 1865. The whole stands on a 
plot of ground, held by lease in perpetuity. In the face of 
many difficulties the congregational attendance is steady. 
The day-school is largely attended by Romanists, while there 
is reason to believe that the Lord's cause is making progress 
in the locality. Mr. Dewart becoming infirm, Mr. Joseph 
Northey, a licentiate of the Derry Presbyteiy, was ordained 
his assistant and successor on the 3rd March, 1886. 



248 HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 



BOYLE. 



This congregation is chiefly composed of Presbyterians 
from the North of Ireland. When the Rev. John Hall (now 
D.D., of New York), came as a missionary to Camlin, he 
preached fortnightly in the Wesleyan Chapel at Boyle. Mr. 
Hall having accepted a call from 1st Armagh, he was succeeded 
by the Rev. James Robinson, who commenced a Sabbath 
evening service in the courthouse, but changing the hour of 
service to mid-day, the use of the courthouse was withdrawn. 
The worshipjiers then rented a place for meeting, and in 1857 
were organized into a congregation. Immediately after, in 
consequence of ill-health, Mr. Robinson left Boyle, when the 
Rev. Robert Alexander Caldwell succeeded to the pastorate in 
1858. Mr. Robinson died on the 27th of June, 1858. A church 
and manse have been built, at a cost of d£955, on a site kindly 
presented by Captain Robertson. The church was opened, 
almost clear of debt, for divine service in May, 1859. In 
October, 1863, Mr. Caldwell left for Australia; and was 
succeeded by the Rev. David M'Kee, who, after remaining 
about eighteen months, accepted a call to Ballywalter. Mr. 
John Watson, who was ordained on the 13th November, 
1866, succeeded to the pastorate. 

CASTLEBAR. 

The congregation of Castlebar thits originated. The Rev. 
Mr. Brown, upon his settlement in Turlough in 1854, com- 
menced to preach in Castlebar, for a time in the courthouse, 
and afterwards in a schoolroom, every Sabbath evening. The 
building of a church was contemplated, but the impossibility 
of procuring a site retarded efforts in this direction for 
several years. When hope was on the brink of expiring, 
help came providentially from an unexpected quarter. Dr. 
Christie proposed, through his agent, Mr. John C. Lawrence, 
to dispose of his property in Charles Street, which was held 
by lease in perpetuity. The purchase was completed by the 
transfer of the lease to three trustees, of whom one was the 
late Rev. John Edgar, D.D., LL.D. Thus the property was 
acquired for the General Assembly in November, 1861. The 
purchase was for d£300, of which Dr. Edgar paid .£200. In 
November, 1863, the church was built, and opened for public 
worship by the apostle of temperance. The church of 



HISTOKT OF CONGEEGATIONS. 249 

Castlebar was made a joint-cliarge with Turlough by the 
General Assembly, and is now known by the name of 
" Turlousfh and Castlebar." 



CLOGHER. 

Application was made to our church in 1848 on behalf 
of a few neglected families in and about Clogher that they 
might be supplied with the means of grace. For three years 
preaching was continued every alternate Sabbath by the 
Eev. Messrs. Killen, Hall, and Dewart, each remaining for 
about twelve months. It was then proposed to be taken up 
by the students in connection with the Genei^al Assembly. 
To this they agreed ; and at the close of the session of 
1850-51 the Rev. John Barnett was appointed their first 
missionary to Clogher. Mr. Barnett remained till June, 
1856, when he removed to Carlow. He was succeeded by the 
Eev. James Megaw, who left for Australia in April, 1858. 
The Rev, Samuel Johnston was appointed as the third 
missionary in June, 1858. The Eev. S. L. Harrison succeeded 
in January, 1873, and removed to Dromore West in March, 
1878. Mr. James S. Smith was ordained as his successor in 
July, 1879. Miss Elizabeth Holmes, a lady of singular piety 
and zeal, to whose munificent encouragement the origin of 
the congregation must be traced, died on the 9th of June, 
1877. Her remains are interred in the place to which her 
labours were so much devoted. 



CREEVELEA. 

In January, 1832, a number of Scotch families came to settle 
at Drumkeeran, County Leitrim, with the intention of opening 
iron and coal mines. The Rev. James Heron, of Sligo, 
visited and occasionally preached to them on week days. A 
temporary place of worship was soon fitted up, and regular 
services conducted by members of the Presbytery. Mr. 
John Ashmore was appointed a constant supply, and after 
a short time was ordained on the 15th December, 1852. The 
church was maliciously burned down on the night of the first 
Sabbath of 1853, but was immediately rebuilt, and all went 
on satisfactorily for about four years, when the ironworks 
were abruptly suspended, and most of the Scotch families 
returned to their native land. At present there is a good 



250 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

church and comfortable manse. In addition to the charge 
of Creevelea, Mr. Ashmore conducts divine service in Manor- 
hamilton, Dromahaire, and Collooney with great usefulness. 

DROMOEE WEST. 

This congregation dates its origin from the year 1846. 
At that time the Rev. Mr. Braunigan commenced his labours 
in Connaught.* He gained an opening in this district for 
preaching. His early services were conducted in a private 
house, and the meetings were well attended both by 
Protestants and Romanists. In 1847 the use of a barn was 
kindly granted to him, where for a year he held a stated 
Sabbath service, with an encouraging congregation. This he 
continued until 1848, when the Rev. Matthew Kerr entered 
uj^on the field as stated missionary, and carried on the work 
which had been commenced with such marked success. In 
July, 1848, the heads of families attending the services 
forwarded a memorial to the General Assembly, praying that 
a church should be erected, and that the congregation might 
be permanently established. Through Mr. Kerr's instru- 
mentality a commodious house was erected and opened for 
public worship in May, 1850. A flourishing day-school was 
conducted in it during the week. The first communion was 
observed in June, 1850. In 1857 a manse was erected, and 
in 1860 a new schoolroom. Through the indefatigable exer- 
tions of Mr. Kerr, all was left free of debt. In June, 1862, 
Mr. Kerr resigned. Mr. S. E. Wilson was ordained to the 
charge on the 5th April, 1864. On his resignation in October, 
1872, the congregation again became vacant. The Rev. 
Thomas Armstrong was installed on the 28th of May, 1873, 
and resigned 10th November, 1875. Mr. D. S. K. Coulter 
was ordained here on the 17th of May, 1876, and resigned 
15th January, 1878. The Rev. S. L. Harrison, who was 
installed here on the 6th of March, 1878, resigned on the 
17th of May, 1883. The Rev. William Stuart was installed 
on the 5th of September, 1883. 

HOLLYMOUNT. 

During the years 1851, '52, and '63 some Scotch and 

* Mr. Brannigan could preach in Irish. He was a convert from 
Romanism. 



HISTORY OP CONGEEGATIONS. 251 

Northumbrian families settled in this neighbourhood. Others 
followed in 1856. In the spring of 1852 the Eev. John 
Hamilton, of Turlough, visited the colonists, and occasionally 
officiated among them. In 1853 Mrs. Lindsay, of Holly- 
mount House, gave the use of a schoolroom in the village for 
divine service, and here they continued to worship till 1856, 
being supplied at first by the Presbytery, until, in August, 
1853, Mr. James Love was ordained the first minister of the 
congregation. In the spring of 1862 he removed to Queens- 
land ; and in the month of June following, Mr. Samuel 
Wilson was ordained to the pastorate. In consequence of ill- 
health he removed to Australia in January, 1863. In the same 
month the Rev. Andrew Brown, of Turlough, received a call 
from the congregation, and was installed on the 17th of 
February, 1863. A church and manse were erected at a cost 
of .£1200. The church was opened for public worship in 1856, 
with a debt still remaining of d£350, which has since been 
entirely removed by the noble and persevering efforts of the 
congregation. 

KILLALA. 

KiLLALA (Mullafary) was originally known by the name 
of Moywater, as the church then stood near the river Moy, 
about three miles from its present position. For a time it 
was connected with Sligo, under the ministry of the Rev. 
Samuel Henry, and became a separate charge about 1698. 
Its first settled minister was the Rev. James Pringle, who 
having demitted the pastorate of Ballindreat, in July, 1699, 
entered upon his labours in the beginning of June, 1700. 
Mr. Pringle died January 1st, 1707; and was succeeded by 
the Rev. James Wallace on the 25th of August, 1709. In 
June, 1720, he removed to Moville, County Donegal. A long 
vacancy followed. In 1733 Mr. William Wilson was ordained 
to this charge by the Presbytery of Letterkenny. In 1746 
Sir Arthur Gore wrote a sympathetic letter to the Synod in 
reference to his melancholy situation. He died January 12th, 
1781 ; and was succeeded by the Rev. Isaac Barr, formerly 
minister of Ray, County Donegal. About 1792 Mr. Barr 
resigned the charge; and in December, 1795, the Rev. 
Alexander Marshall, formei'ly minister of Turlough, was 
installed. Mr. Marshall died on February 28th, 1819 ; and 
Mr. David Rodgers was ordained on the 11th September, 
1820. Mr. Rodgers becoming infirm, Mr. Hamilton Magee 



252 HISTORY OF CONGEEGATIONS. 

was chosen as his assistant, and ordained on the 8th of 
August, 1849. On the removal of Mr. Magee to the superin- 
tendence of the Eoman Catholic Mission in Dublin, Mr. John 
Wilson was ordained here on the 14th of March, 1854. Mr. 
Eodgers died in June, 1859. Mr. Wilson, having been ap- 
pointed missionary to Queensland, was succeeded by Mr John 
Wilson, who was ordained on the 31st December, 1862. Mr. 
Wilson having removed to Lecumpher, Px'esbytery of Tyrone, 
the Rev. George Clarke Love was installed as his successor 
on the 1st of April, 1885. Mr. Love demitted this charge 
on his removal to Killeter ; and on the 3rd of February, 
1886, Mr. Thomas Edwards, a Licentiate of Derry Presbytery, 
was ordained here. 

NEWPORT. 

The first Presbyterian family settled in Newport in 1851. 
Others followed, and in a short time a small Scotch colony 
was formed into a congregation. They were first ministered 
to by the Rev. David Adair, of Westport, assisted during the 
summer of 1853 by Mr. Grant, a theological student of the 
Free Church of Scotland, who left in October of the same year. 
The Rev. George S. Keegan has been in charge of the station 
since October, 1853. He was ordained by the Connaught Pres- 
bytery in March, 1854 ; and in August, 1857, the people were 
organised into a congregation. For four years worship was 
held in the courthouse, kindly granted by Sir Richard A. 
O'Donnel. At last efforts were made; a church was built ; , 
and on the 3rd of June, 1857, it was opened by the late Rev. 
John Macnaughtan, of Belfast ; and in April, 1864, was 
pronounced free of debt. For several years past many of the 
congregation have emigrated, and the numbers are thus 
greatly reduced ; but those who remain have made praise- 
worthy efforts to sustain the Lord's cause. A beautiful 
manse has been lately erected, which, by the help of a 
generous public, is now nearly free of debt. 

SLIGO. 

The Rev. Samuel Henry was the first minister of this 
congregation of whom there is any record. He was ordained 
to the joint-charge of Sligo and Moy water (Killala) by the 
Presbytery of Convoy in May, 1695.* In July, 1698, Moy- 

* The ordination is said to have taken place at Monreagh, between 
St. Johnston and Derry. 



HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 253 

Tvater was separated from Sligo, which latter was still under 
Mr. Henry's care. In 1727 Mr. Henry resigned the pastorate 
of Sligo and settled at Abbeyfoile. He was succeeded by 
Mr. Luke Ash, son of Captain Ash,* one of the defenders of 
the city of Derry during its eventful siege in 1689. Mr. 
Ash was ordained to the pastoral charge of Sligo by the 
Presbytery of Letterkenny on the 9th of August, 1732. He 
died in Sligo in 1742; and was succeeded by Mr. Hugh 
Nesbit, who was ordained on the 5th of May, 1756. Bally- 
mote congregation was joined to Sligo about 1760. Mr. 
Nesbit died in 1778 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Joseph 
King, who was ordained by the Presbytery of Clogher on 
the 4th of August, 1 784. Mr. King demitted the j^astorate 
of Sligo in 1797 ; and was succeeded by Mr. Booth Caldwell, 
who was ordained about the close of the same year. Mr. 
Caldwell was a man of prayer and devoted piety. He 
laboured successfully in Sligo till his death, which took place 
on the 24th October, 1810. The next minister was Mr. Jacob 
Scott, who was oi'dained on March 19th, 1811, to the joint- 
charge of Sligo and Ballymoate. In 1823 Mr. Scott was 
appointed by the Synod of Ulster to labour exclusively in Bally- 
moate. Sligo henceforth became a separate charge. Mr. 
James Heron was ordained to the pastorate of Sligo on the 
18th March, 1824. The officiating ministers on the occasion 
the Rev. Messx*s. Bleckley, of Monaghan ; Cunningham, of 
Minterburn ; and Kennedy, of Corboy. Mr. Heron becoming 
infirm, Mr. MofEatt Jackson, A.M., was ordained as his 
assistant and successor on the 11th of April, 1855. Mr. 
Heron died on the 28th of July, 1860. 

TURLOUGH. 

About the middle of the eighteenth century, Colonel 
Robert Fitzgerald, the pi*oprietor of an estate here, signified 
his intention of letting his lands to northern tenants, where- 
upon several families, principally from the Counties of Down 
and Donegal, settled upon his property. These families 
found that, though settled in one of the most beautiful parts 
of Connaught, they had a great disadvantage in being 
deprived of the ordinary means of grace. A deputation 

* Captain Ash was married to the daughter of Mr. Eaiiiey, a rich 
Presbyterian of Magherafelt, who established an endowed school there, 
still in existence. 



254 HISTORY OF CONGREGATIONS. 

accordingly waited on Colonel Fitzgerald to ask his counsel 
and encouragement in the matter of obtaining for them a 
minister of their own persuasion. As the colonists consisted 
of Presbyterians and Episcopalians, each party wished a 
minister of their own denomination. The colonel said, as 
one minister would be suf&cient for both, he would put it to 
the vote, and give his vote with the majority. On the vote 
being taken, it was found that the Presbyterians had the 
majority. A call was made out in favour of the Rev. Henry 
Henry. Mr. Henry, who removed to Connor, was succeeded 
by the Rev. Mr. Marshall, who resigned the charge in 1795. 
In the same year the Rev. Mr. Hall was called to be the 
minister, who continued until his death in 1824. The Rev. 
John Hamilton followed, continuing until his death in May, 
1854. Mr. Andrew Brown was ordained in September, 1854. 
Mr. Brown resigned this charge in January, 1863. Mr. John 
Cairns was ordained in Turlongh the same year. The Rev. 
John Cairns demitted the charge in September, 1879 ; and 
was succeeded by the Rev. James Steen in May, 1880. 

WESTPORT. 

In the year 1776 a considerable number of Presbyterians, 
encouraged by the Earl of Altamont, settled in the town and 
vicinity of Westport. In the absence of any Presbyterian 
service, some of these and their descendants became united 
with other denominations. The Rev. James Hall, of Tur- 
lough, occasionally visited, preached, baptised, and ad- 
ministered the Lord's Suj^per among them. This state of 
things being represented to the Presbyterian Committee of 
Dublin, the Rev. James Horner and Rev. John Birch were 
deputed in 1821 to make inquiry and report. On their 
return the Rev. Henry Cooke (afterwards of Killyleagh) was 
sent to officiate for a few Sabbaths. A room in the market- 
house was granted for public worship by George Clendinning, 
Esq. He was succeeded by the Revs. Messrs. Bleckley, 
Monaghan ; Johnston, Tullylish ; Gardiner, Clare ; Crozier, 
licentiate ; and Henry Dobbin, Lurgan. A memorial was 
presented by the Rev. James Horner to the Synod of Ulster, 
the result of which was the formation of the Presbyterians of 
Westport into a congi-egation, under the care of the Presby- 
tery of Dublin. The congregation was supplied with ordin- 
ances by the Rev. Messrs. H. Kidd, James Steele, Thomas 



HISTORY OF CONGKEGATIONS. 255 

Dougald, and Joseph Bellis ; and, after an interval of some 
months, Mr. Eobert Creighton, of the Presbytery of Tyrone, 
was ordained first pastor of the congregation by the Revs. J. 
Horner, James Morgan, of Carlow ; and J. Hall, on the 23rd 
of December, 1823. The service was performed in the 
market-house, and was largely attended, the Marquis and 
Marchioness of Sligo being present. In 1830 the Marquis 
granted a site for a church and manse, the erection of which 
was soon after commenced. A lease of lives, renewable for 
ever, has been recently converted by the present Marquis 
into a fee-farm grant. Mr. Creighton died in 1834 ; and on 
the 4th of June, 1837, Mr. James Smith was ordained to the 
charge. In October, 1845, Mr. Smith accepted a call to 
Edgerton, Scotland. He was succeeded by Mr. David Adair, 
who was ordained on the 8th of May, 1846, and died of 
small-pox in 1854. On the 20th of June, 1855, Mr. Richard 
Smyth (afterwards D.D.) was ordained to the pastorate. 
Ml-. Smyth accepted a call to 1st Londonderry in 1857. The 
same year Mr. John James Black was ordained on the 8th of 
September, and resigned the charge on the 3rd of May, 1859, 
having received a call to Ormond Quay Church, Dublin. The 
Rev. William White was installed to the pastorate on the 2nd 
of August, 1859. Mr. White having demitted the charge in 
June, 1874, Mr. Joseph M'Kinstry was ordained here on the 
6th of January, 1875. He resigned in April, 1881 ; and Mr. 
Samuel G. Crawford, the present minister, was ordained on 
the 5th of October followincc. 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 



THE FATHEES OF THE lEISH PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH. 

Irish Presbyterians have reason to speak with the highest 
satisfaction of the men who laid the foundations of their 
church in Ulster. They were, in every sense, the excellent of 
the earth. Most of them had demonstrated their earnestness 
and self-denial by resigning situations in their native Scotland 
rather than violate their consciences ; and they were distin- 
guished by their high social position, as well as by their 
superior scholarship. Edward Brice, the first Presbyterian 
minister who removed from North Britain to take charge of 
a parish in the County of Antrim, was the brother of a 
Scottish laird, and had previously been a professor in the 
University of Edinburgh. Robert Blair, who became minister 
of Bangor, was a gentleman by birth, and a man of erudition. 
Josias Welsh, who settled at Templepatrick, was the great 
grandson of Lord Ochiltree, and had been a jjrof essor in the 
University of Glasgow. James Hamilton, the minister of 
Ballywalter, was an excellent scholar, and the nephew of 
Lord Clandeboye. Patrick Adair, who wrote the Narrative of 
the Irish Presbyterian Church, which has recently awakened 
so much interest, belonged to the influential family of the 
same name, one of whom is at present the proprietor of the 
estate of Ballymena. John Livingston, the minister of 
Killinchy, was a scion of the noble family of Livingston, so 
well known in the Scottish peerage ; and was noted for his 
attainments in Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, French, Dutch, 
and other languages. The Episcopal writers who describe 
the early Presbyterian ministers of Ireland as a race of low 
fanatics evidently know nothing whatever of the matter. As 
a body they were in every respect immensely superior to the 
Episcopal clergy by whom they were surrounded ; for these, 
by competent contemporary authorities, have been described 
generally as men of low birth, of no education, and of very 
little principle. Even Strafford speaks of them in the most 
contemptuous language. 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 257 

WALTER TEA VERS, A PRESBYTERIAN", 

THE FIRST REGULAR PROVOST OP TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN. 

It is a fact which should be generally known that Presby- 
terians were originally admitted to all the honours and 
emoluments of Dublin College. Walter Travers, the first 
regular Provost of the Irish University, was a Presbyterian 
minister. It cannot be said that his ecclesiastical peculiarities 
were unknown when he obtained this high litei'ary appoint- 
ment, for he had long before been distinguished as one of the 
most able and zealous of the English Non-conformists. He 
was so much opposed to any recoguition of prelatical autho- 
rity, that he passed over into Holland to obtain Presbyterian 
ordination. He was subsequently appointed lecturer at the 
Temple, a situation which he occupied for several years. At 
this time he came into collision with the celebrated author 
of the " Ecclesiastical Polity," commonly called by Episcopa- 
lians, " the judicious Hooker." Hooker, as Master of the 
Temple, preached in the forenoon — Travers, as lecturer, 
officiated in the afternoon. Fuller, himself an Episcopalian, 
thus speaks of their respective services : " Mr. Hooker's 
voice was low, stature little, gestui-e none at all — standing- 
still in the pulpit, as if the posture of his body was the em- 
blem of his mind, unmoveable in his opinions. Where his 
eye was left fixed at the beginning, it was found fixed at the 
end of his sermon. His sermons followed the inclination of 
his studies, and were, for the most part, on controversies and 
deep points of school divinity." Mr. Travers' uttei'ance was 
graceful, gesture plausible, matter profitable, method plain, 
and his style carried in it 'a genius of gi'ace' flowing from 
his sanctified heart. Some say that the congregation in the 
Temple ebbed in the forenoon, and flowed in the afternoon, 
and that the auditory of Mr. Travers was far the more 
numerous — the first cause of emulation betwixt them. But 
such as knew Mr. Hooker," adds Fuller in his own sly 
fashion, " knew him to be too wise to take exception at such 
trifles, the rather because the most judicious is always the 
least part iu all auditories." These two preachers could not 
long act together harmoniously. Hooker was an abettor of 
Arminianism as well as a strenuous advocate of Prelacy, 
whilst Travers was a staunch Calvinist, and a most decided 
Presbyterian. It therefore frequently happened that the 
doctrine propounded from the pulpit in the morning was 



258 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES, 

overturned in the afternoon, and as tlie two divines ranked 
among tlie most accomplished representatives of Conformity 
and Puritanism, the most eminent characters of the day took 
a deep interest in their controversies. Not only young law 
students, but such men as Sir Edward Coke, were to be seen 
earnestly listening to the sei'mons, and noting down the 
various arguments. As Travers was by far the more effective 
jH'eacher, the high church party speedily took the alarm ; for 
they considered that, were he to succeed in gaining over all 
the gentlemen of the legal j^rof ession to the cause of Presby- 
terianism, the stability of the existing hierarchy would be 
seriously endangered. The Archbishop of Canterbury ac- 
cordingly interfered, and silenced the eloquent lecturer. As 
he was just entering the pulpit, ou a particular occasion, to 
deliver the afternoon sermon, a low official appeared and 
served him with a notice to desist from preaching. He was 
in consequence obliged to announce abruptly that he had 
received such an order, and to dismiss the congregation. 
When Travers was thus under suspension by the Archbishoj) 
of Canterbury, his old friend, Adam Loftus, then Archbishop 
of Dublin, invited him to become Provost of the newly-erected 
Irish University. In accepting this appointment he was not 
obliged to conform to the Episcopal discipline, for the statutes 
of the University Avere originally so framed that its highest 
offices were open to evangelical Presbyterians. Travers pre- 
sided over the College for a number of years, but the civil 
wars at length obliged him to leave the country. He died at 
an advanced age in England in rather limited circumstances. 
We think it right to add that Archbishop Ussher, the most 
illustrious scholar ever produced by Trinity College, Dublin, 
was educated under the care of a Presbyterian Provost. At 
an early period the Irish University was in fact regarded as 
a kind of asylum for learned Puritans ; but, about forty years 
after its erection, high church influence succeeded in changing 
its constitution and in shutting out all, save Episco^^alians, 
from its Provostship and Fellowships. 

THE EEV. SAMUEL HANNA, D.D. 

This eminent minister of the Irish Presbyterian Church 
was born at Kellswater, Ballymena, in the year 1771. He 
was educated at the University of Glasgow, where he obtained 
the degree of A.M. in 1789 j and iii 1790 he was licensed as 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 259 

a preacher in connexion with the Synod of Ulster by the 
Presbytery of Ballymena. From his first appearance in the 
pulpit his ministrations were most acceptable. His voice 
was peculiarly sweet, and, at the same time so full and 
distinct that, without almost any effort, it could be heard 
throughout the largest building. The tone of his preaching 
was remarkably evangelical, and his prayers, into which he 
largely and most felicitously introduced the language of 
Scripture, breathed a spirit of unaffected piety. In 1794, he 
received a call from the congregation of Drumbo, near Belfast ; 
but in consequence of some difficulties thrown in the way of 
his settlement, he was not ordained until the month of 
August of the following year. His reputation as a preacher 
continued steadily to advance ; and on a vacancy occurring in 
the congregation of Rosemary Street, Belfast, in consequence 
of the resignation of the Rev. Sinclai'e Kelburn, he received 
a call from the people, and was installed in that church in 
the month of December, 1799. Dr. Hanna's settlement in 
Belfast was an event of great importance to the Presbyterian 
Church in Ulster. When he became pastor of Rosemary 
Street, the congregation was in a rather dilapidated condition ; 
but under his popular and effective ministrations, it gradually 
revived. In all the religious movements which marked the 
early part of the present century. Dr. Hauna took a deep 
interest. He was a warm supporter of the Sunday School 
Society ; and, so great was his zeal for the circulation of the 
Word of God, that he permitted a portion of his own dwelling- 
house to be occupied, for a considerable time, as a depository 
for Bibles and Testaments. In 1809 he reported to the 
Synod of Ulster, on the part of a committee with which he 
was connected, that he had received in the course of about 
twelve months, upwards of eleven hundred pounds for copies 
of the Scriptures, sold at a cheap rate, to the Presbyterian 
poor of the North of Ireland. When Missions began to 
attract public attention, they found an earnest advocate in 
Dr. Hanna, and it is a fact worthy to be recorded, that so 
early as 1811, he recommended the Synod of Ulster to support 
a mission to the Jews. In the following year, when the pious 
and eloquent Dr. Waugh, of London, appeared befox-e the 
Synod, as a deputy from the London Missionary Society, Dr. 
Hanna espoused his cause, and ever afterwards proved a firm 
friend to that noble institution. At the annual meeting of 
the Synod in 1817, he was unanimously elected Professor of 



260 BIOGEAPHICAL NOTICES. 

Divinity and Claurcli History. Many of the members 
of the Irish General Assembly, were trained for the ministry 
under his tuition. He lived to see a blessed change in the 
condition of Irish Presbyterianism. When he entered the 
ministry, Unitarianism occupied the high j^laces of the Synod 
of Ulster, education was at a very low ebb, vital religion was 
almost extinguished, a missionary spirit was unknown, and 
infidelity was powerful and truculent. He left the church 
furnished with a staff of theological professors, firmly adher- 
ing to the Westminster Standards, united in one great body, 
with more than double the number of ministers and congi-e- 
gations, and supporting four or five great missionary schemes. 
When the Union was effected between the Synod of Ulster 
and the Secession Synod, he was unanimoixsly chosen the first 
Moderator of the Genei*al Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church in Ireland. He died in April, 1852, in the 82ud 
year of his age ; and the immense concourse of mourners who 
followed his remains to the grave, evinced the deep respect 
with which he was regarded by the people among whom he 
had so loner ministered. 



JAMES SEATON REID, D.D. 

The Rev. Dr. Reid, Professor of Ecclesiastical History 
in the University of Glasgow, and author of the " History of 
the Presbyterian Church in Ireland," died on Wednesday, 
the 26th of March, 1851, at Belmont, the seat of Lord 
Mackenzie, near Edinburgh, after an illness of about two 
months' duration. Dr. Reid was a native of Lurgan, and 
was born on the 19th of December, 1798, so that at the time 
of his death he was in the 53rd year of his age. He was the 
21st child of his parents, Forrest and Mary Reid, and having 
been at an early period intended for the Presbyterian 
ministry, in connection with the Synod of Ulster, he went 
through the usual course of ])reparatory study in the 
University of Glasgow, and took the degree of A.M. in April, 
1816. Having completed his theological education and 
obtained license, he received a call from the congregation of 
Donegore, where he was ordained on the 20th of July, 1819. 
Four years afterwards he received a unanimous call from the 
Presbyterian Church of Carrickfergus, where he was installed 
on the 19th of August, 1823. In the year 1827 he was 
unanimously chosen Moderator of the General Synod of 




.wAMiiig. -BiiMsm^ m^muz: 



MM.XA. 






BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 261 

Ulster at its meeting in Strabane. The Arian controversy 
was then approacliing its climax, and, in tlie responsible 
situation which he occupied, he displayed singular tact and 
judgment. In 1830 he was unanimously appointed Clei'k of 
the Synod. In January, 1833, the University of Glasgow 
conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Divinity ; and, about three years afterwards, he was elected 
a member of the Royal Irish Academy. In 1834 Dr. Reid 
gave to the public the first volume of his celebrated work, 
the " History of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland." The 
effect of this publication was most salutaiy. It was read 
with intense interest by the Irish Presbyterians, and it placed 
their Church before the empire in a position which it had 
never hitherto occupied. At the annual meeting of the 
Synod, in Derry, in June, 1834, the thanks of the body were 
voted to the author for his work, and measures were sub- 
sequently taken for extending its circulation. In the year 
following, the congregation of Carrickfergus pi-esented to him 
a magnificent service of plate, valued at considerably more 
than d£100. Dr. Reid's second volume was issued in 
June, 1837 ; and in the following month, at the meeting of 
the General Synod, he was appointed Professor of Ecclesias- 
tical History, Church Government, and Pastoral Theology. 
This new chair having been soon afterwards permanently 
endowed by the Government, he resigned the charge of the 
congregation of Carrickfergus on the 6th of November, 1838, 
and subsequently fixed his residence at Belfast. On the 2nd 
of April, 1841, he was nominated by the Crown successor to 
Dr. Macturk as Professor of Ecclesiastical and Civil History 
in the University of Glasgow. On his removal to Glasgow, 
Dr. Reid still continued to manifest a deep interest in the 
prosperity of his native Church. During the agitation 
relative to Irish Presbyterian marriages he published a series 
of letters, displaying alike his powers of acute discrimination 
and his intimate acquaintance with the historical bearings of 
the controversy. In the midst of all his engagements in 
Glasgow, he found time to edit a reprint of Mosheim's 
Ecclesiastical History, to which he added a variety of valuable 
annotations. In the year 1849 he had occasion to repel an 
attack made upon his history by Dr. Elrington, of Trinity 
College, Dublin. At that time he published a number of 
letters in vindication of his statements ; and, in the end, the 
substantial correctness of his narrative was admitted by Dr. 



262 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

Elrington liimself. His remains lie interred in the Sighthill 
Cemetery, in the neighbourhood of Glasgow. He left behind 
him a widoAV, six sons, and three daughters. 

We are happy to be able to add that the Irish department 
of Dr. Reid's most valuable library was purchased by 
the General Assembly. It will thus be handed down in the 
Irish Presbyterian Church as a memorial of its historian. 
Many of the volumes are extremely rare, and not a few of 
them contain important manuscript notes, written by Dr. 
Eeid himself. After his death, the Government, with a con- 
siderate kindness, which elicited universal commenda- 
tion, settled a pension of dBlOO per annum upon his 
family. At his death, Dr. Reid left a considerable portion 
of an additional volume of the History of the Presb^jtcrian 
Church in Ireland in a state ready for publication. He had 
also carefully revised the two volumes previously published. 



THE EEV. JAMES CARLILE, D.D. 

On the 31st of March, 1854, the Eev. James Carlile, D.D., 
died at his residence in Dublin. His health had been for a 
considerable time declining, and his demise had been long 
anticipated. Dr. Carlile was a Christian of the highest type, 
and a minister of great ability and learning. His father was 
an eminent merchant of Paisley, and one of the magistrates 
of the town — so that his son enjoyed all the advantages of a 
superior education and of highly cultivated society. Dr. 
Carlile was. settled as one of the ministers of Mary's Abbey, 
Dublin, in May, 1813. On several important occasions he 
distinguished himself in the Synod of Ulster by his talents 
as a debater. When the Irish National System of Education 
was established he was appointed one of the Commissioners, 
and to him the country is indebted for some of the best of 
the school-books issued by the Board. Late in life Dr. 
Carlile took charge of the Birr Mission, and for a consider- 
able number of years acted as the pastor of the Birr 
congregation. He was remarkable for single-mindedness. 
He never seemed to consider his own interest or his own 
credit, and no matter what course he pursued in reference to 
any deb-ated question, his brethren felt that he was entitled 
to their respect. He was an excellent linguist, and it is said 
that at an early period of his ministry he had read through 



BIOGKAPHICAL NOTICES. 263 

the whole of the Old. Testament in the original Hebrew. He 
has left behind several works of standard excellence. On 
his death-bed he exhibited singular serenity and cheerful- 
ness. " Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright, for 
the end of that man is peace." 

JOHN EDGAE, D.D., LL.D. 

Dr. Edgar was born near Ballynahinch in the early part 
of the year 1798. His father, the Rev. Samuel Edgai*, D.D., 
was minister of the Secession Church of that place, and also 
Professor of Divinity for the Secession Synod. When a 
student at the Belfast Academical Institution, John Edo-ar 
obtained distinguished honours, having carried off no less 
than four silver medals. On November 4th, 1820, he was 
ordained by the Seceding Presbytery of Down to the pastoral 
charge of the small congregation of Alfred Place, Belfast ; 
and, in 1826, he succeeded his father as Professor of Divinity 
for the Secession Church. In 1829 he commenced the 
Temperance Reformation. His efforts to promote the 
establishment of temperance societies were prodigious. For 
this purpose he travelled, not only throughout the four 
provinces of Ireland, but also throughout Scotland and 
England. He published a vast number of tracts, sermons, 
and speeches on the subject. It has been calculated that 
the number of copies of his publications wliich have obtained 
circulation amount to upwards of a quarter of a million. He 
founded the Ulster Eemale Penitentiary, and rendered 
important service to almost all the benevolent institutions of 
Belfast. He resigned the pastoral charge of the congrega- 
tion of Alfred Street in 1848, and, on the death of Dr. 
Hanna, became sole Professor of Systematic Divinity for the 
General Assembly. At the time of the famine in 1847, he 
raised a fund of many thousand pouuds for the relief of the 
starving population of Connaught, and afterwards established 
many churches and schools in that province. In 1859 he 
visited America, in company with Messrs. Wilson and Dill, 
and returned home with ,£6,000 to assist in the evangeliza- 
tion of Ireland, He subsequently obtained contributions to 
the amount of ^18,000 for the Church, Manse, and School 
Fund. He died in Dublin on the morning of the Sabbath, 
the 26th August, 1866. 



264 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

THE EEV. JAMES MOEGAN, D.D. 

Dr. Morgan was a native of Cookstown, where lie was 
"bom on the 11th of June, 1799. His parents were pious and 
highly respectable. When very young he was brought under 
deep religious impressions, and he was thus led to turn his 
thoughts to the ministry as his future profession. During 
his attendance at College he was known to all his fellows as 
a student of whose eminent godliness there could be no 
doubt whatever. On the 21st of June, 1820 — when barely 
twenty -one years of age — he was ordained by the Presbytery 
of Dublin as minister of Carlow. There had at one time 
been a Presbyterian congregation in that place, but it had 
become extinct about seventy years before. Under the 
young minister the newly-established chui*ch enjoyed great 
prosperity. When at Carlow, Mr. Morgan became acquainted 
with a goodly number of the most devoted of the clergy of 
the Established Church, and with them he enjoyed much 
pleasant and profitable fellowship. He took an interest in 
the great evangelical movements of the day, and did much 
to promote the progress of the Bible Society. At that time 
he also became acquainted with Dr. Doyle — the famous J. 
K. L., the Roman Catholic Bishop of Kildare and Leighlin 
■ — for whose character he ever afterwards entertained a 
sincere respect. About four years after his settlement at 
Carlow, Mr. Morgan removed to Lisburn, where he was 
installed on the 23rd of June, 1824. His ministry there 
j^roduced a great impression. As a preacher he was singularly 
popular. His voice was excellent ; his manner was grave 
and dignified ; his expositions of Scripture were simple and 
j^ractical ; and all his addresses from the pulpit were 
remarkable for their evangelical unction. After remaining 
somewhat more than four years in Lisburn, he was removed 
to Belfast, where he was installed as minister of the newly- 
erected congregation of Pisherwick Place on the 4th of 
November, 1828. The capital of Ulster did not then con- 
tain the one-fourth part of its present population, and 
among all classes there was much indifference in regard to 
religion. The settlement of Mr. Morgan in it marks an era 
in its spii'itual history. He declined to attend merely 
fashionable parties, where the evening was to be spent in 
card-playing or dancing. He gave all to understand that he 
was a minister of God ; and that if they did not wish for his 



BIOGBAPHICAL NOTICES. 265 

services in that capacity, they must dispense with his 
presence. Society, where his influence extended, began to 
assume a new tone ; and wherever he spent an evening the 
conversation was good to the use of edifying, and religious 
exercises were never neglected. The large church of Fisher- 
wick Place was soon filled by a congregation of attentive and 
devout worshippers. At that period the duty of spreading 
the Gospel had been greatly overlooked, and Mr. Morgan's 
first appeal to the congregation of Fisherwick Place, on 
behalf of the Home Mission of the Synod of Ulster, only 
elicited a contribution of £5. The Temperance movement 
originated the year after he became an inhabitant of Belfast ; 
he joined ardently with Dr. Edgar in the cause ; and he was 
one of the first subscribers to the Temperance Pledge. 
About the same time the Arians separated from the Synod 
of Ulster ; a monthly magazine called The Orthodox Presby- 
terian was started in support of those adhering to the West- 
minster Standards ; and Mr. Morgan long acted as the editor 
of this pvxblication. The project of a union between the 
Secession Synod and the Synod of Ulster had Mr. Morgan's 
most cordial approval, and its consummation filled him with 
the highest satisfaction. The union was auspiciously 
inaugurated by the establishment of the Foreign Mission of 
the General Assembly. Mr. Morgan was appointed Secretary 
or Convener of the Committee in charge of this new enter- 
prise. It was then considered by many a very bold under- 
taking when the United Church pledged itself to support two 
missionaries to the heathen ; but from the first the congrega- 
tion of Fisherwick Place entered heartily into the scheme, and 
stimulated many others to generosity by its large contribu- 
tions. The number of missionaries was gradually increased ; 
a large bequest from Mrs. Magee, of Dublin, rendered im- 
portant sei-vice ; and the Foreign Mission prospered greatly. 
Shortly after the union, the establishment of a Presbyterian 
College began to occupy the attention of the Church ; and 
the minister of Fisherwick Place did perhaps more than any 
other single individual to raise the funds required for the 
erection of Assembly's College, Belfast. About this time he 
received the degree of D.D. from the University of Glasgow. 
Dr. Morgan acted systematically in all his proceedings ; and 
thus it was that, with apparent ease, he could accomplish so 
much. When he acted as Moderator of the Assembly in 
1846 the annual meeting of the supreme court of the Church 



266 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

■was the shortest on record; for with admirable tact he 
managed to repress useless speechifying; the whole business 
was well done; but every one was kept to the point im- 
mediately under discussion, and no time was wasted. Dr. 
Morgan has left behind him various important publications. 
Among these may be mentioned his treatise on the Lord's 
Supper, his work on the Holy Spirit, and his exposition of 
the 1st Epistle of John. He possessed a truly catholic 
spirit, and cultivated a good understanding with ministers of 
other denominations. His constitution was never robust ; 
and after a lingering illness, during which he enjoyed 
abundantly the peace of God, he died on the 5th of August, 
1873, in the 75th year of his age. 

THE EEV. HENRY COOKE, D.D., LL.D. 

De. Cooke was born in a cottage near Maghera on the 
11th of May, 1788. As he grew up he enjoyed no superior 
advantages in the way of education. When a mere boy he 
entered G-lasgow College ; but, partly owing to his youth, 
and partly to his want of sufficient preparation, he was not 
specially distinguished as a student either in literature or 
science. It was not until nearly the close of his career at 
the Scottish University that some of the professors discovered 
indications of those extraordinary powers which afterwards 
attracted so much attention. When still very young he was 
ordained as assistant to the Rev. Robert Scott, the aged 
minister of Duncan, on the 10th of JSTovember, 1808. This 
appointment supplied him with a very slender maintenance 
— amounting, we believe, to about <£30 per annum — and on 
the 13th of November, 1810, he resigned the situation. For 
a short time afterwards he resided as tutor in the family of 
the late Alexander Brown, Esq., of Kells, near Ballymena. 
During his residence there he greatly signalised himself by 
the ability he displayed when unexpectedly required to 
officiate on a Sacramental Sabbath. The congregation of 
Connor, to which Mr. Brown belonged, is, as many of our 
readers are aware, one of the largest in connection with the 
Presbyterian Church in Ireland. It then reckoned a thousand 
families, and the services on communion occasions were quite 
sufficient to task the energies of two or three ministers. At 
such times the Rev. Henry Henry, the worthy pastor, had 
usually two assistants. It so happened, however, that one 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 267 

of his helpers failed him ; and when about to enter the pulpit 
on the morning of the Sacramental day, he received an 
intimation to the effect that the other, in consequence of an 
accident, was unable to attend. To add to the perplexity, 
when Mr. Henry had gone through the preparatory exercises, 
and when he was addressing the first table, he became 
unwell, and was, with difficulty, able to finish his addi-ess. 
What was now to be done ? Six tables remained ; the 
services of each commonly occupied half an hour ; and even 
the presiding minister was laid aside. In this emergency 
the elders bethought themselves of the young preacher who 
was residing in the family of Mr. Brown, and who happened 
to be present. Mr. Cooke at once responded to their appli- 
cation for aid ; and, greatly to the satisfaction of all who 
heard him, conducted all the rest of the service. He 
delivered six consecutive table addresses, equally varied and 
appropriate, to the astonishment and delight of his auditors. 
Shortly after his resignation of Dunean, Mr. Cooke received 
a call from the highly respectable congregation of Donegore, 
where he was installed as pastor on the 22nd of January, 
1811. His fame now rapidly increased ; he began to attract 
notice at the annual meetings of the Synod of Ulster ; and 
his services were occasionally solicited, even by congregations 
in Belfast, on public occasions. When in Donegore he was 
permitted for some time to attend the University of Dublin, 
where he applied himself specially to the study of medicine. 
At this period he was in the habit of travelling every Satur- 
day to Carlow, and of preaching on the Lord's day to a 
congregation recently collected in that place. Mr. Cooke 
was minister of Donegore upwards of seven years. He then 
removed to Killyleagh, where he was inducted into the 
pastoral charge on the 8th of September, 1818. Though in 
his thii'd congregation he was still only thirty years of age. 
About this period he became acquainted with a gentleman 
from whose intercourse he derived much benefit, and whose 
rame should be mentioned with reverence by all leal- hearted 
members of the Presbyterian Church to the latest genera- 
tions. Captain Sidney Hamilton Rowan, a scion of the 
noble house of Clandeboye and Clanbrassil, was then a 
member of the Killyleagh congregation, in which he acted as 
an elder with exemplary faithfulness. He exercised the 
happiest influence over the mind of the young minister. Mr. 
Cooke had, indeed, before professed the doctrines of the 



268 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

Westminster Confession of Faith ; but his principles were 
not matured ; and he had not hitherto been known as a 
champion of Orthodoxy, A sermon which he published 
when in Donegore is tainted with the spirit of the prevailing 
moderatism. On his settlement in Killyleagh he applied 
himself earnestly to the study of the system of evangelical 
truth, and in 1821 appeared publicly as the assailant of 
Arianism. The Unitarians of England had become so con- 
fident that they employed one of their ministers, named 
Smithurst, to propagate their principles in the North of 
Ireland. When visiting Ulster their missionary did not 
overlook Killyleagh, as it was understood there were some 
who might be expected to sympathise with him in that neigh- 
bourhood. Mr. Cooke and his elder were present at the 
service ; and, at the close, Captain Rowan stood up and said 
to the stranger, " These are not the doctrines our minister 
teaches, and here he is." Mr. Smithurst professed his 
readiness to enter forthwith into discussion ; but Mr. Cooke, 
not yet much practised in debate, and in the presence of an 
adversary who came armed at all points, deemed it prudent 
to use a little caution. He said that as Mr. Smithurst had 
chosen his own time and manner of procedure, he would do 
the same — that he would, on an early day, before his own 
congregation, refute the statements advanced ; and then, 
should the stranger wish to reply, he would be prepared to 
meet him in discussion. About thisjieriod Mr. Cooke is said 
to have shut himself up day after day in his own meeting- 
house, as the most retired place to which he could resort, and 
to have studied with intense care the great doctrine of which 
he was henceforth to be so distinguished an advocate. In 
due time he more than fulfilled the pledge he had given to 
the Unitarian apostle. After having vindicated the Deity of 
Christ in his own pulpit, he followed Mr. Smithurst to 
Downpatrick, Saintfield, and other towns adjacent, whei'e he 
replied to the discourses of the missionary in the hearing of 
large and attentive audiences. Discovering that he had an 
antagonist with whom he could not grapple, the Englishman 
soon found it expedient to return to his own country." 
About this time the influence of the Arian party began to 
preponderate in the management of the Belfast Academical 
Institution. The election of the late Eev. William Bruce to 
the Professorship of Greek created much dissatisfaction ; and 
soon afterwards the Arian controversy fairly commenced in 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 269 

the Synod of Ulster. Mi'. Cooke was at once recognised as 
the leader of the Orthodox majority, and the discussions at 
the annual Synodical meetings awakened intense interest all 
over the province. The champion of Trinitarianism had to 
contend against no common antagonists, as the late Dr. 
Montgomery of Dunmurry, one of the most brilliant speakers 
of his day, backed by a considerable number of able sup- 
portei's, formed the opposition. The exertions of Mr. Cooke 
at this time were prodigious. Whilst leading his party with 
consummate ability in the Church Courts, he was obliged to 
repel many assaults made on him in the newspapers. He 
encountered his adversaries on the platform, and assailed 
their principles in the pulpit. When the struggle was 
approaching a crisis, he itinerated throughout many parts of 
Ulster ; preached more than once almost daily ; roused 
ministers and people to a sense of the importance of the 
emergency ; and thus prepai'ed the way for the victory which 
he soon afterwards achieved. The announcement of his 
appearance in any locality was sure to attract a large 
audience. His magnificent voice, his noble elocution, his 
stirring eloquence, and his masterly expositions of his great 
theme produced an immense impression. The people felt 
that the Calvinism which they loved was illustrated by the 
genius of a true orator, and they hung with admiration on 
his lips. Immediately after the separation of the Arian 
party from the Synod of Ulster in 1829, Mr. Cooke removed 
from Killyleagh to Belfast, where he ministered neai-ly forty 
years. For a large portion of this period he conducted three 
services every Lord's day in May Street Church. We have 
heard it stated, on excellent authority, that on his first settle- 
ment in the capital of Ulster, the Sabbath collections, con- 
sisting almost exclusively of halfpence, amounted to d£10 
daily. All strangers who visited Belfast were sure to repair 
to May Street to hear the great Presbyterian preacher ; and, 
until old age began to impair his energies, his popularity 
remained unabated. Even in his declining years the " old 
man eloquent " often electrified his audience by flashes of his 
youthful fire. About the time of his settlement in Belfast, 
Mr. Cooke received the degree of D.D. from Jefferson College, 
United States. Trinity College, Dublin, subsequently be- 
stowed upon him the degree of LL.D. In 1824 he was 
Moderator of the Synod of Ulster. In 1841, the year after 
its formation, he was unanimously elected Moderator of the 



270 BIOGKAPHICAL NOTICES. 

General Assembly. In 1862 he was re-elected. In 1847 he 
was chosen Professor of Sacred Rhetoric and Catechetics in 
the Assembly's College, Belfast. In 1846 he was appointed 
by Her Majesty's Government Distributor of the Recjium 
Donum for the Synod of Ulster. He held this office till his 
death. Dr. Cooke has left behind him little that will give 
posterity a true idea of his extraordinary powers, for he may 
be pronounced one of the most gifted of Irishmen. The 
Irish Presbyterian Church has possessed men of more 
extensive learning ; but she never, perhaps, had a minister of 
such rare genius. His name will live in the history of this 
country ; and, on one memorable occasion, he attracted the 
attention of the whole empire by the intrepidity with which 
he rolled back the tide of the Repeal agitation. When the 
late Daniel O'Connell appeared in Belfast to prosecute his 
favourite scheme, Dr. Cooke challenged hiin to discuss 
publicly the merits of the question ; and when the great 
demagogue shrunk from the encounter, he exposed himself 
to intolerable derision. O'Connell soon found that the 
atmosphere of the North did not suit him ; and the hero of 
so many monster meetings, who could wield at will the fierce 
democracy in Leinster, Connaught, and Munster, was obliged 
to take his departure from Belfast under the protection of a 
strong escort of police and military. On another occasion, 
when the late Rev. Dr. Ritchie of Edinburgh came to Belfast 
to prosecute the agitation of the Voluntary question, and 
when, supported by a number of Irish brethren who held his 
views, he met Dr. Cooke in a public discussion, the May 
Street minister single-handed was^more than a match for all 
his antagonists. It is well known that, before the challenge 
was accepted, he had made no special preparation for the 
debate ; but, with the help of one or two literary friends, he 
speedily marshalled his materials ; and such was the 
versatility of his talent, and so wonderful the quickness of 
his apprehension, that he appeared on the arena as if armed 
at all points. It was on emergencies of this kind that his 
powers appeared to peculiar advantage, for his most brilliant 
speeches were purely extempore. At such times wit and 
irony, logic and declamation, imagination and passion, were 
called simultaneously into play, and their combined effect 
was irresistible. In 1829, when the late Dr. Montgomery 
attacked him in a carefully prepared speech of three hours' 
duration, Dr. Cooke replied impromptu. JPor two hours his 



BIOGKAPHICAL NOTICES. 271 

auditors listened to an outpouring of eloquence such as they 
had never heard before. Their enthusiasm rose as he 
advanced ; they at length found it totally impossible to 
repress their feelings ; and, towai'ds the close, he was 
frequently interrupted by thunders of applause. On that 
decisive day Arianism received its death-blow in the supreme 
court of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. The Irish 
Presbyterian Church is specially bound to honour the 
memory of Dr. Cooke. To him, under God, it has been 
mainly indebted for its deliverance from the incubus of 
Unitarianism. His life was devoted to the service of his 
Church, and in labours he was most abundant. His assiduity 
in attending Church Courts was very exemplary. Until he 
was bowed down by the infirmities of old age, he was to be 
seen early and late in his place in the Presbytery, the Synod, 
and the Assembly. His interest in the business never seemed 
to flag ; and, in cases of ditficulty, his brethren were often 
greatly indebted to him for sound advice. After an illness 
of several months' duration, he died on Sabbath, the 13th of 
December, 1868, in the eighty-first year of his age, and the 
sixty-first of his ministry. His remains were honoured by a 
jiublic funeral. All classes and denominations joined in the 
demonstration of respect. His statue, standing in front of 
the Rojal Academical Institution, is a life-like likeness of 
this great orator. 

WILLIAM KIKK, ESQ. 

Me. Kirk was a native of Larue, in the County of Antrim. 
He was trained to the linen business by his maternal uncles, 
the Messrs. Millar, who carried on that branch of trade very 
extensively in the neighbourhood of Ballymena. His uncle, 
Captain William Millar, was a Justice of the Peace for the 
County Antrim, and possessed considerable landed proj)erty 
at a place called the Ross, not far from the village of Connor. 
At an early period of life Mr. Kirk removed to Armagh, 
where he acted for some time as agent for one of the Belfast 
banks. He subsequently settled at Keady, where he long 
most successfully carried on the linen business. Some years 
before his death he purchased the Keady estate, compris- 
ing about eleven thousand acres. This estate is in a highly 
improved condition. Some of the finest machinery in Ireland 
is erected on it. The post town of Keady has grown, within 



272 BIOGEAPHICAL NOTICES. 

the last fifty or sixty years, from a poor village into a place 
of considerable size, with a thriving population. It was a 
pleasant sight to see Mr. Kirk on the Lord's day sitting in 
the Keady Presbyterian Church, like a i^atriarch, in the 
midst of his tenantry. In many other parts of Ulster the 
landlord frequents one place of worship and the tenantry 
another ; but here the lord of the soil was not the less honoured 
because he met for worship with the farmers and cottiers 
on his estate. Mr. Kirk long acted as a Justice of the 
Peace, and a member of the Grand Jury of the County 
Armagh. He was also a Deputy-Lieutenant of the County. 
In 1868 he was returned a third time as M.P. for Newry. 
When he previously represented the borough he was univer- 
sally regarded as one of the most able and intelligent of the 
members for Ireland. 

JOHN GETTY, ESQ., BEECHPAP.K, BELFAST. 

Laene holds a distinguished place in the history of the 
Irish Presbyterian Church. From an early period it has 
enjoyed the services of eminent ministers ; and some of the 
best lay friends of Presbytery have been found in its neigh- 
bourhood. The Shaws of Ballygally, whose grand old castle 
may still be seen by the traveller as be passes to Glenarm, 
once ranked amongst its most steadfast supporters. The 
Agnews of Kilwaughter Castle, in former days, wei*e also 
attached to its communion. The late William Kirk, Esq. — 
so long M.P. for Newry, and so well known for his services 
to the Church of his fathers — was a native of Larne. Sir 
Edward Coey — now a household name among the Presby- 
terians of Down and Antrim — was born in the same locality. 
During the year 1874 the Irish Presbyterian Church was 
reminded in another way how much slie owes to Larne. 
Mr. John Getty, who died in April, 1874, was born there. 
One of his ancestors was a minister of Larne ; and to the last 
Mr. Getty cherished a strong attachment to the place of his 
nativity. For many years he carried on business in Belfast ; 
he was universally respected as a merchant ; and he at 
length acquired a considerable fortune. In early life he had 
been brought under deep religious impressions ; and through- 
out a long career he sustained the character of an humble 
and consistent Christian. As he had no family — for he 
never married — his household wants were easily supplied ; 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 273 

and for many years he was in the habit of devoting the 
large i-esidue of his annual income to benevolent and religious 
objects. His liberality was soon widely known ; and very 
many were the applications for assistance he received from 
all quarters. Every good cause was sure to receive supjjort 
from him. When he thought the claim deserved it, he did 
not hesitate to give d£500 in a single donation. He was 
always well supplied with <£5 and d810 notes ; and he 
evidently took special pleasure in their distribution. His 
brother Robert — who was his partner in business, and who 
died unmarried several years before him — was a man of a 
kindred spirit. Both devoted their substance to the advance- 
ment of religion. Any one who looked into the countenance 
of the late Mr. John Gretty might discover an illustration of the 
truth of the statement of Scripture that wisdom's ways are 
ways of pleasantness, and that all her paths are paths of 
peace. Though living almost in solitude, he was a cheerful 
and happy man. He had realised the comforts of religion. 
He will be known in all time to come as one of the largest 
benefactors of Irish Presbyterianism. By his will he 
bequeathed property in pei-petuity worth d£3,000 per annum 
to the General Assembly — chiefly for missionary purposes. 
He died at his residence at Beechpark, after an illness of some 
continuance, in the 78th year of his age. 

JAMES KENNEDY, ESQ., J.P. 

On the 12th of September, 1878, James Kennedy, Esq., of 
Eosetta, near Belfast, finished his mortal career. He had fur 
many years held the commission of the peace for the two 
counties of Down and Antrim ; and had long been well known 
as one of the most enterprising, intelligent, and prosperous 
citizens of the capital of Ulster. He had been brought up 
under the pastoral care of the late Dr. Hanna, of Rosemary 
Street Presbyterian Church ; and in his later years he took 
pleasure in recounting the number of useful and distinguished 
fellow-citizens who in youth had enjoyed the pastoral in- 
structions of that eminently evangelical minister. Mr. 
Kennedy was subsequently a member of May Street Presby- 
terian Church ; and, though differing in political views from 
its gifted pastor, he greatly admired Dr. Cooke, because of 
his genius, his eloquence, his benevolence, and his Christian 
chivalry. In his declining years Mr. Kennedy was connected 



274 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

with the Presbyterian congregation of Newtownbreda. In 
the Assembly's College, Belfast, of which he was a trustee, 
he always evinced the deepest interest. He may be consi- 
dered as the founder of the Students' Chambers ; he again 
and again made contributions to the College Library ; and 
the curious Japanese bell — with the tones of which the stu- 
dents are so familiar — is his gift. Mr. Kennedy was strongly 
attached, by intelligent conviction, to the doctrine and polity 
of the Presbyterian Church ; and, when in company with 
persons of other denominations he found it necessary to repel 
attacks made upon it ; he could defend it with singular tact, 
good temper, and ability. At the time of his death Mr. 
Kennedy had approached the mature age of three score and 
ten. 

WILLIAM M'COMB, ESQ. 

Mr. M'Comb was born at Coleraine on the 17th of August, 
1793. His father was engaged in business in Londonderry, 
and as he had frequently occasion to visit the capital of 
Ulster in the way of trade, he became acquainted with Mr. 
Thomas O'Neill, a well-known Belfast merchant, who had a 
wholesale warehouse in Donegall Street. His son William 
was apprenticed to this gentleman ; and he thus formed an 
intimacy with Sinclare Eamsey, a youth of kindred spirit, 
who was being trained in the same establishment. At this 
period infidel principles were propagated with zeal in the 
North of Ireland, and the disciples of Thorn Paine had set 
up a school in Smithfield, where they disseminated their 
pernicious doctrines. The two young apprentices had the 
Christian courage to attempt to counteract this movement, 
and for some time conducted a Sabbath-school in the same 
locality. This was one of the earliest Sabbath- schools 
established in Belfast. Mr. M'Comb had a taste for teaching, 
and for years he conducted with great success the Brown 
Street Daily School. He took a deep interest in the Arian 
controversy, and with the view of giving increased circulation 
to a sound religious literature, he commenced his career in 
High Street, Belfast, in 1828, as a bookseller and publisher. 
Shortly afterwards a monthly periodical, under the title of 
" The Orthodox Presbyterian," was started by the leaders of 
the Synod of Ulster, for the purpose of expounding their 
views, and of defending themselves against the assaults of 
the Unitarians. The original editors were Dr. James Seaton 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 275 

Eeid, the Historian of the Irish Presbyterian Church ; Dr. 
Cooke, and Dr. Morgan ; but its management devolved 
chiefly on the minister of Fisherwick Place. Mr. M'Comb 
was the publisher ; and, at a most critical period in the 
history of Irish Presbyterianism, this magazine rendered 
efficient service to the Orthodox cause. At a later period the 
subject of this notice commenced the Presbyterian Almanac,* 
with which his name is still associated. Mr. M'Comb 
cherished an enthusiastic admiration of Dr. Cooke, to whom 
he had a considerable resemblance in personal appearance ; 
and in June, 1842, when the great Presbyterian leader — 
then the Moderator of the General Assembly — repaired to 
Carrickfergus to celebrate the bi-centenary of the erection of 
the first Irish Presbytery in that classic town, he was 
accompanied by the poet-laureate of the Church, On that 
occasion Mr. M'Comb was stirred up to compose one of the 
happiest of his metrical productions. f This bi-centenary 
poem called forth the special applause of Dr. Chalmers. At 
a much earlier date Mr. M'Comb had signalised himself in 
this department of literature. His " Dirge of O'Neill " 
appeared in 1817, and his " School of the Sabbath " in 1822. 
A few months previous to his retiring from business in 
1864, he published, in a handsome volume, a complete 
edition of his poems. Some of them are very tender ; some 
exhibit a fine appreciation of the beauties of nature ; and all 
are evidently the production of a devout spirit. He took an 
active interest in the education of the dumb, the deaf, and 
the blind; and when an institution for their benefit was 
about to be established in Belfast, he wrote some beautiful 
verses, which awakened much public sympathy in favour of 
the movement. He was an ardent lover of flowers, and spent 
many pleasant hours in his garden attending to their cultiva- 
tion. He died at his residence in Colin View Terrace, 
Belfast, in the eightieth year of his age, on the 13th of 
September, 1873. He left behind him a widow and an only 
daughter. 



* The first issue was for the year 1840, 
t "Two Hundred Years Ago." 



276 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

THE EEV. WILLIAM M'CLUEE, DEEEY. 

This well-beloved and distinguislied minister, wlio closed 
Lis mortal course on tlie 22nd February, 1874, was the son 
of William M'Clure, Esq., a highly respectable Belfast 
merchant. His mother was the daughter of the Eev. John 
Thomson, of Carnmoney, a man who in his day was one of 
the leading members of the Synod of Ulster. Until the 
year 1825, the Synod had no printed code of discipline ; but 
Mr. Thomson was thoroughly acquainted with Church law ; 
and, in cases of difficulty, his decision as to the course of 
7>rocedure commanded general deference. Mr. M'Clure was 
licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Ballymena ; 
and in 1825 he was ordained as one of the pastors of the 
Presbyterian Church of Derry, and as colleague to the Eev. 
George Hay. He had a very pleasing voice, and excellent 
delivery ; and his discourses exhibited a pure taste and an 
evangelical spirit. He soon became known all over the 
church as a most kind-hearted, zealous, and upright minister. 
He was the very soul of hospitality, and a fine specimen of 
a Christian gentleman. For nearly thirty years he acted as 
Convener of the Colonial Mission of the General Assembly. 
To the young ministers who emigrated to the Colonies, he 
acted the part of a father ; and his memory will be long 
cherished by many who are now settled at the ends of the 
earth. In the city of Deny he possessed much social influ- 
ence. He was one of the authors of the " Plea of Presby- 
tery ;" and in 1847 he was chosen unanimously to the office of 
Moderator of the General Assembly. At the time of his 
death he was nearly 73 years of age. Sir Thomas M'Clure, 
Bart., of Belmont, Belfast, is his only surviving brother. 

SYDNEY HAMILTON EOWAN, ESQ. 

Captain Eowan was bom in 1789. He was the son of 
Archibald Hamilton Eowan, Esq., who was the lord of the 
manor of Killyleagh, and who was connected with the noble 
houses of Dufferin, Bangor, and Eoden. Mr. A. H. Eowan, 
though a nominal Presbyterian, held Unitarian views, and 
was implicated in the treasonable proceedings connected 
with the rebellion of 1798. His son in early life joined the 
army ; and it was when in England on military duty that he 
was bi'ought under deep i*eligious impressions. After some 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 277 

time lie gave up the life of an officer, and settled at Killy- 
leagh. His eminent piety soon attracted attention, and he 
was chosen a ruling elder. He was in this position, when 
Mr. (afterwards Dr.) Cooke was chosen minister of the 
congregation ; and his influence with the young pastor soon 
led to most important results. He had much to do with the 
commencement of the controversy which terminated in the 
removal of the Arian party from the Synod of Ulster. At a 
later period of his life he removed to Downpatrick, and he 
was mainly instrumental in establishing there the present 
congregation connected with the General Assembly. He 
was one of the first elders of the new congregation. 
He died at Downpatrick on Sabbath evening, the 14th 
of November, 1847, in the 58th year of his age. Di*. 
Cooke delivered the funeral address, of which the following 
is an extract : — " He was one whose examj)le recom- 
mended the religion he professed. In him the rich and 
the poor, the learned and the ignorant — the young in 
their joyousness, and the aged in their sorrows — in him 
each read that religion was a reality. The example mani- 
fested itself especially in plans and works of benevolence. 
His was not a religion of many words. It lay more in the 
deep thoughts, the fixed purposes, the sympathetic feelings, 
and the untiring energies of well-doing. His heart was a 
heart of love. He sought and seized every opportunity of 
doing good. For the erection of schoolhouses and the 
organization of Sabbath and Daily Schools, his best exertions 
were put forth. jSTor can I overlook his invaluable contribu- 
tions to our schools and families in his admirable edition of 
the Shorter Catechism ; a work which, however simple (for 
everything truly Scriptural is simple), will remain a monu- 
ment of his profound knowledge of evangelical principles, 
and of his successful efforts for their propagation. Let me 
turn your attention to a kindred view of the character of our 
departed brother — his zeal and liberality in the cause of 
Christian missions. He was the founder of our Home 
Mission, which originated in the Synod of Ulster, and from 
which, as from a root which the Lord has blessed, has sprung 
up our Foreign Missions to the heathen and the Jews. Our 
Church Extension cause has also been deeply indebted to 
him — nor would it be difficult to point to several of our most 
hopeful settlements that, under divine providence, owe their 
existence entirely to his zeal and labours. When we think 



278 BIOGEAPHICAL NOTICES, 

of his memory our soitow must be mingled with joy — with 
sorrow because he is gone, but with joy for the graces with 
which God had endowed him, and the blessed and abiding 
work which he was called and enabled to effect. And the 
power by which, under God, all these things were done was 
the power of humble, unostentatious, ardent piety, which 
conducted to self-denial, self-restraint, and self-government : 
a piety which looked upon self, till self became as nothing : 
a piety which looked upon Christ till Christ became ' all in 
all.' One other feature in the character of our departed 
brother may not be omitted — his sterling, unswerving, indes- 
tructible friendship, of which so many are private witnesses, 
and of which a public evidence may be seen in his firm and 
unswerving attachment to the Presbyterian Church — the 
Church of his Fathers and of his Fatherland. Under repul- 
sive agencies from within, and attractive agencies from with- 
out, he still adopted the motto of his noble ancestor,* ' I 
adhere to the Presbyterians.' We undervalue not the 
excellencies of any faithful Protestant Church ; we heartily 
wish them all ' God speed ;' but we glory in the memory 
of the man who laboured, prayed, and wrote for the purity 
and efficiency of our Zion." 

WILLIAM TODD, ESQ., OF RATHGAE. 

This gentleman died on the 12th September, 1881, at the 
advanced age of seventy-nine. He was a Scotchman by 
birth, but he was long resident in Ireland, and, as a mer- 
chant in Dublin, he acquired an ample fortune. Strongly 
attached to the Presbyterian Church, he contributed to its 
various schemes with princely generosity. The Assembly's 
College, Belfast, of which he was a trustee from the time of 
its erection, had a large share in his benefactions. Very 
recently he was one of the five contributors who gave .£1,000 
each to its Professorial Endowment Fund. The Magee 
College, Londonderry, also received from him a number of 
most generous gifts. For about forty years he acted as an 
elder of the Presbyterian Church, Adelaide Eoad, Dublin ; 
and, notwithstanding his advanced age, he continued to a 
comparatively late date to attend regularly the weekly prayer 
meeting, as well as the noon-day and evening diets for wor- 
ship on the Lord's Day. He died full of faith and hope. 

* The first Lord Clandeboye. 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 279 

Immediately before he ceased to breathe, his face became 
suddenly lit up as with heavenly radiance, and his eyes 
seemed to be gazing with delight on the opening glories of 
the better land. 

MISS HAMILTON, OF MOUNT VEENOK 

The Irish Presbyterian Church has been adorned by many 
" honourable women," but it has seldom possessed so fine a 
specimen of female excellence as that presented by the late 
Miss Elizabeth Hamilton, of Mount Vernon, near Belfast. 
Though of the most gentle and unobtrusive disposition, the 
light of her piety could not remain concealed ; and for upwards 
of thirty years she was known all over the North of Ireland as 
one of the most generous supporters of every Christian enter- 
prise. She used to say that she would wish to have a stone in 
every new place of worship, and every new manse erected by the 
Assembly. She took the deepest interest in all the Missions 
of the Church : in the year of famine she exerted herself 
much for the relief of the suffering poor in Connaught ; and 
she was one of the largest contributors towards the building 
of the Assembly's College. Miss Hamilton valued much 
the privilege of a gospel ministry ; and was most exemplary 
in her attendance on Sabbath ordinances. She stimulated 
many to works of benevolence : and her name should be 
held in honour by the Irish Presbyterian Church to the 
latest generations. She knew from experience that it is " more 
blessed to give than to receive," and she never appeared to 
be so happy as when performing some act of munificence. 
This excellent lady died in peace at Mount Vernon, during 
the week of prayer, on the 6th of January, 1869. 



JOHN SINCLAIE, ESQ., OF THE GEOVE. 

During the year 1856 BeKast lost one of her worthiest and 
most distinguished citizens. On the 17th day of January 
of that year John Sinclair, Esq., departed this life, aged 
47. Mr. Sinclair was a man of few words, but his deeds 
were most eloquent. In his native town he introduced a 
new scale of giving for the cause of the Gospel. Every one 
admitted that he was endowed with superior intellect, and 
that he possessed mercantile genius of the highest order, so 



280 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

that his large donations at first created much astonishment. 
But others at length caught the infection of his generosity, 
and not a few began to wonder that they did not sooner see 
how pitiful had been their religious contributions. The 
Conlig Presbyterian Church was built almost entirely at his 
expense. Shortly before his death, Mr. Sinclair, with his 
partner, gave the princely subscription of <£1,000 to the 
Church and Manse Fund of the General Assembly. It is an 
instructive fact, that this bountiful giver was an eminently 
prosperous merchant. " The Sinclair Seaman's Church " 
will long remain a memorial of the respect in which he was 
held by the community ; for never before has Belfast erected 
such a noble and costly monument to any of her citizens. 
" He being dead yet speaketh ;" and the sight of this edifice 
should be a sermon to evei-y merchant who passes along our 
quays. 

THE EEV. JOHN THOMSON. 

The Rev. John Thomson was born at Shilvodan, near Con- 
nor, in the county Antrim, on the 2nd Januaiy, 1741. He 
was educated at the University of Glasgow, where he en- 
tered the Logic class in 1760. He matriculated in 1761, and 
his name is thus entered in the Register of the University 
in his own hand writing. 

"Johannes Thomson, filius natu secundus Caroli, Mercatoris in 
Comitatu de Antrim in Hibernia." 

During this session he was a student of the Moral Philosophy 
class under the celebrated Adam Smith. He was licensed to 
preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Ballymena, and 
ordained as minister of Carnmoney, near Belfast, on the 
10th of March, 1767, as successor to his uncle, also named 
John Thomson. He thus was placed at an early period of 
life in charge of one of the largest congregations in con- 
nexion with the General Synod of Ulster. In the discharge 
of his ministry he was distinguished by diligence and faith- 
fulness. Never resting contented with the superficial perfor- 
mance of any duty, it was his great aim that everything 
should be done systematically and in the best and most 
efiicient manner. His theology was the theology of the 
Reformation, and of the Westminster Confession of Faith. 
He expounded the doctrines and enforced the truths of the 
gospel, with a power and clearness that could not fail to 



BIOGKAPHICAL NOTICES. 281 

command the attention, and enlighten the understanding. 
At a time when latitudinarian views were somewhat fashion- 
able, and orthodoxy of sentiment was regarded in many- 
quarters with coldness and contempt, he became, if possible, 
more decided and uncompromising than ever, in upholding 
the truth. He always firmly held, and boldly proclaimed 
the whole counsel of God. His preaching was at the same 
time eminently practical. He was careful to shew that 
Christianity did not consist in cold and barren orthodoxy, 
but in real spiritual life — the result of living faith in the 
Son of God. Much as he excelled as a preacher, he did not 
fail in the other departments of the ministry. No man was 
better fitted than he to guide the serious inquirer, to comfort 
the mourner, to reprove, rebuke, and exhort with all long- 
suffering and doctrine. Under his superintendence the 
system of the Presbyterian Church was fully carried out in 
the parish of Carnmoney. The congregation was divided 
into districts, over each of which an elder was placed, and 
the session were accustomed to hold frequent meetings, to 
consider the religious and spiritual condition of the people. 
Public baptism was never discontinued as in other places, 
and banns were proclaimed previous to the celebration of 
marriage. In addition to his pastoral visitations from house 
to house, Mr. Thomson was in the habit of assembling the 
members of his flock, in their respective districts, for special 
religious instruction. The writer of this can never forget 
some occasions of this kind, when in childhood he was per- 
mitted to be present. These scenes were deeply interesting. 
The people, old and young, rich and poor, often met under 
an humble roof. Their venerable pastor was received with 
every token of respect : at his approach their countenances 
filled with delight — in their hearts they welcomed him. 
After the offering of praise and prayer, and the reading of a 
portion of God's Word, the examination proceeded ; and not 
the young merely, but all, of every age, were expected to 
answer. The Shorter Catechism — that admirable compend 
of theology — formed the basis of instruction. Thus were 
the doctrines of the gospel deeply and clearly imjiressed 
upon the mind. Thus did the faithful pastor take heed to 
all the flock committed to his care — thus did he warn every 
man, and teach eveiy man, in all wisdom, that he might pre- 
sent every man perfect in Christ Jesus. Mr. Thomson took 
a very active part in the public affairs of the Church. He 



282 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

had studied witli deep attention its constitution and laws, 
and -was regarded as a high authority in all questions and 
cases of difficulty. In such cases he was almost always ap- 
pealed to for his opinion, and that opinion seldom failed to 
decide the finding of the body. At the request of the 
General Synod of Ulster, he drew up and published an ab- 
stract of its laws and previous decisions, from its earliest 
records to the year 1800. He consequently held a very 
conspicuous place in the courts of the Church, especially in 
the Synod, where his addresses were always heard with the 
utmost attention and respect. For several years previous to 
his death, he had been senior member, or father of that 
reverend body. As a member of Church courts, he was 
eminently distinguished for the correctness of his views, the 
uprightness of his conduct, his unwillingness to swerve in the 
smallest degree from what he knew to be right, and his de- 
termination to enforce, without respect of persons, the most 
strict and rigid discipline. The training of candidates for 
the ministry, was a subject to which he directed much of his 
attention ; and into all the arrangements that were calculated 
to promote their instruction, and prepare them for future 
usefulness, he entered with paternal solicitude. Though he 
had himself been a student of Glasgow college, and naturally 
attached to that ancient and honoured seminary of learning, 
he was one of the first to appreciate and advocate the im- 
portance of home education. His interest in the progress 
and training of the students of the Church, was manifested 
to the last by his invariable attendance on the public exami- 
nations, at the close of each collegiate session, at the Belfast 
Institution ; and by the anxiety he evinced for the establish- 
ment of a theological faculty. At one its annual meetings 
in the beginning of this century, the Synod of Ulster 
appointed four of its ministers to take steps for the 
circulation of Bibles and Testaments among the people. 
Mr. Thomson was one of that number. This circum- 
stance deserves to be noticed, not merely on account of 
the confidence reposed in the zeal and activity of these 
brethren, but because it is an evidence of the early interest 
taken by the Presbyterian Churches in Ireland, in the dis- 
semination of the Scriptures, and proves that they had 
directed their energies to this all-important work. This 
Committee was subsequently dissolved in consequence of the 
formation of the Hibernian Bible Society and its branches 



BIOGBAPHICAL NOTICES. 283 

in the North. Towards the close of his ministry he removed 
to Belfast, and became one of the guardians of several reli- 
gious and benevolent institutions in that town. Mr. Thom- 
son's services were invaluable. Economical in the application 
of public funds, yet most anxious to relieve the destitute and 
distressed, he guarded against every species of useless ex- 
penditure, with zeal, which never wearied, and circumspection 
which never relaxed. His marriage with Jane, eldest 
daughter of the Rev, William Laird, second minister of 
the congregation of Rosemary Sti'eet, Belfast, took place in 
November, 1770. His private life and character gave weight 
to his public instructions. His deportment was calm and 
dignified, yet kind and thoughtful. As a Christian bishop 
he was given to hospitality. Habitually cheerful and lively, 
delighting in the society of his relatives and literary friends, 
he rendered his domestic circle ever attractive and happy. 
Though firm and decided in his public conduct, no sternness 
marked his private walk and conversation. All unnecessary 
restraint was removed by the benignity and suavity of his 
manners. A kind husband, an affectionate parent, a steady 
friend, a faithful pastor, an undaunted witness for the faith 
as it is in Jesus — his whole life evinced the transforming in- 
fluence of the gospel. Believing in Christ — rejoicing in 
Him as all his salvation, and all his desire, he calmly passed 
away, with a hope full of immortality, on the 23rd March, 
1828, having entered on the sixty-second year of his ministry, 
and eighty- seventh of his life. He was interred in the 
parochial burying-ground of Carnmoney, and a simple monu- 
ment now marks his resting-place. His funeral was attended 
by upwards of forty clergymen of various religious denomi- 
nations. One sentiment of profound respect for the 
character of this venerable man pervaded the assembled multi- 
tude ; and his remains were consigned to the tomb, amidst 
demonstrations of public respect and tears of private and 
personal affection. While he lived he was " an ensample to the 
flock." Being dead he is not forgotten. " The memory of 
the just is blessed." 

THE REV. HENRY JACKSON DOBBIN, D.D. 

This distinguished minister died at Ballymena on the 
15th of April, 1853. His grandfather, the Rev. Henry 
Jackson, who was minister of Banbridge, is said to have been 



284 BIOGEAPHICAL NOTICES. 

related to General Jackson, President of the United States 
of America. His father, the Rev. Hamilton Dobbin, was 
minister of Lurgan. Mr. Heniy Jackson Dobbin was 
ordained to the pastoral charge of the congregation of Hills- 
borough by the Presbytery of Belfast on the 18th September, 
1833. He soon distinguished himself in the courts of the 
Church by his gentlemanly bearing, his knowledge of the 
forms of ecclesiastical procedm*e, and his graceful and fluent 
elocution. In 1837 he removed to the congregation of First 
Ballymena, where he was installed on the 20th of June in 
that year. In 1848 Dr. Dobbin was chosen Moderator of 
the General Assembly. He was the youngest minister who 
has ever yet occupied that position ; and yet he discharged 
its duties with a tact and dignity which elicited universal 
admiration. He possessed a fine taste and a highly- 
cultivated mind. His library, at his death, consisted of 
upwards of 2,000 volumes. Nearly forty ministers, includ- 
ing some who had travelled from a great distance, followed 
his remains to the grave. The immense concourse of in- 
dividuals at his funeral, not a few of whom were in tears, 
attested the regard in which he was held by all classes of 
the community. 

JAMES YOUNG, Esq., BALLYMENA. 

In the beginning of the j^resent century, Ballymena, though 
now a large and flourishing town, presented a not very 
attractive appearance. With three or four exceptions, the 
houses were all thatched ; and a steep hill in Church Street, 
between the Market-house and Meeting-house Lane, was a 
formidable obstacle in the way of the old mail coach, as it 
moved forward on its course from Belfast to Londonderry. 
The parish church, standing in the middle of the jjresent 
graveyard, was frequented by few worshippers ; and the 
incumbent, — a quiet gentleman, and, after the fashion of 
the times, a Justice of the Peace — was not likely very much 
to disturb the thoughts of any of his auditors who might 
feel inclined to repose. The Meeting-house — for there was 
only one in the town — was a larger building ; but it was in a 
state of naked simplicity, as it was without stove, ceiling, or 
flooring. An apartment adjoining, in which the elders met, 
was used on weekdays as a schoolhouse ; and there a goodly 
number of the children of the place received the elements of 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 285 

education. The elders connected with the meeting-house 
were persons of more or less influence. One of them — Thomas 
Dickey — was the agent of the Ballymena estate : another, 
William Gihon, J.P., was one of the very few Presbyterian 
magistrates then in Ulster ; another, Dr. Patrick, was the 
father-in-law of Mr. Brown, one of the merchant princes of 
the great American Eepublic ; another John Killen — long 
the session clerk — was the father of Dr. Killen, President of 
Assembly's College, Belfast ; and another, was William 
Young. Mr. Toung was noted for his shrewdness and over- 
flowing wit ; and a venerable queue, which adorned his 
powdered head, marked him out in the congregation as one of 
the leaders of the people. He had four sons, one of whom, 
John, died before he had well reached manhood. The other 
three — James, William, and Robert — lived to advanced age. 
Robert, who recently passed away full of years, and high in 
the esteem of all who knew him, became an eminent linen 
merchant ; and dispensed an ample fortune with a generous 
hand, William — the father of John Toung, Esq., D.L., 
Galgorm Castle — was a skilful physician, who had large 
practice throughout the County Antrim. At a more advanced 
period of life he was manager of one of the Ballymena 
banks. He possessed a vigorous intellect ; he could clothe 
his thoughts in most graceful diction ; and, somewhat after 
the manner of the late Archbishop Whateley, he delighted, 
by putting questions and suggesting difficulties, to test the 
logical capacity of those with whom he engaged in conver- 
sation. James, who was the senior member of the family, 
was of a different temperament. He had few words, and 
was disposed to shrink from publicity. It was understood 
that the three brothers were in pai'tnership in business. 
A stranger might have seen nothing very striking in 
his appeai-ance ; but those who knew him well were aware 
that he possessed great mercantile ability, and that to 
his sagacity and sound judgment the firm was very much 
indebted for the high commercial position which it eventu- 
ally occupied. In early life James Young was brought under 
deep religious impressions. He was a great admirer of the 
late Dr. Cooke, the eloquent minister of May Street Church, 
Belfast ; and he was wont to say that he had derived from 
him his first clear views of the way of salvation. Durino- 
the Arian controversy Mr. Young took a decided stand on 
the side of orthodoxy ; and he was one of those men who, 



286 BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

like the late Captain Rowan, of Downpatriek, contributed to 
give a tone to public sentiment in the neighbourhoods with 
which they were connected. At that period the doctrine of 
many people in Ballymena was not well-defined. Dr. Cooke 
visited the place during the crisis of the Arian struggle, 
preached to a crowed congregation, and thus rendered im- 
portant service to the Trinitarian cause. On this occasion 
he received a hearty welcome and hospitable entertainment 
at the house of Mr. James Young. Mr. Young was one of 
the founders of the Wellington Street Congregation of 
Ballymena. He saw that the town was greatly in want of 
church accommodation. A pew in the old meeting-house 
was considered a kind of freehold, and was sometimes sold 
at a high price. Many of the people found it impossible to 
obtain sittings. But when the formation of a new congre- 
gation was proposed, the erection of the building was dreaded 
as a most formidable undertaking. Mr. James Young at 
once put down his name for .£30 — then deemed an extraordi- 
nary contribution ; and afterwards added largely to this 
subscription. The new congregation proved to be a great 
success ; the E-ev. Alexander Patterson was chosen as the 
first minister ; the spacious edifice was soon filled in all its 
parts with attentive worshippers ; and Mr. James Young was 
chosen by common consent as one of the first elders. He 
contributed much, by his social influence and weight of 
character, to the prosperity of the congregation. Missions 
were then in their infancy ; but from the first he was a 
bountiful contributor to their support. His purse was open 
for the encouragement of every good design. When he 
found that, in the midst of his mercantile engagements, he 
could not perform the duties of an elder so efficiently as he 
desired, he employed a pious Scripture reader, and paid him 
a handsome salary, to visit his district of the congregation. 
In the early part of 1847 — the year of famine — Mr. Patter- 
son, his minister, fell a victim to the prevailing fever. Mr, 
Young, who had been his steady and generous friend, 
sincerely deplored his removal. In a few weeks afterwards 
he was himself numbered with the dead. He died, as he 
had lived, in peace ; and left behind a most fragrant memory. 
Long will the people of Ballymena remember the humble 
Christian walk, the large-heartedness, and the look of 
benevolence which beamed from the countenance of Mr. 
James Young. Our readers will be gratified to hear that 



BIOGEAPHICAL NOTICES. 287 

William Young, Esq., J.P., of Fenaghy, one of the elders 
of our Churcli, is the son of the gentleman of whom we 
have supplied this brief notice. Mr. William Young is the 
author of the paper on " Systematic and Proportionate 
Giving as the Secret of Successful Church Finance," which 
has obtained such extensive circulation, and rendered such 
service to our Sustentation Fimd. Infidels may scofE ; but 
no one who respects the statements of Scripture will despise 
the blessing of being descended from a godly parent. There 
is assuredly truth in the declaration of the Psalmist : " The 
children of thy servants shall continue, and their seed shall 
be established before thee." 




SIGNIFICATION OF NAMES OF PLACES, 

COMPILED CHIEFLY FROM DR. JOYCE'S "ORIGIN AND HISTORY 
OF IRISH NAMES OF PLACES." 



Aghadoey— Duffy's field. 
Anaghlone — marsh of the 

meadow. 
Anahilt— the doe's marsh. 
Ardglass— the green height. 
Ardstraw — tlie height of (or 

near) the river bank. 
Armagh — Macha's height. 
Armoy — the eastern plain. 
Athlone —the ford of Loan. Loan 

■was a man's name, formerly 

common. 
Aughnacloy — the field of the 

stone. 
Badoney — the tent of the church. 
Ballina — the ford mouth of the 

wood. 
Ballinderry — the town of the 

(Jerry or oakwood. 
Ballindreat — the town of the 

bridge. 
Ballinglen — the town of the 

glen. 
Ballybay — the ford mouth of 

the birch. 
Ballycarry — the town of the 

weir. 
Ballycastle — the town of the 

castle. 
Ballyclare — the town of the 

plain. 
Ballygowan — the town of the 

smiths. 
Ballygrainey — the sunny town. 
Ballymena the middle town. 
Ballymoney- the town of the 

shrubbery. 
Ballymoate — the town oi the 

moat. 
Ballynahinch — the town of the 

island. 



Ballynure— the town of the 

yew. 
Ballyshannon — the mouth of 

Shannagh's ford. Shannagh 

or Seanach was a man's name 

in common use. 
Ballywillan — the town of the 

mill. 
Belfast — the ford of the sand- 
bank, referring to a sandbank 

across the mouth of the 

Lagan. 
Benburb- the proud peak. 
Billy — the ancient tree. 
Boveva — Maev's hut. 
Hrigh- a hill. 
Broughshane — the border of 

John or Shane. 
Carlingford — the fiord or bay of 

the deceitful pool, referring to 

a whirlpool existing there. 
Carlow — the quadruple lake. 

There is a tradition that the 

Barrow anciently formed four 

lakes. 
Carrickfergus — Fergus's rock. 
Castlebar — Barry's castle. 
Castlereagh — the grey castle. 
Cavan — a hollow. 
Cavanaleck — the hill of the 

flagstone. 
Clare - a board. 
Clogher — stony. 
Clones — Eos's meadow. 
Clontibret — the meadow of the 

spring. 
Clough— the stone or stone 

building. 
Coleraine— the ferny corner. It 

is said to have been formerly 

covered with ferns. 



SIGNIFICATION OF NAMES OF PLACES. 



289 



Comber — the confluence, or the 

place where two rivers meet. 
Conlig — the stone of the hounds. 
Connor — the oakwood of the 

wild dogs. 
Convoy — the plain of the 

hounds. 
Cork— the swampy place. 
Corlea — a grey round hill. 
Creggan — rocky land. 
Crumlin^the curved glen. 
Cushendun— the foot of the river 

Dun. 
Cushendall — the foot of the river 

Dall. 
Derry — an oakwood. 
Donaghadee — the Cliurch of lo.<?3. 
Donagheady — the church of 

Keedy or Caidoc. Caidoc is 

said to have been a companion 

of Columbanus. 
Donegal — the fortress of the 

foreigners. 
Donegore — the fortress of the 

O'Curras. 
Don oughmore — the great church. 

It is said that Christian 

worship was established at a 

very early period at all places 

with the prefix Donagh or 

Donough. 
Douglass — the black stream. 
Drogheda— the bridge of the 

ford. 
Dromore — a great ridge. 
Drum — a ridge. 
Drumbo —the cow's ridge. 
Drumquin — Con's ridge. 
Dublin — the black pool. 
Dunboe — the fortress of the 

cow. 
Dundalk — the fort of Delga, a 

chieftain who is said to have 

built a fortress near this place. 
Dundonald — Donall's fortress. 
Duneane — the fortress of the two 

birds. 
Dunfanaghy — Finncha's fort. 
Dunsannon — Geanan'd fort. 



Dunluce — a strong fort. 
Dunmurry- -Murray's fort. 
Enniskillen — f'ethleen's island. 

Cethleen or Kehlen is said to 

have been the wife of a 

celebrated pirate chieftain. 
Fahan — ^little. 

Fannet — the sloping ground. 
Fintona — the fair-coloured 

field. 
Finvoy — the white or bright 

plain. 
Garvagh — rough land. 
Glennan — a little glen. 
Glenwherry — the glen of the 

cauldron or deep whirlpool. 
Granslia — a grange. 
Hillsborough — so called from 

being the residence of the 

Hill's, or Downshire family. 
Inch or Inish — an island. 
Keady — a hillock. 
Killinchy — the Cluirch of the 

island. 
Letterkenny — the hill-slope ot 

the O'Kannanans, a powerful 

tribe. 
Lisburn — the burned fort. 
Loughbrickland — the lake of 

Bricrenn, an old Ulster 

chieftain. 
Lurgan — a long low ridge. 
Macosquin — the plain of Cosgran, 

a man's name. 
Maghera — the little plain. 
Monaghan— the little shrubbery. 
Moneymore — the great shrub- 
bery. 
Mountmellick-the boggy land 

of the marsh. 
Mourn e or Mor-rin- the great 

hill. 
Moville — the plain of the ancient 

tree. 
Newry — the yew tree. 
Portadown — the landing-place of 

the fortress. 
Portrush — the landing-place of 

the peninsula. 



290 



SIGNIFICATION OF NAMES OF PLACES. 



Ramoan — Modan's fort. 

Raphoe — the fort of tlie huts. 

Rathfriland — Freelan's rath. 

Ray — the fort. 

Sion— the fairy mount. 

Sligo — the shelly river. 

Strabane — the fair or white 

river-holm. 
Stranorlar— tlie river bank of 

the floor. 



Tandragee — the backside to the 

Avind. 
Tobermore — a great well. 
TuUamore — a great hill. 
TuUy— a little hill. 
Tullylish— the hill of the fort. 
Turlough— a lake which dries 

up in summer. 
Urney— the oratory or prayer- 

liouse. 




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